FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1997 | By William Ricchini, FOR THE INQUIRER
"You still love rock and roll," crooned front man Jeff Tweedy, opening Wilco's show at the Trocadero Friday night with "Misunderstood," the lead track from Wilco's 19-song double album, Being There. It was a fitting beginning to a show that played like a tribute to rock's grand tradition. Tweedy isn't shy about wearing both his heart and his influence on his sleeve. Wilco blazed through a diverse set of material that gave nods to Exile on Main Street-era Rolling Stones on "Casino Queen," the Big Pink era of the Band on "Kingpin," and Pet Sounds-Beach Boys on "Outtasite (Outta Mind)
NEWS
February 25, 2008 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
On Saturday night at the Tower Theater, Wilco was merely great. The qualifying "merely" is hard to explain, because, on its face, the show had all the makings of a bragging-rights concert experience. Totally jazzed, way-sold-out crowd? Check. Storied, acoustically friendly venue? Check. Legendary opening act, one John Doe, tragically ignored by most in favor of the beer line? Check. Must-see headliners with a live rep for fireworks ready to throw down? Check. Perhaps the only thing missing was the element of surprise.
NEWS
May 15, 2007 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Being regarded as America's most important rock-and-roll band must get overwhelming after a while. Sure, Jeff Tweedy asked for it, with a series of albums that telegraphed Wilco's artistic seriousness, from the double-disc Being There in 1996 to the avant-noise experiments on A Ghost Is Born in 2004. But on Sky Blue Sky (Nonesuch . ), the Chicago sextet's sixth album, Tweedy sounds relieved not to have to worry about his reputation anymore. Instead of coming off like an art project - a weakness of both the migraine-inspired A Ghost Is Born and its ballyhooed predecessor, 2002's Yankee Hotel Foxtrot - Sky Blue Sky is content with the sound of five musicians standing around a room, enjoying playing music together.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2004 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
After months of struggling with panic attacks and increasing dependence on prescription painkillers for his chronic migraines, Wilco singer-songwriter Jeff Tweedy felt like a cliche: "I didn't want to admit to the world that I was the stereotype" of the rock-and-roll addict. "I probably could have gotten help sooner if I wasn't so appalled by the connotation," Tweedy says from his Chicago home, explaining the health crisis that delayed the release of Wilco's jarring fifth album, A Ghost Is Born (Nonesuch . . out of four stars)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1999 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
There was a moment during Wilco's sold-out show at the Theatre of Living Arts Monday night when if you had turned your back, you would have sworn you were listening to Dylan and The Band circa The Basement Tapes. The song was "She's a Jar" from Summer Teeth, Wilco's best and most eccentric recording to date. Amid the warbling swells of calliope and the hazy lyricism, Jeff Tweedy, Wilco's frontman, struck the classic Dylanesque pose with acoustic guitar and harmonica. Those are mighty big shoes to fill, but then again Wilco is the Bigfoot of the current roots-rock scene.
NEWS
October 1, 2001 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Near the end of "I Am Trying To Break Your Heart," the first song Wilco performed Saturday at the Electric Factory, guitarist and singer Jeff Tweedy dropped to his knees and began turning dials on sound-shaping devices. He soon enough changed the song, one of several from the band's unreleased new work, Yankee Hotel Foxtrot: The melody dissolved into distorted machine noise; its singer-songwriterly proclamation became aural chaos. It was a fitting start. In the years since 1999's acclaimed Summerteeth, Tweedy has evidently grown restless with rock business as usual.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1995 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It took Wilco a long while to get going at the Theater of Living Arts on Thursday night. The first hour of the roots-rock quintet's show was flat and poorly paced. Beginning with a slowed-down cover of Doug Sahm's "Give Back the Key to My Heart," the group couldn't gather any momentum, and it didn't help that a bad sound mix rendered Max Johnston's fiddle, banjo and Dobro almost inaudible. Save for the stutter-step "Too Far Apart" and John Stirrat's yearning "It's Just That Simple," none of the warm-hearted, country-tinged tunes from the band's A.M. (Sire/Reprise)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
It's not easy for a rock band to maintain creative momentum over a decade and a half and, truth be told, Wilco's career has had its ebbs and flows since the group led by Jeff Tweedy released its engagingly rootsy debut, A.M. , in 1995. With its last two efforts - 2007's bucolic Sky Blue Sky and 2009's ingratiating Wilco (The Album) - the Chicago sextet seemed to have settled into a comfortable middle age. A perfectly pleasant bunch of guys to hang around with, but with their daring days behind them.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1997 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER and Tom Moon
When it first occurred to Jeff Tweedy to call Wilco's second album Being There, he wasn't thinking of the 1979 Peter Sellers movie about a simple gardener whose every utterance is misunderstood as a statement of great profundity. The former coleader of much-mythologized country-punk band Uncle Tupelo simply hit upon the title for his group's stylistically expansive double-CD follow-up to their 1995 roots-rock debut, A.M., because "being there" is "what music is about, and what being in a band and making a record is about.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2003 | By Patrick Berkery FOR THE INQUIRER
Since his departure from Wilco in 2001, Jay Bennett has kept busy. The multi-instrumentalist/singer-songwriter teamed last year with longtime friend Edward Burch to release The Palace at 4 A.M., where the beauty of his mixed-in-heaven production and leathery voice singing what sound like undiscovered gems from Elvis Costello and Rockpile doesn't really hit you until the third or fourth listen. In between constant touring and recording an acoustic version of Palace called Palace 1919, Bennett has found time to produce other artists, such as the Sun. The Columbus, Ohio, group's debut EP, Love & Death (Reprise)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 21, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Jeff Tweedy has made a lot of records, but the front man for the esteemed American rock band Wilco (and before that, coleader of alt-country outfit Uncle Tupelo) has never put out an honest-to-goodness solo album. That will still be true come Tuesday, when Sukierae (dBpm ), the 20-song set credited to Tweedy (no Jeff), will be released. That's because although Tweedy performed almost all of the music himself, another family member also played a key role. Spencer Tweedy, his 18-year-old son, played drums on the double disc - as he will Sunday night, when Tweedy, the band, headlines the Merriam Theater.
