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White Shoes

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NEWS
May 22, 1993 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MICHAEL BRYANT
Eleven-year-old Vinny Dolce (with the white shoes) and his brother Joey, 12, doubled up on a swing at Columbus Park when the weather turned warm yesterday. Forecasters say a brief shower is possible today. Otherwise, expect rain-free skies and a high of 72 in the Philadelphia area. Tomorrow should also be fine swinging weather, but thunderstorms are possible beginning Monday.
NEWS
July 11, 1994 | By Joe Daly, FOR THE INQUIRER
John Yank is sitting alongside Joe Zaborowski on the dock at the Ocean City Marina, telling stories about the man who lived large enough here to become a legend. "Always in white," he is saying. "White shirt. White shoes. He kept a half-dozen pairs of those white shoes at his place, and if he got even the slightest scuff he would change to a new pair. "I was 8 or 9 years old then. He put me to work scraping the bilge on his boat, paid me 50 cents an hour. He reminded me of Popeye.
NEWS
November 30, 1992 | By Steve Wartenberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It must have been the shoes. For the annual Thanksgiving Day game against Downingtown, the Coatesville Red Raiders' defense wore white shoes, and the offense wore its regular black shoes. It wasn't a fashion statement or psychological ploy - it was just an attempt for better traction. "We knew the field was muddy and slippery," linebacker Terrell Bryant said of the field at Downingtown. "And after we slipped and slided all over the place against Cumberland Valley (in a 28-19 loss)
NEWS
July 2, 1994 | By DICK MEISTER
Blue caps. Red caps. Blue blouses. Green blouses. Navy blue blouses. Royal blue blouses. Baby blue blouses. Teal blue blouses. Even turquoise blouses. Is that any way for major league baseball players to dress? Of course not. Yet it's the way far too many are uniformed this season. You know, like those guys who get together on weekends to play a little softball and drink a lot of beer. The Phillies, some of whom look like weekend softball players, had their little flap over wearing blue caps.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1994 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Don't mess with Beverly Sutphin. We say this not because the Baltimore homemaker is a neatnik whose cheery tract home has never seen a dust speck. We say this because the wholesome, neatly coiffed wife and mother of two is a pen pal of notorious nurse-killer Richard Speck. It is the strained conceit of John Waters' black comedy Serial Mom that inside the crisp shirtwaist of the suburban housewife thumps the heart of a mass murderer. Starring Kathleen Turner as Beverly Sutphin, mother of all mothers, Waters' film means to be a goof on the popular image of the apple-pie mom - meaning that Waters, director of Polyester and Hairspray, finds humor rather than horror in the worm squirming through that pie. Serial Mom is a one-joke affair and that joke is perversity.
SPORTS
August 2, 1990 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Sports Columnist
Mike Schmidt has described it countless times, the influence Pete Rose had on his career. "I've described it a billion times," Schmidt said, pressed one more time in the stampede of 1980 reminiscences. "He was a positive influence on my baseball career from the day I first met him. "He always had something to say to me that made me feel good. One year, we were wearing white shoes, in '75, I think. "I was playing pepper with Larry Bowa and a couple of other guys, behind the batting cage.
NEWS
December 8, 1988 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Soviet doctor Yuri Valentik comes to Philadelphia, he shops at Funk O Mart. So does physician Marina Tarinova. So do dozens of Soviets. And why not? After all, it is "Philadelphia's Underground of Sound. " What better place for Russian doctors to buy Korean-made boomboxes? Four busloads of Soviets hustled through the streets of Center City yesterday, spending dollars with an enthusiasm worthy of the most ardent American shopper. It could have been a game show.
NEWS
August 20, 1996 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Retire after 50 years in the flower business? No, thanks. Cut back to a five-day work week? Forget it. "As long as I can keep going, I'll keep going," said Catherine Walrath, dressed in spotless white pants, white shoes and a white-flowered blouse as she bustled about her shop here last week. That sums up her approach not just to running a business for 50 years, but also to each day. It has guided her small corner store, Talarico's Flowers, and been the pillar on which Walrath, widowed 40 years ago with five children to rear, always has relied.
SPORTS
June 28, 1991 | By Diane Pucin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every day, Wimbledon issues an elegantly worded and pessimistic weather forecast. There's also an attempt at a tennis update. Yesterday's report could have read: "Showers followed by a powerful burst of Stefan Edberg followed by thunderstorms followed by a patch of dazzling white that was Andre Agassi followed by blowing rain followed by . . . showers. " And the weather outlook for today? More of the same. Only six of 82 scheduled matches were completed yesterday at Wimbledon.
SPORTS
June 17, 1994 | By Michael Bamberger, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The temperature readings at a U.S Open are a backdrop for the national championship, the way the winds are at a British Open, the way hole placements are at Augusta. A classic U.S. Open is thick and sluggish, like Moby Dick, until the closing chapters, read late Sunday afternoon, when the winner emerges, standing flushed but tall in the fading heat after the others have wilted. In truth, the U.S. Open, an annual mid-June affair, is not always played in simmering heat - it just seems that way. The heat is to be counted upon, along with snarling rough and hard greens and cranky old golf courses with graceful clubhouses and bad plumbing.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
White, rubber-soled shoes are giving girls (and guys) a chic boost this spring as athletic wear continues to get a dressy makeover.   The trendlet   Navy or neutral. Marsala or metallic. Leopard-print or white. Kicks of any color with thick, white bottoms are cool and comfortable. Meant to be worn without socks, the shoes look fantab with cutoff denim. Girls get a needed lift with the maxi dress. Guys should slip on a pair when an event calls for a linen or cotton-twill, slate-gray suit.
