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Wildflowers

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LIVING
October 21, 1994 | By A. Cort Sinnes, FOR THE INQUIRER
The time may have come to give that lawn in your back yard a second look. Have your children grown and moved away - taking the baseball bats, footballs and badminton set with them? Do you have things you'd rather do on Saturday morning besides mowing, edging and maintaining the lawn? The maintenance demanded by grass - weekly mowing, regular watering, feeding, and weed- and disease-control - may not be worth it if the only thing you do with the lawn is look at it. As an alternative, many people have replaced their lawns with wildflowers and a meandering path.
NEWS
April 28, 2000 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
We live in an era of lame excuses. There was no controlling legal authority . . . there was a vast right-wing conspiracy . . . the weapon was pointing down and the safety was on . . . . Art imitates life in "Wildflowers," a movie that features one of the worst excuses for bad behavior I think I've ever heard. It involves a mother trying to explain to her daughter why she abandoned her at birth, during some '60s wingding. Her explanation goes like this: "I thought if I left you at that party, then people would take care of you. Everyone around wanted babies.
NEWS
June 21, 1990 | By Tom Linafelt, Special to The Inquirer
Commuters beware: Don't stop to smell the flowers. And don't even think about picking them. Motorists along Interstate 95, the Schuylkill Expressway and Route 202 who stop to pick wildflowers along the highways face fines of up to $300 for picking vegetation within a state right-of-way, plus additional fines for stopping along a state highway. The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation didn't intend to create a safety hazard when it planted the wildflowers on five acres in the Philadelphia area last year.
NEWS
July 2, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Mischelle "Raven" Ahmed's first love was named Chimaphila maculata . Ahmed was 10 and walking on a trail near her Absecon home when she came upon the delicate little wildflower, more commonly known as spotted wintergreen. "They were different," she says, noting the species' distinctive striped leaves and pearly flowers. "They weren't something you saw in a garden. " That's less true these days, thanks in part to Ahmed and other advocates of native wildflowers. As the environmental benefits of the plants are more widely publicized, their popularity grows.
FOOD
May 27, 1992 | by Isabel Forgang, New York Daily News
Wildflowers were made for the lazy gardener. These hardy native plants are ideal for anyone who loves colorful flowers but can't - or won't - spare the time to tend to them. But wildflowers have more than low maintenance going for them. Many will bloom all summer long, and attract songbirds and butterflies to enhance the view. "They're a food source for these flying creatures, while cultivated flowers are not," said horticulturist Jim Wilson. Just what are wildflowers?
NEWS
July 2, 1989 | By Garen Meguerian, Special to The Inquirer
The beauty in nature is the last thing that crosses the mind of a person stuck in highway traffic. However, if the Garden Club Federation of Pennsylvania has its way, all Pennsylvania highway motorists will be able to occasionally glance at, if not stop and smell, the flowers. The Garden Club Federation, in cooperation with PennDOT, has undertaken a statewide wildflower-planting program. The planters began by seeding last November at several sites in the five-county Philadelphia area.
NEWS
July 12, 1999 | By Lubna Khan, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Ranger Bob Barker stood on a plain and challenged his group of wildflower enthusiasts to find a dandelion. They had one minute. Barker already had awed them by walking up to a spindly green stem and turning up a pin-size bud to reveal a dazzling yellow flower called a Chinese lantern. And he had amazed them by rescuing an even smaller purple flower, called a heals-all, from a trampling as the group of 13 marched through Nottingham County Park during yesterday's wildflower walk.
NEWS
January 19, 1995 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
With the sky the limit, there's no end to the number of informative and entertaining topics that Greg Edinger can draw upon to put together a winter lecture series for Bowman's Hill Wildflower Preserve. From weather to whales, with some insects and plants thrown in between, the weekly series is designed to draw people with diverse interests and a love of nature. "I want to keep it professional, interesting, informative and topical. . . . Also, it's the time of year when most people think we're closed.
