FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 25, 2011 | By Mark Seibel, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - Nearly two months after it made public its entire unredacted file of purloined U.S. State Department cables, WikiLeaks announced Monday that it was suspending "publishing operations" to concentrate on raising money to keep the website in business. The announcement left in doubt the future not just of WikiLeaks but also of what had been thought of as a new style of journalism that would allow would-be whistle-blowers to leak documents electronically - without the risk of having to reveal their identity to anyone.
NEWS
July 27, 2010
WikiLeaks.org's release of thousands of classified documents to three newspapers may have more impact on journalism than it will on bringing the war in Afghanistan to a swifter end. The 92,000 military logs published in the New York Times, Britain's the Guardian, and Germany's Der Spiegel were compared to the Pentagon Papers, which in 1971 revealed that high-level government officials doubted the Vietnam War could be won. But the WikiLeaks documents...
NEWS
December 17, 2011 | By Brian Bennett, Tribune Washington Bureau
FORT MEADE, Md. - Appearing in a military courtroom for the first time Friday, accused WikiLeaks source Army Pfc. Bradley Manning said he understood the charges against him in a criminal case that involves one of the largest leaks of classified material in U.S. history. The pretrial proceeding bogged down in legal maneuvering when Manning's civilian lawyer, David Coombs, argued that the presiding military officer could not be impartial because he is a federal prosecutor in civilian life.
NEWS
May 7, 2013 | By David Dishneau, Associated Press
FORT MEADE, Md. - Government secrecy reaches a new level this week in the court-martial of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, an intelligence analyst who sent 700,000 classified U.S. documents to the WikiLeaks website. A military judge, Col. Denise Lind, has ordered what prosecutors say is an unprecedented closed hearing Wednesday at Fort Meade to help her decide how much of Manning's coming trial should be closed to protect national security. An unidentified prosecution witness will testify during that closed hearing in a "dry run. " Defense attorneys say that could allow the judge to find ways to avoid closing the courtroom to the public during the presentation of classified evidence.
NEWS
April 30, 2011 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The intelligence analyst suspected of illegally passing government secrets to the WikiLeaks website has been found competent to stand trial, the Army said yesterday. Army spokesman Gary Tallman said a panel of experts completed its medical and mental evaluation of Pfc. Bradley Manning on April 22, and informed Army officials yesterday of the conclusion. Tallman said no date has been set for the initial court hearing. Manning is suspected of obtaining hundreds of thousands of classified and sensitive documents while serving in Iraq and providing them to the website.
NEWS
June 8, 2012 | By David Dishneau, Associated Press
FORT MEADE, Md. - The U.S. State Department took extraordinary steps to limit harm to foreign relations and individuals after an Army private allegedly sent more than 250,000 classified diplomatic cables to the secret-sharing website WikiLeaks, two agency officials testified at a court-martial hearing Thursday. One group of up to 25 high-ranking officials worked around the clock to try to get ahead of the problem before WikiLeaks began publishing the cables on Nov. 28, 2010, said Rena Bitter, director of the agency's operations center.
NEWS
April 6, 2011 | By Gonzalo Solano, Associated Press
QUITO, Ecuador - Ecuador said Tuesday it was expelling the U.S. ambassador over a 2009 diplomatic cable from her - divulged by WikiLeaks - that said a newly retired police chief had a long history of corruption and speculated that President Rafael Correa was aware of it. Foreign Minister Ricardo Patino announced Ambassador Heather Hodges' expulsion at a news conference. Patino said the ambassador, who was called to his office the previous afternoon, had not explained what led her to suggest in the 2009 cable that Correa knew of "supposed acts of corruption by members of the police leadership, and more specifically the former commander of the institution, Jaime Hurtado Vaca.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2013 | By Jake Coyle, Associated Press
NEW YORK - The Toronto International Film Festival will open with the WikiLeaks drama The Fifth Estate and showcase the much-anticipated adaptation of Tracy Letts' Pulitzer Prize-winning play August: Osage County . The festival, which runs Sept. 5-15, has long been a launching pad for Hollywood's fall season and Oscar contenders. This year's lineup, much of which was announced Tuesday, features films starring George Clooney, Matthew McConaughey, Sandra Bullock, Colin Firth, and Nicole Kidman.
NEWS
April 27, 2012 | By David Dishneau, Associated Press
FORT MEADE, Md. - A military judge refused on Thursday to dismiss the most serious charge against an Army private accused in the biggest leak of government secrets in U.S. history. Col. Denise Lind rejected a defense motion to throw out the charge of "aiding the enemy" during a pretrial hearing for Pfc. Bradley Manning. The charge carries a maximum penalty of life in prison. It was one of several motions seeking to dismiss some or all of the charges, but Lind left all 22 counts against Manning in place.
