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Whooping Cough

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NEWS
April 11, 2005 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER NATIONAL STAFF
Whooping cough, a disease Americans figured they had whipped with the modern medical miracle of childhood vaccinations, is soaring again throughout the nation in numbers not seen in decades. When pediatric infectious-disease specialist Dennis Cunningham of Children's Hospital here tells parents that their child has whooping cough, something he has been doing a lot lately, they often ask him: "They still have that around?" Down to barely 1,000 cases in 1976, pertussis - the scientific name for whooping cough - steadily rose in 1980s and 1990s in America.
NEWS
December 15, 2003 | By Chris Gray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jeffrey Collick never "whooped. " But the 17-year-old North Philadelphia youth did vomit, almost continuously, for three weeks last March. He dropped 10 pounds and stopped attending classes at George Washington Carver High School of Engineering and Science. Playing basketball became impossible. Doctors prescribed antibiotics, but nothing seemed to work. Collick grew weaker and dehydrated. Finally, his mother, Pearl Fletcher, took Collick to Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, where the 6-foot-1 athlete was diagnosed with whooping cough, a disease normally associated with infants and toddlers.
NEWS
November 18, 1999 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
A big whoop for whooping cough? A new vaccine for whooping cough has been pronounced "much safer" than the original medication, which caused sometimes serious side effects in as many as half of all vaccinated babies. The results of a large-scale study to be presented in Philadelphia tomorrow at the meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America will show that the new vaccine for whooping cough, or pertussis, showed a "substantial reduction in serious side effects," according to Dr. David W. Scheifele, director of the Vaccine Evaluation Center, Children's Hospital, British Columbia.
NEWS
September 20, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATLANTA - The whooping-cough vaccine given to babies and toddlers loses much of its effectiveness after just three years - a lot faster than doctors believed - and that could help explain a recent series of outbreaks in the U.S. among children who were fully vaccinated, a study suggests. The study is small and preliminary, and its authors said the results need to be confirmed through more research. Nevertheless, the findings are likely to stir debate over whether children should get a booster shot earlier than now recommended.
NEWS
March 28, 1990 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
The recent increase in Philadelphia whooping cough cases endangers not only un-immunized children but those who have only partial protection against this sometimes fatal illness. As many as 63 percent of U.S. toddlers have not been completely immunized against whooping cough. One-third have had no immunizations, according to a report issued in January by the federal Centers for Disease Control. Vaccine for whooping cough, medically known as pertussis, is administered with vaccine for diphtheria and tetanus.
NEWS
February 14, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A ninth grader at Pennfield Middle School in Montgomery County's North Penn School District has been diagnosed with whooping cough, an official said Monday. The student came to school Monday morning, mentioned he had whooping cough last week, and was sent home, said Christine Liberaski, the district's manager of school and community engagement. The district sees a handful of cases each year, she said. In a letter to parents posted on North Penn's website, officials warned: "Your child may have been exposed.
NEWS
February 13, 2012 | By Bonnie Cook, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A ninth-grader at Pennfield Middle School in the North Penn School District in Montgomery County has been diagnosed with whooping cough, an official said this afternoon. The student came to school Monday morning, mentioned he had had whooping cough last week, and was immediately sent home, said Christine Liberaski, the North Penn School District's manager of school and community engagement. In a letter to parents posted today on the school district's website, district officials warned, "Your child may have been exposed.
NEWS
February 3, 2012
Two cases of pertussis, popularly known as whooping cough, have been reported at Hillsdale Elementary School in West Chester, prompting officials to bar any students or staff who have not been vaccinated against the disease from entering the building. The West Chester Area School District says the Chester County Health Department confirmed the second case Tuesday, qualifying it as an "outbreak" at the site. Superintendent Jim Scanlon said in a statement on the district's website that officials "have identified the Hillsdale students who were not vaccinated and will be working with the Department of Health to provide those vaccinations" that will allow them to return to school.
NEWS
April 20, 1986 | By Sara Solovitch, Inquirer Staff Writer
A whooping-cough epidemic in an Amish community west of Dover, Del., has led to the closing of six Amish schools by county health officials, a Delaware Health Department spokesman said yesterday. The epidemic, which began with the hospitalization of the first reported case on March 8, has now reached 51 cases, according to Joseph Beaver, coordinator of the immunization program for the state of Delaware. Though two infants were hospitalized, both in Kent General Hospital in Dover, there have been no deaths or permanent health problems associated with the epidemic, Beaver said.
