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NEWS
April 19, 2011 | By April Castro, Associated Press
AUSTIN, Texas - A wildfire in Austin that authorities say they believe was sparked by a homeless man's campfire burned 100 acres and damaged at least 18 homes - a number fire officials expected Monday would rise. Austin Fire Department spokesman Chayer Smith said he expected the figure to change "substantially upward" once firefighters can survey the area. Authorities suspect a homeless man started the fire by lighting a campfire to cook amid strong winds and tinder-dry conditions that have left firefighters battling a spate of wildfires threatening communities across Texas.
NEWS
April 2, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Once again, the forecast mentions both fire and ice, though temperatures could hardly be called extreme. Dryness and wind today could conspire to create conditions conducive to wildfires, even with a high of about 60, the National Weather Service advises. "Red Flag Warnings may be needed later today," according to the service. The threat applies to Southeastern Pennsylvania, most of New Jersey and all of Delaware. Overnight, temperatures could fall into the low 30s, potentially producing areas of frost across the region, except for Philadelphia and Delaware County, according to a frost advisory.
NEWS
September 6, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES - Tinder-dry conditions provided ample fuel for at least three wildfires burning across Southern California yesterday as firefighters launched a massive aerial assault to try to halt the blazes' spread. The largest fire was the so-called Canyon Fire, burning near Tehachapi in Kern County. It was sparked a day earlier when a single-engine Cessna plane crashed. As of last night, the blaze had chewed its way through more than 4,700 acres of rugged brush and pine, said Tom Piranio, a California Department of Fire and Forestry Protection spokesman.
NEWS
July 3, 2002
In the last 10 months, we've become more accustomed to seeing firefighters as heroes. Now, how "gut-wrenching," as one official put it, to see two of them - a Forest Service worker and an Arizona contract firefighter - accused of igniting two of the summer's largest, most damaging Western wildfires. . . . In recent times, Americans also have seen the occasional nurse who murdered patients; too many priests who violated their calling; greedy corporate chieftains who lied, bilked companies and hid their doings; accountant watchdogs who became lap dogs . . . stock advisors with financial conflicts.
NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON - Those columns of smoke rising Friday over hundreds of acres of forest and grassy areas of Burlington, Cumberland, Ocean, and Monmouth Counties weren't caused by wildfires. They were set - part of the New Jersey Forest Fire Service's efforts to head off wildfires, state officials said Friday. Blazes were set across South and Central New Jersey, including Washington Township in Burlington County; Manchester and Eagleswood Townships in Ocean County; Millville, Maurice, Commercial, and Downe Townships in Cumberland; and Monmouth Battlefield in Monmouth County.
NEWS
August 16, 2012 | By Jessie L. Bonner, Associated Press
FEATHERVILLE, Idaho - Across the West, dozens of fires fueled by searing heat, dry weather and strong winds have added up to misery for weary residents who already are fed up with one of the region's worst fire seasons in decades. On Wednesday, hundreds of residents of two small Idaho towns were packing their belongings and clearing out of the way of a massive wildfire burning in a gulch a few miles away and expected to hit town later this week. Wildfires also have started or intensified in recent days in Washington, Northern California, and Nevada as the West's high heat and dry conditions keep fire crews busier than usual.
SPORTS
October 24, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
The BYU at San Diego State football game scheduled for Saturday night has been postponed until Dec. 1 because Qualcomm Stadium is being used as an evacuation center for residents displaced by wildfires. "There is a far greater priority than sporting events in the San Diego area at this time," Mountain West Conference commissioner Craig Thompson said in a statement. "The focus should be on emergency response and resources, and getting the community back on its feet. Our thoughts are with our colleagues at San Diego State University, as well as everyone who has been affected by this disaster.
NEWS
May 3, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON - Spring is the busy season for the New Jersey Forest Fire Service. From Jan. 1 through April 26, it responded to 324 wildfires that burned 442 acres - and firefighters are ready for more blazes in the coming days. This week, the wildfire risk is rated "high" across the state, and it will likely heighten as the temperature rises and conditions get drier, wildfire experts said Friday. Leaf litter and debris in the Pinelands and other forested areas serve as the perfect fuel to feed the flames, said officials, who have been calling on the public to be especially cautious during this period.
SPORTS
October 27, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
Chased from their homes and practice fields by deadly wildfires, the San Diego Chargers headed home last night and will play the Houston Texans at Qualcomm Stadium tomorrow as scheduled. "That's the best news I've heard since this happened," running back LaDainian Tomlinson said. "I never thought I'd feel so good just going home. " The team worked out for a final time at the Arizona Cardinals' facility in Tempe yesterday afternoon, then boarded buses to the airport for the flight to San Diego.
NEWS
August 31, 2012 | By Matthew Brown, Associated Press
BILLINGS, Mont. - Rapidly expanding wildfires across a broad swath of southern Montana have caused injuries and burned homes, buildings and vehicles, authorities said Thursday, as firefighters struggled to contain the flames amid hazardous conditions. The precise toll of the latest spate of fires to hit the state remained uncertain. But at least three evacuation orders were in place and well over 150 homes were threatened by blazes that in some cases burned unchecked. High temperatures and erratic winds were forecast to make the fight more difficult.
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NEWS
April 30, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, INQUIRER WRITER
A blaze on more than 100 acres kindled and raged earlier this month in Wharton State Forest of the New Jersey Pinelands. With a plume rising thousands of feet and a dull, unmistakable roar, it was a fire termed major by state woodlands standards, leaving hikers covering their faces to escape the smoke. The scion of a family fighting blazes in the woods since the state fire service started more than 100 years ago, warden Mike Achey and his men knew well what they needed to do. Using the natural barrier of a stream, they went on to light backfires so the advancing flames would hit a border devoid of forest fuel - containment as strategy.
