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Wiffle Ball

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NEWS
June 26, 1998 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / VICKI VALERIO
Samir Muhammad, 11, balanced a Wiffle ball along his wrist during a presentation at a baseball clinic yesterday at Fairmount Park Dairy Fields, located at Reservoir Drive and East Fairmount Park. The clinic was sponsored by the Richie Ashburn Foundation.
NEWS
June 3, 1992 | By Marc Schogol, with reports from Inquirer wire services
CRAWLING OUR WAY Forget killer bees - fire ants are coming! For years, it was thought that the ants, which sting like a hot needle and whose bite can kill the 1 percent of people allergic to them, could not live outside their native South because of the cold winters. But now, they've worked their way as far north as Maryland, and an entomologist in that state's Department of Agriculture says, "I'm now convinced they can survive as far north as Philadelphia. " NO PREGNANT PAUSE Pregnant, poor urban women who learned they were infected with the AIDS virus were not deterred from getting pregnant and giving birth again, researchers report in the journal Obstetrics and Gynecology.
NEWS
July 10, 2002 | By Murray Dubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the summer, Lou Worthington and his friends would play hardball all day and then go back to Lou's house and wait for his father to come home to play Wiffle ball. "Me and my friends against my dad. Fast pitch. We played in the backyard and used a wheelbarrow on its arms for a strike zone. " Those were the days - the 1970s in Hulmeville, Bucks County, listening to the crack of plastic against plastic, trying to throw knucklers and curves. Worthington, 36, a database manager in Philadelphia, hasn't lived in Hulmeville for 18 years, but he was there on a Saturday late last month to play Wiffle ball again.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WIFFLE ball may not be an Olympic sport, but its practitioners are as devoted as a Jamaican bobsled team or hammer throwers in kilts. One of the sport's stars in the '60s was a robust Friends' Central kid named Bob Blau. His prowess with a bat he had painted red and blue and named the KesselKill (after a boy he used to harass with cherry bombs) was described in an article in Sports Illustrated in 1982 by Franz Lidz, a Cheltenham High School grad and Wiffle-ball practitioner who played with Bob Blau and other kids in a back yard in Penn Valley.
NEWS
September 6, 1999 | By Shannon O'Boye, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
They call each other names like "Ziggy," "Duke," "Froggy" and "Jeep. " They call their wives "the girls. " They call their hometown "God's Little Acre. " And they call their favorite pastime "Wiffle Ball. " On Saturday, about 150 men, most of whom grew up in this half-mile-square town playing variations of baseball such as Wiffle Ball, stickball, halfball, hoseball and pimpleball, converged on the American Legion baseball complex on Browning Road in their caps, T-shirts and sneakers, as they have every year for 10 years.
SPORTS
May 22, 2004 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was only a Wiffle ball game, but the competition was intense. Moorestown Friends baseball players were confined to a gym on another rainy spring day Wednesday, but they were were animated, showing the same disdain for losing they display while competing in hardball. Then again, Moorestown Friends hasn't experienced much losing this spring; even a Wiffle ball game was worth an all-out effort. Moorestown Friends has performed this season with the anonymity of a Wiffle ball team.
NEWS
April 23, 2006 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There was this gnarled piece of driftwood that followed me around for a good part of my life. I displayed it on various shelves, bookcases and coffee tables for years. Not now; I've stashed it in some closet somewhere and can't find it. That it has been around for so long is something of a surprise to me, anyway. I'm not a collector, and as a rule I don't hold onto things, even if they have sentimental value. But that piece of driftwood was the first souvenir I bought at the Jersey Shore.
NEWS
May 20, 2002
Love for his hometown lingers In reference to the May 6 column by Lola H. Moore ("Before you slam a place, think about those who care"), for 28 years I lived in Camden, and I loved it. I was born and raised in the Cramer Hill section at 28th and Cleveland. I was born in my house. My childhood was the best a kid could ever want: Wiffle Ball, wire ball and handball on a corner of 28th Street; baseball and football at Von Neida Park; basketball on our dirt court on Arthur Avenue; hopping trains to get a ride to Tippins Pond; fishing off the Pett's Island Bridge; going to the Rio or Arlo movies on Saturdays; riding our bikes to the Cherry Hill Mall.
NEWS
June 26, 1992 | By Paddy Noyes, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Reggie's face is tender and full of pride as he looks at his sister, Shanel, and his brother, George. They live in a foster home, and Reggie lives in a group home and today they are at the Adoption Center. Picking up the book Pinocchio, Reggie begins to read and Shanel rests her cheek on a blue rubber ball and listens. George hangs over his shoulder and prompts him when he pauses over the pronunciation of a long word. "They have unshakable faith that they will be adopted together because they want it so much," their social worker says, "and they look forward to their visits with great joy. " George, 8, Shanel, 3, and Reggie, 10, came into foster care in 1990, with abuse, deprivation and neglect in their background.
