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Widener University

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NEWS
February 25, 1993 | For The Inquirer / BARBARA JOHNSTON
Teams from area high schools vied for prizes in the "Mousetrap Target Practice" last Thursday at Widener University in Chester. The goal: to see which could catapult an eraser the farthest into a target using only a standard mousetrap spring for power. The team from Upper Darby - Hong Ten, Sumin Pak and BettyAnn Atkinson - won first prize, $100.
NEWS
November 5, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
A PHILLY GIRL is heading closer to home to take charge of Widener University. Julie Wollman announced yesterday that she's leaving her current position as president of Erie County's Edinboro University of Pennsylvania for the top job at Widener. "I am looking forward to strengthening the manner in which Widener can serve the needs of the metropolitan area in meaningful and mutually rewarding ways," Wollman, a Germantown native, said in a statement yesterday. She replaces interim president Stephen Wilhite, who took over after longtime president James Harris left the Chester school in August to assume the presidency at the University of San Diego.
NEWS
March 5, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert C. Melzi, 96, of Bala Cynwyd, professor emeritus of Romance languages at Widener University, died Thursday, March 1, at home. Dr. Melzi was on the Widener faculty for 30 years and chaired the Romance language department in the 1970s. He also taught courses at the University of Pennsylvania, St. Joseph's University, Villanova University, and Bryn Mawr College. In 1967, Dr. Melzi, an expert on Dante, wrote Castelvetro's Annotations to the 'Inferno': A New Perspective in Sixteenth Century Criticism . After 11 years of work, in 1973 he published the Bantam New College Italian-English Dictionary . "Up until now," he told the Philadelphia Daily News, "the bilingual dictionary for the most part reflected the tastes, culture, and language of Great Britain.
NEWS
September 14, 1999 | By Anne Barnard, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A sometime firefighter, teacher and mayor of Marcus Hook, Rep. Curt Weldon (R., Pa.) is borrowing another title this fall: professor. Last week at Widener University, he led his first class of a three-hour seminar, "Issues in American National Security," that he is teaching with Martin E. Goldstein, a government professor. Weldon has focused on relations with Russia and China during his 12 years in Congress. He said he planned to draw on that experience in the course, which will focus on a different topic in global security each week.
NEWS
April 16, 2009 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jay Bechtel's first decision as president of Widener University was a doozy. He could pluck from the waiting list and admit the hopeful high school senior whose grades and SATs were mediocre at best. Or, despite that student's improving attendance record and ambitious course load, he could send him packing. "I'm going to give him the benefit of the doubt," Bechtel said. "I hope he doesn't prove me wrong. " "Sounds good, Mr. President," responded Ed Wright, Widener director of admissions.
NEWS
May 13, 2001 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As Widener University president Robert Bruce prepares to retire next month, he can justly say that he has achieved virtually everything he set out to do when he took the school's helm 20 years ago. Bruce, 63, has guided Widener from an uncertain infancy to its current status as a well-established and respected regional educational institution. During his tenure, the university has invested more than $100 million in improvements to its three campuses and more than tripled the size of its annual operating budget.
NEWS
January 31, 2000 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The dye-stained fingers and sticky palms of 68 fifth graders were enough to convince science teacher Dorothy Waninger that the chemistry experiment at Widener University was a success. The students had discovered the science behind Silly Putty, while the teachers had observed how encouraging students to "get their hands dirty" increased interest in the lesson. Such sharing of educational techniques, Waninger said, was one of the goals of the Professional Development School contract established this school year between Lakeview Elementary School and Widener.
NEWS
July 11, 1997 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Finish college and get your law degree - in just six years! That is the promise held out to students at Pennsylvania's 14 state-run universities, under a new partnership between the public State System of Higher Education and Widener University, a private institution. The 3+3 Early Admission Program, announced yesterday, gives qualified students the option to leave undergraduate studies after three years to enter the Widener School of Law in Harrisburg. The first year of law school would also satisfy credit requirements for a bachelor's degree.
NEWS
June 3, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
A growing number of Americans are having gay sex, or at least admitting to it. And that's OK with more and more of us. "People over time are reporting more same-sex sexual experiences than ever before," said Brooke Wells, a social psychologist at Widener University's Center for Human Sexuality Studies. The behavioral trend, reflected in an annual survey conducted between 1973 and 2014, was fueled largely by people who had sex with both men and women. There has been little change in the number of people reporting exclusively homosexual behavior.
NEWS
February 6, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stanford Frank, 92, of Bala Cynwyd, the last president of Frank's Beverages, a Philadelphia bottling company known for its black cherry wishniak soda, died Thursday, Jan. 30, of age-related illness at his home. Mr. Frank was the grandson of Jacob Frank, who founded the beverage company in 1895 in South Philadelphia. In its heyday, the last half of the 20th century, Frank's was the largest privately owned beverage bottling company in the Philadelphia area. It prospered under the advertising slogan "If it's Frank's, thanks!"