NEWS
May 3, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON - Spring is the busy season for the New Jersey Forest Fire Service. From Jan. 1 through April 26, it responded to 324 wildfires that burned 442 acres - and firefighters are ready for more blazes in the coming days. This week, the wildfire risk is rated "high" across the state, and it will likely heighten as the temperature rises and conditions get drier, wildfire experts said Friday. Leaf litter and debris in the Pinelands and other forested areas serve as the perfect fuel to feed the flames, said officials, who have been calling on the public to be especially cautious during this period.
NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON - Those columns of smoke rising Friday over hundreds of acres of forest and grassy areas of Burlington, Cumberland, Ocean, and Monmouth Counties weren't caused by wildfires. They were set - part of the New Jersey Forest Fire Service's efforts to head off wildfires, state officials said Friday. Blazes were set across South and Central New Jersey, including Washington Township in Burlington County; Manchester and Eagleswood Townships in Ocean County; Millville, Maurice, Commercial, and Downe Townships in Cumberland; and Monmouth Battlefield in Monmouth County.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Alicia Chang and Seth Borenstein, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - There's a dangerous but basic equation behind the killer Yarnell Hill wildfire and other blazes raging across the West this summer: More heat, more drought, more fuel, and more people in the way are adding up to increasingly ferocious fires. Scientists say a hotter planet will only increase the risk. More than two dozen wildland fires are burning from Alaska to New Mexico, fueled by triple-digit temperatures and arid conditions. In the Arizona mountain town of Yarnell, a blaze apparently sparked by lightning killed 19 members of an elite firefighting squad who had deployed their emergency shelters a week ago when erratic monsoon winds sent flames racing in their direction.
NEWS
July 4, 2013 | By Lenny Bernstein, Washington Post
PRESCOTT, Ariz. - Cory Moser was battling the Yarnell fire when word came that the Granite Mountain Hotshots had been overrun by the flames. The Prescott Fire Department division chief sped to the scene, where he found a "moonscape" of bare ground, rocks cracked and chipped from the intense heat of the flames. Moser, who wound up spending the night minding the bodies of close friends and coworkers, said the desolate scene is one clue that whatever killed the 19 elite members of his fire department may well turn out to have been an unexpected "black swan" event - a rare turn of the weather, conditions, or luck that no one expected or could have prevented.
NEWS
July 3, 2013
PRESCOTT, Ariz. - Trapped by a wildfire that exploded tenfold in a matter of hours, a crack team of firefighting "Hotshots" broke out their portable emergency shelters and rushed to climb into the foil-lined, heat-resistant bags before the flames swept over them. By the time the blaze had passed, 19 men lay dead in the nation's biggest loss of firefighters in a wildfire in 80 years. The tragedy Sunday evening all but wiped out the 20-member Granite Mountain Hotshots, a unit based in Prescott, authorities said yesterday as the last of the bodies were retrieved from the mountain in the town of Yarnell.
NEWS
July 2, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
YARNELL, Ariz. - A fast-moving wildfire killed 19 firefighters Sunday afternoon after the blaze raced through an Arizona community, a state forestry official told the Associated Press. Forestry spokesman Art Morrison said the firefighters were caught by the fire near the central Arizona town of Yarnell, about 85 miles northwest of Phoenix. He said the firefighters were forced to deploy their fire shelters, tent-like structures meant to shield firefighters from flames and heat. Earlier Sunday, the 2,000-acre wildfire prompted evacuations of 50 homes in several communities.
NEWS
July 2, 2013 | Associated Press
YARNELL, Ariz. - A fast-moving wildfire killed 19 firefighters Sunday afternoon after the blaze raced through an Arizona community, a state forestry official told the Associated Press. Forestry spokesman Art Morrison said the firefighters were caught by the fire near the central Arizona town of Yarnell, about 85 miles northwest of Phoenix. He said the firefighters were forced to deploy their fire shelters, tent-like structures meant to shield firefighters from flames and heat. Earlier Sunday, the 2,000-acre wildfire prompted evacuations of 50 homes in several communities.
NEWS
June 23, 2013 | By Jeri Clausing, Associated Press
DEL NORTE, Colo. - A massive wildfire threatening a tourist region in southwestern Colorado has grown to nearly 60 square miles, but officials said Saturday that the erratic blaze had slowed and they were optimistic they could protect the town of South Fork. The fire's rapid advance prompted more than 400 evacuations Friday, and it could be days before people are allowed back into their homes, cabins, and RV parks, fire crew spokeswoman Laura McConnell said. South Fork Mayor Kenneth Brooke estimated that up to 1,500 of the town's permanent residents and summer visitors were evacuated.
NEWS
June 17, 2013 | By P. Solomon Banda, Associated Press
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. - A Colorado sheriff said firefighters "are getting the upper hand" on the most destructive wildfire in state history Saturday, an announcement that came as authorities gained a clearer picture of the grim landscape the blaze has left behind. No additional homes were destroyed as fire crews expanded containment lines, El Paso County Sheriff Terry Maketa said. Also, there were no new reports of injury or death, he said. The fire that exploded Tuesday outside of Colorado Springs, amid record-setting heat and tinder-dry conditions, has destroyed nearly 500 homes and killed two people, whose bodies were found inside their garage Thursday, their car doors open as though they had been about to flee.
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