NEWS
April 29, 2011 | By John Milburn, Associated Press
FORT LEAVENWORTH, Kan. - The Army private accused of passing classified documents to WikiLeaks was cleared Thursday to live alongside other inmates at a Kansas military prison, a dramatic change from his previous quarters in a Virginia Marine Corps brig where he spent 23 hours a day alone in his cell. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning passed the lengthy physical and psychiatric evaluation given to new inmates at the Fort Leavenworth prison and received final clearance just before a midday media tour of the facility, Lt. Col. Dawn Hilton said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 26, 2016 | By Tricia Nadolny, Steve Bohnel, Erin Serpico and Vibha Kannan, STAFF WRITERS
An environmental advocate dressed in a furry, head-to-clawed-paw polar bear suit defied Philadelphia's staggering heat wave on Sunday and prepared to join thousands of more comfortably dressed protesters at the March for a Clean Energy Revolution. The polar bear made it to the end, not only in costume but on message! #CleanEnergyMarch pic.twitter.com/nEDXXspDNf — Tricia L. Nadolny (@TriciaNadolny) July 24, 2016 The march, aimed at banning the natural gas drilling practice known as fracking, promised thousands of participants from all 50 states on the eve of the Democratic National Convention.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2016 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Inis Nua's production of The Radicalisation of Bradley Manning , is the American premiere of a play by Welsh writer Tim Rice. It takes up a fascinating subject: how and why a young soldier used his technological expertise to send hundreds of thousands of classified documents about military events in Iraq to WikiLeaks. The play offers these binaries to ponder: Hero or traitor? Manning was both nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize and sentenced to 35 years in a maximum-security prison.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2013 | By Jake Coyle, Associated Press
NEW YORK - The Toronto International Film Festival will open with the WikiLeaks drama The Fifth Estate and showcase the much-anticipated adaptation of Tracy Letts' Pulitzer Prize-winning play August: Osage County . The festival, which runs Sept. 5-15, has long been a launching pad for Hollywood's fall season and Oscar contenders. This year's lineup, much of which was announced Tuesday, features films starring George Clooney, Matthew McConaughey, Sandra Bullock, Colin Firth, and Nicole Kidman.
NEWS
July 17, 2013 | Associated Press
FORT MEADE, Md. - Lawyers for the Army private who leaked a trove of classified government documents urged a judge Monday to dismiss a charge he aided the enemy, saying prosecutors failed to prove Pfc. Bradley Manning intended for the information to fall into enemy hands. The charge is the most serious and carries the most severe punishment - life in prison - in the case against Manning, who has acknowledged sending hundreds of thousands of documents to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | By Jim Heintz, Associated Press
MOSCOW - The WikiLeaks secret-spilling site on Tuesday said NSA leaker Edward Snowden has not yet formally accepted asylum in Venezuela, trying to put to rest growing confusion over whether he had taken up the country's offer. Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro has offered asylum to Snowden and says his country received a request from the former NSA systems analyst. But Snowden, who is believed to be in a Moscow airport's transit zone, has applied for asylum in other countries as well, and it is not clear how easy it would be for him to travel to the Latin American country.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Kathy Lally and Anthony Faiola, Washington Post
MOSCOW - Edward Snowden, sought on espionage charges after bringing secret U.S. surveillance programs to light, receded still further into the shadows Monday as the United States strenuously called on Russia to turn him over for prosecution. Snowden, 30, a former government contractor who has not been seen in public since he was said to have arrived in Moscow on Sunday after slipping out of Hong Kong, set off a flurry of diplomatic activity around the globe as frustrated U.S. officials tried to interrupt his flight to asylum.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
ALEX GIBNEY'S Wikileaks/Julian Assange/Bradley Manning documentary is a lively digital-age epic with characters as troubled as they are troublesome. Called "We Steal Secrets: The Story of Wikileaks," the new film examines the main players with commendable rigor - an achievement in itself, given the polarizing nature of the men involved. But the movie has an even bigger reach - describing a squirming, encroaching digital Blob that's grown beyond the capacity of any entity or individual to control.
NEWS
May 7, 2013 | By David Dishneau, Associated Press
FORT MEADE, Md. - Government secrecy reaches a new level this week in the court-martial of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, an intelligence analyst who sent 700,000 classified U.S. documents to the WikiLeaks website. A military judge, Col. Denise Lind, has ordered what prosecutors say is an unprecedented closed hearing Wednesday at Fort Meade to help her decide how much of Manning's coming trial should be closed to protect national security. An unidentified prosecution witness will testify during that closed hearing in a "dry run. " Defense attorneys say that could allow the judge to find ways to avoid closing the courtroom to the public during the presentation of classified evidence.
NEWS
November 30, 2012 | TRIBUNE WASHINGTON BUREAU
FORT MEADE, MD. - Pfc. Bradley Manning swiveled in the witness chair, smiling and occasionally talking over his lawyer. In his Army dress-blue uniform, he appeared even younger than his 24 years. It was difficult to reconcile the bespectacled Manning's relaxed, almost chatty demeanor with the vast charges against him - perpetrating one of the biggest leaks of classified material in U.S. history. Manning is accused of providing the anti-secrecy Internet group WikiLeaks with hundreds of thousands of U.S. diplomatic cables and classified war logs from Afghanistan and Iraq while based in Baghdad as a military intelligence analyst in 2009 and 2010.
NEWS
November 28, 2012 | By David Dishneau, Associated Press
FORT MEADE, Md. - An Army private charged in the biggest security breach in U.S. history is trying to avoid trial by claiming he was punished enough when he was locked up alone in a small cell and forced to sleep naked for several nights. A pretrial hearing began Tuesday in the case of Pfc. Bradley Manning, charged with spilling secrets to the website WikiLeaks. Supporters packed the courtroom at Fort Meade, many in black T-shirts with the word Truth in white lettering. A retired Marine Corps colonel denied a three-star general directed Manning's pretrial confinement.
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