NEWS
June 8, 2004 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John J. Logue, 80, of Swarthmore, a professor emeritus at Villanova University who championed the concept of global government and was active in Delaware County and state politics, died of heart failure May 31 at Crozer-Chester Medical Center. For 30 years, until retiring in 1989, Dr. Logue taught political science at Villanova. He was the founder and director of the school's Common Heritage Institute and was published extensively on United Nations reform, international relations, and laws of the sea. He also wrote a play, Freedom of the Seize, which his son Timothy said was typical of his father's penchant for using humor, wordplay and creativity to bring attention to issues of the day. In 1966, Dr. Logue, a Democrat, lost the first of several campaigns for political office when he ran for U.S. Congress.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 10, 2014 | By Lydia O'Neal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Brian Miracle and his friends have been smacking Wiffle balls into the trees that shade his backyard in the Far Northeast since grade school. Now they do it for charity. Five years ago, the games were simply a way to keep high school and club baseball team friends from drifting apart after the players grew too old for club baseball. "We always played Wiffle ball when we were younger, before we had to work in the summer," Miracle said. "These guys were here every day. " Friday marked their fifth annual Wiffle Ball Extravaganza, and the second in which they raised money for the local charity Helen's Hope.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Growing up in the '50s in the Jewish neighborhood then centered on Rising Sun Avenue and Roosevelt Boulevard, Charles Sherman had an insulated, even charmed, childhood. "My whole life as a kid was within three blocks," he said. "You walked to the grocery store, to your synagogue. I had four or five aunts who lived within one block. I had cousins. It was a different kind of way of looking at community. " He went as far as Jenkintown, where the family's business, Botwinick's, outfitted a generation of bat mitzvah girls in taffeta and tulle; and Bryn Mawr, for Akiba Hebrew Academy.
NEWS
September 16, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was called a "fortress in the clouds. " The 21st Regiment of the Second Division of the North Vietnamese Army had carved a stronghold into the steep slopes of Nui Chom, a mountain with rugged peaks covered by a towering jungle canopy that blocked the sky. There, the NVA had dug 250 machine-gun bunkers to defend a secret field hospital. On Nov. 20, 1968, Michael J. Crescenz of Philadelphia walked into an ambush on Nui Chom. His squad was pinned down when he made a snap decision to grab an M60 machine gun and charge the bunkers.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WIFFLE ball may not be an Olympic sport, but its practitioners are as devoted as a Jamaican bobsled team or hammer throwers in kilts. One of the sport's stars in the '60s was a robust Friends' Central kid named Bob Blau. His prowess with a bat he had painted red and blue and named the KesselKill (after a boy he used to harass with cherry bombs) was described in an article in Sports Illustrated in 1982 by Franz Lidz, a Cheltenham High School grad and Wiffle-ball practitioner who played with Bob Blau and other kids in a back yard in Penn Valley.
NEWS
April 23, 2006 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There was this gnarled piece of driftwood that followed me around for a good part of my life. I displayed it on various shelves, bookcases and coffee tables for years. Not now; I've stashed it in some closet somewhere and can't find it. That it has been around for so long is something of a surprise to me, anyway. I'm not a collector, and as a rule I don't hold onto things, even if they have sentimental value. But that piece of driftwood was the first souvenir I bought at the Jersey Shore.
NEWS
June 8, 2004 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John J. Logue, 80, of Swarthmore, a professor emeritus at Villanova University who championed the concept of global government and was active in Delaware County and state politics, died of heart failure May 31 at Crozer-Chester Medical Center. For 30 years, until retiring in 1989, Dr. Logue taught political science at Villanova. He was the founder and director of the school's Common Heritage Institute and was published extensively on United Nations reform, international relations, and laws of the sea. He also wrote a play, Freedom of the Seize, which his son Timothy said was typical of his father's penchant for using humor, wordplay and creativity to bring attention to issues of the day. In 1966, Dr. Logue, a Democrat, lost the first of several campaigns for political office when he ran for U.S. Congress.
SPORTS
May 22, 2004 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was only a Wiffle ball game, but the competition was intense. Moorestown Friends baseball players were confined to a gym on another rainy spring day Wednesday, but they were were animated, showing the same disdain for losing they display while competing in hardball. Then again, Moorestown Friends hasn't experienced much losing this spring; even a Wiffle ball game was worth an all-out effort. Moorestown Friends has performed this season with the anonymity of a Wiffle ball team.
NEWS
July 10, 2002 | By Murray Dubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the summer, Lou Worthington and his friends would play hardball all day and then go back to Lou's house and wait for his father to come home to play Wiffle ball. "Me and my friends against my dad. Fast pitch. We played in the backyard and used a wheelbarrow on its arms for a strike zone. " Those were the days - the 1970s in Hulmeville, Bucks County, listening to the crack of plastic against plastic, trying to throw knucklers and curves. Worthington, 36, a database manager in Philadelphia, hasn't lived in Hulmeville for 18 years, but he was there on a Saturday late last month to play Wiffle ball again.
NEWS
May 20, 2002
Love for his hometown lingers In reference to the May 6 column by Lola H. Moore ("Before you slam a place, think about those who care"), for 28 years I lived in Camden, and I loved it. I was born and raised in the Cramer Hill section at 28th and Cleveland. I was born in my house. My childhood was the best a kid could ever want: Wiffle Ball, wire ball and handball on a corner of 28th Street; baseball and football at Von Neida Park; basketball on our dirt court on Arthur Avenue; hopping trains to get a ride to Tippins Pond; fishing off the Pett's Island Bridge; going to the Rio or Arlo movies on Saturdays; riding our bikes to the Cherry Hill Mall.
NEWS
September 3, 2001 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Danny McCarthy, a self-described aging fireballer, threw for seven months, using the practice facility he built in his backyard. Tom MacAdams took eight days off from work. His brother Ken prepared 700 pounds of food and brought in two bands. In their world, for a weekend, Wiffle ball is everything. On Saturday, the 12th annual Brooklawn Wiffle Ball Reunion, a 32-team tournament and party, drew area folks and former residents to the Brooklawn American Legion field, home of this year's American Legion baseball champions.
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