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ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1994 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
When the autumn winds at the Jersey Shore begin swinging in hard from the northeast, the seasonal shops and restaurants shutter down and begin the long wait for spring. It's nice to know, however, that there are some places that ride out the cold months just as we do. Frisanco, in Atlantic City, is a great example of a restaurant that serves us winter visitors. Seeing its glowing window neon on a dark winter night is as reassuring a sight as the old lighthouse beacons must have been to sailors.
NEWS
November 20, 1992 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
Talk about successful. The partners who operate the lovably divey, funky- artsy Italian restaurant called Trattoria dell'Artista at 130 N. 3rd St. in Old City have opened a second one - on the same block. L'Osteria dell'Artista at 114 N. 3rd has much in common with its forerunner: low prices, simple cooking, amusing mix 'n' match decor and some of the same dishes, although L'Osteria emphasizes seafood. Both are BYOB; both have open kitchens that let you watch the chefs at work; neither accepts credit cards.
NEWS
October 4, 1987 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
When it comes to family fun, the frolicsome circus atmosphere at Caffe Beejay in Flourtown may be just the place. An overhanging red, green, blue and yellow awning frames a brightly lighted salad room, the restaurant's most compelling feature, filled with balloons, giant jars of colored candies, stuffed clowns, polished brass railings, bouquets of bright yellow and pink silk tulips and orange-and-yellow fruit displays. The area is a-clutter with giant gourds, flower-like sprays of dried spaghetti and oversized jars of lollipops, jujubes, gummy bears, cashews, peanuts, oyster crackers, pasta spirals, pepperoncini and cherry peppers.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1996 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Over the years, David Chan has expanded his Mai Lai Wah restaurant from a basic noodle house to a place where you can get duck specialties and a host of other provincial Chinese dishes. So when he decided to put some additional emphasis on seafood, he opened a second place, on Ninth Street, just around the corner from his 10th and Race Street Mai Lai Wah Restaurant and Noodle House. The name of this other Chinatown entry is David's Mai Lai Wah II Seafood Restaurant. As the name implies, you have a large selection of seafood choices.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1993 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Before it closed a few years ago, the Olde Philadelphia Tavern & Restaurant at Front and Bainbridge Streets was known for its sweet-and-spicy crabs. It also had a reputation as a congenial neighborhood-type tappie where you could watch sports events on television and toss down suds along with the shellfish. The restaurant reopened early last month, and the new owners have picked up the old beat without missing a step. Of course the spot has been updated - in menu and decor - but the aim seems pretty much the same: reasonably priced food seriously prepared and served in a clean and attractive setting.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1997 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Good news for those who frequent Penn's Landing and eventually find themselves searching for basic, reasonably priced fare: Schooner Tavern & Restaurant is now out of dry dock. This onetime popular eatery on Front Street, two blocks south of South, had been out of commission for a year or so. Now its tiny galley is back and serving fundamental but quality food in generous portions at some very reasonable prices. So if you're in the mood for nothing more elaborate than soup, chili, pizza, sandwiches, and a few entrees, you should find contentment here.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1988 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Portofino Restaurant really hasn't changed all that much in the decade it has been in the vicinity of 13th and Walnut Streets: Tables are still comfortable and roomy, and Ralph Berarducci is still the same affable host. Even the old steady service is alive and well - and as punctual as ever. What is different at Portofino's? The menu. Several rich and abundant pasta dishes have been added, along with other items designed to perk up jaded palates. A few new wines have bolstered the limited wine list - not many, but enough to bring the list up to date.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1986 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Not long after Du Burry's Dining Saloon opened about two years ago, I marveled at its more than reasonably priced menu, the quality of the food and the enormous portions. I worried, however, that the more dinners the place sold, the sooner this Center City restaurant would fall into bankruptcy and vanish. Much to my amazement, Du Burry's not only is still around, but the prices also have stayed virtually the same. And guess what? The place has been enlarged so that it can feed more people more comfortably.
FOOD
February 19, 1986 | By POLLY FISHER, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: What is almond meal and where can I buy it? - Louann Dear Louann: You can purchase almond meal at some natural foods and gourmet foods shops, but it's easy to make your own. Almond meal is simply very finely ground almonds. Just put almonds in a food processor or blender and grind them until they are powdery. You must be careful not to overgrind the nuts or you might end up with almond butter. If you're using the almond meal in a sweet dish, you could add a little sugar while grinding the nuts.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1996 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Conversation at our table was interrupted by a most wonderful aroma that could only come from a dish of mussels in white sauce. Soft nuances of wine and a distinctive bouquet of garlic seemed to be conducting their own dialogue. We hadn't ordered them. They were being brought to the next table where two young couples were obviously enjoying their Saturday night out at Vincent's Mansion House, a Gloucester City spot that has grown from local tavern to restaurant. I was told later that mussels ($4.50)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 7, 2004 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Chick's Tavern is the only eatery I know where a meal is not complete without a plastic bucket on the table. On my visit, the dull thuds of tossed mussel shells soon gave away to sharp clicks - sort of like the snapping sounds of castanets - as the bucket filled. At this third-generation family restaurant, mussels are served two ways: by themselves or heaped on a bed of linguine. Either way, they're served with red or white sauce and placed in a dish the size of a punch bowl.