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NEWS
June 3, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
A growing number of Americans are having gay sex, or at least admitting to it. And that's OK with more and more of us. "People over time are reporting more same-sex sexual experiences than ever before," said Brooke Wells, a social psychologist at Widener University's Center for Human Sexuality Studies. The behavioral trend, reflected in an annual survey conducted between 1973 and 2014, was fueled largely by people who had sex with both men and women. There has been little change in the number of people reporting exclusively homosexual behavior.
NEWS
May 8, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel, Staff Writer
For the last 10 years, Sharon Nelton has been getting into her car a couple of days a week and driving from her home in West Chester to school in nearby Exton. There, she studies film and teaches contemporary literature - and, at 78, has the time of her life. What draws her, she says, is "a hunger for being around intellectual people. " Nelton is one of more than 1,000 seniors who take part in a lifelong learning program sponsored by Widener University, and offered primarily at an Exton campus.
NEWS
February 9, 2016
ISSUE | WINTER BLUES Preventing suffering A story about seasonal affective disorder (SAD) implied that the condition was invented by big pharmaceutical companies ("Study finds no proof of 'seasonal depression,' " Philly.com, Jan. 28). While GlaxoSmithKline developed Wellbutrin XL to prevent the depressive episodes of SAD, it was not out of a desire to create an illness for which it could sell a treatment. Rather, the development program was undertaken at the urging of clinicians who saw the suffering caused by SAD and the benefits to patients of a preventive treatment option.
NEWS
February 7, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Staff Writer
For William Earle Williams, it was just a gate, distinct from the imposing stone pillars that flank the other entryways to Haverford College, but still just a gate. The limestone columns, with attached benches, along Old Railroad Avenue were graceful, light, and simple. They invited passersby to sit, rather than simply walk through. For decades, Haverford students, staff, and visitors had no idea that the Edward B. Conklin Memorial gate was the work of one of the nation's most influential and underappreciated architectural designers.
NEWS
February 5, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Staff Writer
In the perennially struggling city of Chester, which went 12 years without a supermarket, a burgeoning renaissance is on the menu along a strip of Providence Avenue near Widener University. The neighborhood now has a Mediterranean-theme diner, and will soon have a full-service Pizzeria Uno and possibly a trendy taco bar. Along with a morale boost, the developments are expected to add to the city's coffers with as many as 100 jobs at the pizzeria alone, and potentially valuable acreage entering the tax rolls.
SPORTS
December 29, 2015 | By Rick O'Brien, Staff Writer
The 11th annual Pete and Jameer Nelson Classic is set for Tuesday and Wednesday at Widener University and Chestnut Hill College. A total of 17 games are on tap at the two sites. On Tuesday at Widener, Imhotep will clash with Chester at 7 p.m. The Panthers' Daron Russell and Jaekwon Carlyle, a Hampton recruit, make up one of the area's top backcourts. The Clippers are powered by 6-foot-8 center Maurice Henry (Delaware State) and 6-7 wing Marquis Collins. Next, at 8:45 p.m., Plymouth Whitemarsh, led by 6-3 wing and Rider signee Xzavier Malone, will battle Friends' Central, fueled by 6-7 forward De'Andre Hunter, a Virginia signee, and guard Chuck Champion, who is bound for Loyola (Md.)
NEWS
November 7, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
I once spent a day with Widener University basketball coach C. Alan Rowe, which meant going to class. Even at age 63, Rowe was teaching five Widener math courses a semester. He seemed to know all the names of his students without a seating chart. His first words to one calculus class: "Your hats, gentlemen. " This was 1994. This man was delightfully old school. Rowe never complimented his players - like ever, even his favorites. He simply drilled them in the principles that he held dear.
NEWS
November 5, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
A PHILLY GIRL is heading closer to home to take charge of Widener University. Julie Wollman announced yesterday that she's leaving her current position as president of Erie County's Edinboro University of Pennsylvania for the top job at Widener. "I am looking forward to strengthening the manner in which Widener can serve the needs of the metropolitan area in meaningful and mutually rewarding ways," Wollman, a Germantown native, said in a statement yesterday. She replaces interim president Stephen Wilhite, who took over after longtime president James Harris left the Chester school in August to assume the presidency at the University of San Diego.
NEWS
November 5, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Julie Wollman, named Tuesday as president of Widener University, is focused on the student experience. She teaches a freshman seminar - "College: What, Why, How" - at Edinboro University in northwestern Pennsylvania, where she has been president since 2012. And she's taken a class herself, a beginner's course in bagpiping, rooted in Edinboro's Scottish heritage. (Edinboro was founded in 1857 as the Edinboro Academy by Scottish descendants who named it after Edinburgh, Scotland.)
NEWS
May 20, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University is starting a Confucius Institute - the first in Philadelphia - focusing on the teaching of Chinese language and culture, officials announced Monday. The school will partner with China's Zhejiang Normal University, which will send two Chinese language professors here to teach in the institute, said Temple provost Hai-Lung Dai. Each university will contribute in-kind services and personnel worth $150,000 to run the institute, which will start in July, Dai said.
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