NEWS
August 24, 2010 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A rise in reported cases of whooping cough in the Philadelphia suburbs in the last several months prompted the Pennsylvania Department of Health on Monday to urge that people throughout the state ensure that their vaccinations are up to date. It also scheduled free vaccine clinics in Delaware and York Counties. The significance of the increases - in Bucks, Chester, Montgomery, and in particular, Delaware Counties - is not clear. Although the short-term trend is up, health officials in some of the counties said the numbers this year were not much different from the same period last year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* NOVA: VACCINES - CALLING THE SHOTS. 10 tonight, WHYY12.   "NOVA" isn't usually a destination for the science-phobic or medically wary. But tonight on "Vaccines - Calling the Shots," the 40-year-old PBS series isn't just preaching to the choir. It's also trying to speak to those whose reluctance to vaccinate their children has helped fuel a resurgence in diseases like measles and whooping cough. And it's willing to resort to that staple of Facebook - videos of adorable babies - to do it. In this case, the adorable baby is 7-week-old Osman Chandab, who's shown, not so adorably, struggling for every breath in a Melbourne, Australia, hospital as his distraught mother looks on. Osman, we're told, was due for his pertussis (whooping cough)
SPORTS
January 17, 2014 | By David Murphy, Daily News Columnist
WHEN THINGS don't go well, the natural inclination is to burn through options until one finds a remedy. Except in the world of player development, such a course of action can sometimes prove more destructive toward the future than it is productive for the present. Take, for example, Jesse Biddle. Early last season, the No. 27 overall pick in 2010 made headlines with an impressive start to his Double A career. Only 21, Biddle struck out 40 batters, walked 12 and allowed one home run and six earned runs in his first 31 innings of work.
SPORTS
July 15, 2013 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW BRITAIN, Conn. - Reading lefthander Jesse Biddle always takes the mound with supreme confidence, but he conceded that he may have some nervous energy when he participates in the Futures Game on Sunday at New York's Citi Field. Part of Major League Baseball's All-Star Game festivities, the Futures Game features many of the brightest young talents in the minor leagues. Biddle, The Inquirer's No. 1-ranked Phillies prospect, can't wait to take the mound. "I never pitched in front of a crowd in a stadium that large," he said before Wednesday's Eastern League double-A all-star game.
NEWS
December 12, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
With pertussis at its highest level nationally in a half-century, the Philadelphia region has been weathering a spike that in some places is more than triple the previous record set two years ago. "We're sort of way off the scale this year," said Stephen Ostroff, Pennsylvania's acting physician general. "It really started picking up in the summer, and once kids got back to school, the [pertussis] was already there. " Cases of pertussis, also known as whooping cough, often decline in late fall into early winter.
NEWS
September 17, 2012
'90s whooping cough vaccine weakens faster than thought As the U.S. wrestles with its biggest whooping cough outbreak in decades, researchers appear to have zeroed in on the main cause: The safer vaccine that was introduced in the 1990s loses effectiveness much faster than previously thought. A new study in the New England Journal of Medicine found that the protective effect weakens dramatically soon after a youngster gets the last of the five recommended shots around age 6. The protection rate falls from about 95 percent to 71 percent within five years, said researchers at the Kaiser Permanente Vaccine Research Center in Oakland, Calif.
NEWS
August 7, 2012
Have you gotten your Tdap shot? If you don't know what that is, you aren't unusual, which helps explain why whooping cough, or pertussis, is making an alarming comeback. Nearly 18,000 cases, including nine deaths, have been reported to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention so far this year, a pace not seen since 1959. Tdap is a booster vaccine against tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis. Since 2005, when it was licensed, the CDC has recommended the shot for adolescents and adults, including pregnant women, because protection from childhood vaccination wanes.
NEWS
August 7, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Columnist
When Pennsylvania State University biologist Andrew Read injected mice with a component of several promising malaria vaccines, he got a disquieting result: The malaria parasites spread through the immunized mice and evolved to become more virulent. Unvaccinated mice infected with these super-parasites got much sicker than those infected with ordinary malaria. The findings, Read said, should not discourage research on malaria vaccines - the disease kills hundreds of thousands of African children every year, and the parasites tend to develop resistance to drugs.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Mike Stobbe, Associated Press
ATLANTA - The United States appears headed for its worst year for whooping cough in more than five decades, with the number of cases rising at an epidemic rate that experts say may reflect a problem with the effectiveness of the vaccine. Nearly 18,000 cases have been reported so far - more than twice the number seen at this point last year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday. At this pace, the number for the entire year will be the highest since 1959, when 40,000 illnesses were reported.
NEWS
February 14, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A ninth grader at Pennfield Middle School in Montgomery County's North Penn School District has been diagnosed with whooping cough, an official said Monday. The student came to school Monday morning, mentioned he had whooping cough last week, and was sent home, said Christine Liberaski, the district's manager of school and community engagement. The district sees a handful of cases each year, she said. In a letter to parents posted on North Penn's website, officials warned: "Your child may have been exposed.
NEWS
February 13, 2012 | By Bonnie Cook, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A ninth-grader at Pennfield Middle School in the North Penn School District in Montgomery County has been diagnosed with whooping cough, an official said this afternoon. The student came to school Monday morning, mentioned he had had whooping cough last week, and was immediately sent home, said Christine Liberaski, the North Penn School District's manager of school and community engagement. In a letter to parents posted today on the school district's website, district officials warned, "Your child may have been exposed.
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