CollectionsWild Turkey
IN THE NEWS

Wild Turkey

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1989 | By Claire Gerber, Special to The Inquirer
This may be the wrong day to tell you, but there are hundreds of turkeys out there, and they're wild. And, it being Thanksgiving weekend, the least you can do is go see a real wild turkey - not the kind they pop into the grocery cooler, but the kind that would have made a Puritan smile. Wild turkeys are back. They're in South Jersey after an absence of almost a century - during which they had been killed off by hunters and crowded out by metropolitan Philadelphians. In the hope that the birds would again become part of the native population, the New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife imported 22 turkeys in the winter of 1977.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
ROAMING THE STREETS of West Philadelphia is a creature so fowl, one that has been cooped up for so long, that no one is sure what it's capable of doing. Armed with spurs and with moves like Jagger's, he struts down sidewalks, sleeps in trees and searches for nuts. He is the Wild Turkey of West Philly, who fled his home at Bartram's Garden after a duel with his brother in early April and has been wandering the streets of Philly like a bad parody of a Springsteen song. Even West Philly residents like Claire King, accustomed to seeing everything, have been shocked by this fantastic fowl.
SPORTS
June 7, 1992 | By Michael Bamberger, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The press release says, "A good turkey caller must know the turkey language and convey it with feeling and contentment. " A page later it says that the turkey sandwich may someday "topple the hamburger as the king of the American fast food. " Another page lists the Top Ten Turkeys of 1991: David Duke, Clarence Thomas, Donald Trump, George Bush, Jim and Tammy Bakker, Saddam Hussein, Jimmy Swaggart, John Sununu, Dan Quayle and Ted Kennedy. You call the public relations man. You want to tell him that that's 11 names.
NEWS
May 3, 2013
TURKEY FACTS: * One of the first ancient cities to use the name Philadelphia was in what is present-day Turkey. The city now is called Alasehir. * Philadelphia's own Benjamin Franklin wanted the turkey, not the bald eagle, to be the national bird. He once wrote that the turkey, "though a little vain and silly," is "a bird of courage. " * Turkeys can fly. * Turkeys sleep in trees at night. * A turkey's diet consists mainly of seeds, insects and nuts. * The snood on a turkey is the bit of red flesh that grows from a turkey's forehead over its beak.
NEWS
November 26, 2009
About 45 million turkeys will be consumed today for the greater good, so let us pause to reflect upon one bird that avoided the usual fate. Her name is Tammy the Turnpike Turkey. She's an 11-pound wild turkey from New Jersey (no, not all wild turkey in the Garden State comes in a bottle). Tammy lived at the toll plaza at exit 14B of the New Jersey Turnpike. You know - the exit after Bayonne, but before the Holland Tunnel? It's not your usual wild gobbler habitat. How she got there, nobody knows.
NEWS
November 25, 1999 | By Karen Davis
The wild turkey the early Europeans and colonists encountered was not the bird that dominates 20th-century hunters' talk. In anecdote after anecdote from the 17th through the 19th centuries, the wild turkey was characterized as showing an almost Disneylike friendliness toward people. Wild turkeys, as the first settlers found them, walked right up. Sadly, the birds were likely to be met with a bang for their bravery. Here are some examples of early encounters between Man and Bird, as told by the settlers: "They came so close to people they could be shot with a pistol.
NEWS
December 6, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Commentary What does a moose have to do with Philadelphia? They don't even have one at the Zoo. And yet Phil E. Moose is one of three ideas the new Sixers owners are offering fans for a new mascot. The other two go the obvious Ben Franklin route with Big Ben and B. Franklin Dogg. You can vote online at sixers.com for any of the three. But not for: "None of the above" or "How are these better than Hip Hop?" This is the best they could do? When the new hockey franchise pondered nicknames, they asked the fans for suggestions, before choosing Flyers.
NEWS
January 4, 1993 | By Vanessa Williams, with reports from Inquirer wire services
WILD KINGDOM I: ROBODOGS The newest in doggie accessories: implanted computer chips to keep track of dogs taking part in this year's Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. Organizers of the event said chips about the size of a grain of rice would be implanted in the dogs to help officials detect illegal attempts to substitute dogs during the 1,000-mile race across Alaska in March. The chips are implanted under the back of a dog's neck using a syringe and a fat, hollow-tipped needle.
NEWS
November 22, 1998 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Tradition holds that wild turkey was the entree at the first Thanksgiving dinner, given by the Pilgrims in gratitude for surviving the initial winter at Plymouth Colony. The custom was promoted with a vengeance for almost 30 years in Hatfield, during a time when the borough was popularly called "Turkeytown. " According to a history of Hatfield Borough found in the 1983 work, Montgomery County: The Second Hundred Years, large, wholesale turkey auctions were first held in the early 1890s.