FOOD
October 25, 2000 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
By now, the story of how Susanna Foo entered the restaurant business is familiar to many Philadelphians. The former librarian had two young sons when she went to work as a hostess at Hunan at 1721 Chestnut Street, which was owned by her husband's family. Business was poor, customers complained about the food, and Susanna had to agree. The chefs relied on canned ingredients and frozen fish. Every dish was made with either a soy-based brown sauce or a white sauce based on MSG. When business got so bad that much of the staff was laid off, Susanna reluctantly stepped into the kitchen, bringing with her a reverence for fresh ingredients but no formal training.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1999 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Over the years, much has changed about South Street Souvlaki. Which is good. There are some things that have not changed. Which is also good. For example, the same commitment to quality is still there, and both prices and portions remain good deals. Way, way back, somewhere in the late 1970s, South Street Souvlaki was a small, somewhat cramped place where a lot of folks learned about spinach pies, gyros and even souvlaki. It was inexpensive fare taken at a few tables in an austere environment, warmed by flickering flames that seared food in an enticing sizzle.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1999 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Most people call him George. Which is his name, but not his given name. "My first name is Adel [which rhymes with paddle]," he explains, "but almost everyone would pronounce it Adele, like the girl's name. So I just began telling everyone it's George. " Which happens to be Adel George's last name. Now George spends a lot of time telling patrons that his new restaurant, Bistro La Baia, which means bay in Italian, is pronounced By-ah. George, who is from Cairo, opened La Baia, at 17th and Lombard Streets, eight months ago. But his love affair with Italian food goes back to when he first arrived in Philadelphia, around 1980.
NEWS
September 2, 1998 | by Lauralee Dobbins, For the Daily News
Luigi Basile is proud as a new papa of his recently renovated Laceno Italian Grill, a 4-year-old BYO in a Voorhees strip mall. The decor, with white linen cloths and cool terra cotta walls, tile floor and imposing brick oven is decidedly chic and feels surprisingly stylish given the location. We found ourselves under-dressed in chinos and polo shirts on a recent Saturday night. The restaurant was so busy we had to wait 20 minutes before our reservation was honored. Without a liquor license Laceno's provides no place to wait while tables are readied.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1998 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Some friends were talking the other day about restaurants. A couple of them asked if there was a dining spot truly representative of a typical, old-time South Philadelphia Italian eatery. Well, I told them, there was a classic: Graziano's Ristorante. One problem. Graziano's is in South Jersey, not South Philly. But once inside, you'd never know. Eyeballing the surroundings and enjoying the menu, it could be 10th and Reed, or 12th and Dickinson. Graziano's, on the White Horse Pike en route to the Shore, has been serving a fine and honest version of American-Southern Italian fare for nearly 20 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1997 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Even the first time you dine at Casmirri's, it doesn't take long before you feel as if you've eaten at this Bensalem restaurant before. The service has a friendly, personal and gracious style that almost makes you think that if you checked birth records, you might even be part of the family. What is particularly nice about this, is it's done in a way that does not intrude upon your privacy. This is a small place, right? Wrong. It seats about 125. Even the bar cuts an expansive rectangle, with patrons who appear as affable as the staff.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1997 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Good news for those who frequent Penn's Landing and eventually find themselves searching for basic, reasonably priced fare: Schooner Tavern & Restaurant is now out of dry dock. This onetime popular eatery on Front Street, two blocks south of South, had been out of commission for a year or so. Now its tiny galley is back and serving fundamental but quality food in generous portions at some very reasonable prices. So if you're in the mood for nothing more elaborate than soup, chili, pizza, sandwiches, and a few entrees, you should find contentment here.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1996 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Over the years, David Chan has expanded his Mai Lai Wah restaurant from a basic noodle house to a place where you can get duck specialties and a host of other provincial Chinese dishes. So when he decided to put some additional emphasis on seafood, he opened a second place, on Ninth Street, just around the corner from his 10th and Race Street Mai Lai Wah Restaurant and Noodle House. The name of this other Chinatown entry is David's Mai Lai Wah II Seafood Restaurant. As the name implies, you have a large selection of seafood choices.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1996 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Conversation at our table was interrupted by a most wonderful aroma that could only come from a dish of mussels in white sauce. Soft nuances of wine and a distinctive bouquet of garlic seemed to be conducting their own dialogue. We hadn't ordered them. They were being brought to the next table where two young couples were obviously enjoying their Saturday night out at Vincent's Mansion House, a Gloucester City spot that has grown from local tavern to restaurant. I was told later that mussels ($4.50)
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