NEWS
May 2, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Since his start in the late 1970s on the Los Angeles creative improvisational music scene, guitarist Nels Cline has moved among avant-garde jazz, noise rock, and crepuscular ambient sound. He may be best known for joining the alt-Americana ensemble Wilco in 2004. But his wide-ranging explorations continue, including Brazilian esoterica and dissonance with the CD Macroscope by the Nels Cline Singers. Cline has an especially close relationship with Mark Christman's Ars Nova Workshop (ANW)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The freewheelin' Bob Dylan is always good for a surprise on stage. The songwriting sage, now 72, has perplexed concertgoers by garbling his treasured lyrics and murkily arranging his hits into unrecognizable entities for better and worse. His never-ending tour, too, has had its share of left turns, like its summer of concerts at baseball fields. This season, Dylan's touring twist came by inviting his spiritual indie-rocking children, Wilco and My Morning Jacket, to his Americanarama Festival, which made a much-anticipated stop Sunday at Camden's Susquehanna Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2013
Diplo Wesley Pentz, also known as Diplo, used Philadelphia as the launching pad for a career as DJ/producer and dance-floor archaeologist that has yet to reach its apogee. To say he's made the A-list would be an understatement: He's nominated for producer of the year at this year's Grammys for collaborations with Usher, Snoop Lion, Justin Bieber, and others, and Free the Universe , his second album as half of the electro-reggae-dancehall conglomeration Major Lazer, comes out Feb. 19. This weekend, Diplo, now L.A.-based, comes back to the area, and this time, he'll quite literally be employing a launching pad. In his marathon one-day "Trap Hawk Down" tour - the name is inspired by Mark Bowden's nonfiction book Black Hawk Down , originally published as a series in The Inquirer - Diplo will play Ottobar in Baltimore, Soundgarden Hall in Philadelphia, the Borgata in Atlantic City, and the Westway in New York, all in the course of 12 hours.
NEWS
July 23, 2012 | By Jonathan Valania and FOR THE INQUIRER
It has often been said that Wilco is the American Radiohead — an edgy, 21st-century rock band whose audience only seems to grow the more they challenge it. Less remarked on is the more obvious fact that they are also the new Grateful Dead — populist guarantors of the heartland verities of cosmic Americana. So it makes perfect sense that Wilco should headline the second night of the XPoNential Music Festival, curated by WXPN, a radio station that has astutely bridged the divide between edgy and crunchy and, like Wilco and Radiohead, commands a mass audience that is more a community than a crowd.
NEWS
January 23, 2012
Conan (11 p.m., TBS) - Casey Anderson; Wilco performs. Late Show With David Letterman (11:35 p.m., CBS3) - Mark Wahlberg; Heather Morris; Snow Patrol performs. The Tonight Show With Jay Leno (11:35 p.m., NBC10) - Michelle Williams; Josh Lucas; Chris Cornell performs. Jimmy Kimmel Live (midnight, 6ABC) - Kiefer Sutherland; Bear Grylls; Young the Giant performs.
NEWS
December 11, 2011
Ry Cooder Pull Up Some Dust and Sit Down (Nonesuch)   F-ed Up David Comes to Life (Matador)   Girls Father, Son, Holy Ghost (True Panther Sounds)   Jay-Z and Kanye West Watch the Throne (Roc-A-Fella)   The Roots undun (Def Jam)   Tune-Yards w h o k i l l (4AD)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
It's not easy for a rock band to maintain creative momentum over a decade and a half and, truth be told, Wilco's career has had its ebbs and flows since the group led by Jeff Tweedy released its engagingly rootsy debut, A.M. , in 1995. With its last two efforts - 2007's bucolic Sky Blue Sky and 2009's ingratiating Wilco (The Album) - the Chicago sextet seemed to have settled into a comfortable middle age. A perfectly pleasant bunch of guys to hang around with, but with their daring days behind them.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|