SPORTS
June 15, 2012
SAN FRANCISCO — Normally, the only way to get the golf media up with the sun is to offer them a comped round at Pebble Beach. With caddies thrown in, of course. Maybe even breakfast. But Thursday morning at the Olympic Club, a different kind of enticement had them piling into all those early shuttle buses. This time it was that 7:33 first-round pairing for your 112th U.S. Open, with Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson and the newest major winner, Bubba Watson. Before the ESPN cameras even came on, their opening ninth hole was the spot to be. Much the same way that on Wednesday night it had been across town at AT&T Park.
NEWS
June 30, 2011 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
As was evident on Thursday's opening day of the AT&T National at Aronimink, golf and fashion sense, much like bowling and sobriety, are mutually exclusive terms. Given that their clothing tastes tend to range from garish to ghastly, it's always been difficult to know whether golfers are way ahead of the fashion curve or they wiped out on the first turn back in 1966. Anyway, after a day at Aronimink, one fashion trend was in clear focus: white belts. Are they in again?
NEWS
May 8, 2008
My most enduring memory of my mother, Lee Kennedy, is of her standing at the kitchen sink, washing dishes, looking out the window that faced our backyard, and singing to herself. There were five of us kids, so she was washing dishes constantly. Sometimes I'd catch her looking off into the distant woods, and I fancied her picturing herself on a stage somewhere, singing to a grand audience. She'd given up her career in musical theater for marriage and family, and I think this was the only way she felt she could have a connection to the life she left behind.
NEWS
November 20, 2002 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Surveying Paul Fussell's elegantly crammed Walnut Street apartment, one suspects how and why Philadelphia's great scholar-curmudgeon ended up knocking out his droll new study, Uniforms: Why We Are What We Wear (Houghton Mifflin, $22). Late at night, while wife and fellow writer Harriet Behringer sleeps, the 78-year-old author of The Great War and Modern Memory - named by Modern Library as one of the 20th-century's top nonfiction books - undoubtedly wanders amid his rooms of war and travel bric-a-brac in full regalia of one sort or another.
SPORTS
October 31, 1996 | by Ted Taylor, For the Daily News
Back in September, I wrote about Widener's Billy "White Shoes" Johnson, who had been honored by the College Football Hall of Fame for his accomplishments at the NCAA Division III school. I was public relations director at Widener during Johnson's career, and I mentioned several of his more remarkable games, including one against Franklin & Marshall College in which he gained 151 yards and scored two touchdowns - on his first three touches of the game! Well, that comment struck a nerve with J. Ward Larkin, F & M Class of '76. Larkin wrote to my editor, saying that I "failed to mention that Billy's club lost the game and . . . [Billy]
SPORTS
September 26, 1996 | by Ted Taylor, For the Daily News
A few careers ago, I had the privilege of serving as public relations director at Widener College during the explosive career of Billy "White Shoes" Johnson. I saw the running back score most - if not all - of his 62 career Widener touchdowns, and I got to know this personable young man extremely well. So, it came as no surprise to me when Johnson, always a Hall of Fame human being, became an official Hall of Famer recently when he was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in South Bend, Ind. I remember what a pleasure Johnson was to work with and how he stopped in my office to thank me for helping him get named to the small college All-America team.
NEWS
August 20, 1996 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Retire after 50 years in the flower business? No, thanks. Cut back to a five-day work week? Forget it. "As long as I can keep going, I'll keep going," said Catherine Walrath, dressed in spotless white pants, white shoes and a white-flowered blouse as she bustled about her shop here last week. That sums up her approach not just to running a business for 50 years, but also to each day. It has guided her small corner store, Talarico's Flowers, and been the pillar on which Walrath, widowed 40 years ago with five children to rear, always has relied.
SPORTS
May 18, 1996 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Terry Bradshaw, Walter Payton, Wilbert Montgomery and Widener's Billy "White Shoes" Johnson were among the first group of players from the NCAA's Division I-AA, II and III and the NAIA named to the College Football Hall of Fame yesterday. Bradshaw, who won four Super Bowls with the Pittsburgh Steelers, passed for 6,568 yards from 1966 to 1969 for Louisiana Tech. Payton, the NFL's all-time rushing leader with 16,726 yards in 13 seasons with the Chicago Bears, played for Jackson State from 1971 to 1974.
NEWS
October 9, 1995 | By Brian Freeman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Who said that you can't go home again? Looking as fit and trim as he did when he was a three-time Pro Bowl selection and adjudged by many as the greatest punt returner in NFL history, William Arthur Johnson, better known as Billy "White Shoes" Johnson, proved that old saying to be untrue. Johnson, who played 14 seasons in the NFL and one season in the CFL, returned to his roots Saturday, again wearing his trademark white shoes, when his former Chichester No. 11 jersey was retired in a pregame ceremony before Chichester's football game against Penn Charter at Anthony Apichella Memorial Field.
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