FOOD
November 18, 1992 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Thanksgiving remains the American holiday with the most tradition-bound meal. And turkey still maintains center stage at that feast. The original Thanksgiving menu, according to historians and archaeologists, included not just wild turkey but also waterfowl, venison and fish - served with a dozen or more vegetables. Of course, back in 1621, the first settlers and the natives partied for three days to celebrate the Pilgrims' landing in Plymouth. For contemporary revelers, getting a free turkey this year won't be quite as easy as it was last Thanksgiving.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 3, 2013
TURKEY FACTS: * One of the first ancient cities to use the name Philadelphia was in what is present-day Turkey. The city now is called Alasehir. * Philadelphia's own Benjamin Franklin wanted the turkey, not the bald eagle, to be the national bird. He once wrote that the turkey, "though a little vain and silly," is "a bird of courage. " * Turkeys can fly. * Turkeys sleep in trees at night. * A turkey's diet consists mainly of seeds, insects and nuts. * The snood on a turkey is the bit of red flesh that grows from a turkey's forehead over its beak.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
ROAMING THE STREETS of West Philadelphia is a creature so fowl, one that has been cooped up for so long, that no one is sure what it's capable of doing. Armed with spurs and with moves like Jagger's, he struts down sidewalks, sleeps in trees and searches for nuts. He is the Wild Turkey of West Philly, who fled his home at Bartram's Garden after a duel with his brother in early April and has been wandering the streets of Philly like a bad parody of a Springsteen song. Even West Philly residents like Claire King, accustomed to seeing everything, have been shocked by this fantastic fowl.
NEWS
July 13, 2012 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
While feeding black bears is verboten in New Jersey, state law is silent on whether it's OK to provide breakfast to a wild turkey. So when a Burlington County community began getting complaints about wild turkeys attacking joggers, the town had to make its own decision. On Tuesday, the Hainesport Township Council passed a rare ordinance that bans the feeding of turkeys. Violators could be fined up to $2,000. Township Solicitor Ted Costa said he could not find any other towns with such a ban, so he modeled it after local laws that prohibit feeding of Canada geese, a bird that increasingly is a suburban nuisance.
NEWS
June 26, 2012 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a semi-wooded Burlington County suburb, a flock of wild turkeys is harassing walkers and joggers who have been seen fighting back with a tennis racket, a hastily removed belt, a swinging handbag, and sticks. For at least three years, a dozen turkeys have roamed the streets and lawns of Hainesport without incident, according to residents who enjoy watching them, and, in some cases, feeding them. "They're part of what's happening here," said Ted Barto, whose horse and chicken farm and adjacent lawn are visited frequently by the 15- to 20-pound birds.
NEWS
December 6, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Commentary What does a moose have to do with Philadelphia? They don't even have one at the Zoo. And yet Phil E. Moose is one of three ideas the new Sixers owners are offering fans for a new mascot. The other two go the obvious Ben Franklin route with Big Ben and B. Franklin Dogg. You can vote online at sixers.com for any of the three. But not for: "None of the above" or "How are these better than Hip Hop?" This is the best they could do? When the new hockey franchise pondered nicknames, they asked the fans for suggestions, before choosing Flyers.
NEWS
November 23, 2011 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wild turkeys are invading South Jersey neighborhoods, boldly trekking across lawns and roads as if Thanksgiving wasn't looming. An angry tom chased a curious photographer away from a flock of six recently in Hainesport, shaking its head and wattle and chirping incessantly. It clearly was claiming Deacon Road, on the edge of a woods in Burlington County, as its territory. Up until 10 days ago, a flock of 100 to 200 roamed a tiny housing cluster in Deptford, Gloucester County.
NEWS
November 22, 2010
AT A TURKEY farm in a mid-Atlantic state: "Tilly?" "What is it, Tom?" "I have a funny feeling, Tilly. " "Tom, do you know what the 25th is?" "Thursday. Right?" "Tom, it's Thanksgiving," says Tilly. "Uh-oh. Does that mean . . . ?" "Yes. Decimation Day. The slaughter has already begun. Haven't you noticed the big trucks rolling out of here night and day?" "I wondered why my mood ring was showing black. " Tilly gobbles and pecks at the ground.
NEWS
November 26, 2009
About 45 million turkeys will be consumed today for the greater good, so let us pause to reflect upon one bird that avoided the usual fate. Her name is Tammy the Turnpike Turkey. She's an 11-pound wild turkey from New Jersey (no, not all wild turkey in the Garden State comes in a bottle). Tammy lived at the toll plaza at exit 14B of the New Jersey Turnpike. You know - the exit after Bayonne, but before the Holland Tunnel? It's not your usual wild gobbler habitat. How she got there, nobody knows.
NEWS
November 22, 2001 | By Claire Gerber
This may be the wrong day to tell you, but there are hundreds of turkeys out there - and they're wild. And, it being Thanksgiving week, the least you can do is go see a real turkey. Not the kind they pop into the grocery cooler, but the kind that would have made a Puritan smile. Wild turkeys are back. They're in South Jersey after an absence of almost a century, during which they had been just about killed off by hunters and crowded out by metropolitan Philadelphia. In the hope that the birds would again become part of the native population, the New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife imported 22 turkeys in the winter of 1977.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|