NEWS
May 22, 1988 | By Frank Langfitt, Special to The Inquirer
At twilight, tourists venture out into a broad meadow in Shenandoah National Park and await the daily photo opportunity. Standing amid the high grass and wildflowers, they stare expectantly at the wall of timber that rings the meadow. One after another, the deer slowly emerge from the thicket. The meadow fills with statuesque bucks, delicate does and white-tailed fawns, all seemingly unaffected by the paparazzi. As the tourists close in, flashbulbs pop across the meadow like a scene from a film opening.
NEWS
July 16, 1992 | By Yana Ginburg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The red, crepe paper-like petals of the poppy fluttered in the humid breeze. The blue, fuzzy bachelor's button soaked up the hazy afternoon sunlight. Driving around the cantonment area - the built-up area - of Fort Dix, one could easily imagine Maria Von Trapp running through the brightly colored landscape, yodeling. Over the last three years, 625 acres of grass have been transformed into a sea of tomato red, powder blue and sun-kissed-yellow flowers. The metamorphosis began in 1990 when the base tried to come up with money-saving alternatives to mowing.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 2, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Mischelle "Raven" Ahmed's first love was named Chimaphila maculata . Ahmed was 10 and walking on a trail near her Absecon home when she came upon the delicate little wildflower, more commonly known as spotted wintergreen. "They were different," she says, noting the species' distinctive striped leaves and pearly flowers. "They weren't something you saw in a garden. " That's less true these days, thanks in part to Ahmed and other advocates of native wildflowers. As the environmental benefits of the plants are more widely publicized, their popularity grows.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sometimes, there are so many variations of a single plant out there, the floral marketplace seems like Hollywood: If one Rocky movie's good, five more are better. This is certainly true of echinaceas or coneflowers, which have been hybridized to the point where they don't even look like themselves, and heucheras, often called coral bells. Decades ago they were little known to the public and quite forgettable. Now they come in more than 600 varieties! So it's not your imagination: Coral bells are everywhere.
NEWS
October 28, 2011 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gene Atwell had his reasons for replacing his turf grass with wildflowers. As an American Airlines pilot who's away from home a lot, he figured a meadow might need less maintenance than a lawn. It also has a smaller carbon footprint, which appeals to a guy who flies to Europe and South America for a living. "And wildflowers are just really, really beautiful," he says. But Atwell's neighbors in Doylestown Crossing, an upscale development with traditional landscaping, complained to Doylestown Township.
NEWS
September 20, 2011 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
A garden of gold flutters on the horizon like a mirage. One wave of flowers follows another, a sporadic but exuberant parade of blossoms that readily inspires a smile. Welcome to Cherry Hill's Route 70, where eight miles of wildflowers are abloom between lanes of concrete and 60,000 daily vehicles. "Residents love it; environmentalists love it; I love it," says Mayor Bernie Platt, who championed the pilot plantings, along with State Sen. James Beach (D., Camden). The effort cost between $8,000 and $10,000, all of it from donations, including from township police officers and firefighters.
NEWS
August 19, 2011 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
A meadow in August is a splendid thing. This one, at Bowman's Hill Wildflower Preserve, shivers with life - not just elegant grasses and sprightly wildflowers, but bees and indigo buntings and swallowtail butterflies that buzz and float along in summer's high heat. A recent walk through this busy place a few miles south of New Hope took two hours and could've taken way more, as in all day and night, 24/7. A meadow, no kidding, is an entire universe to explore. And the cicadas aren't background noise here, as they are in civilization.
NEWS
August 25, 2010 | By Larry King, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the state-owned Bowman's Hill Wildflower Preserve in Bucks County, the deed is not done. Indeed, it now appears that the deed to the 137-acre preserve - part of Washington Crossing Historic Park - may never change hands. Howls of protest over a state bill to transfer the property to a private, nonprofit group have seen to that. Instead, cash-strapped state officials say, a 99-year lease may be the more palatable outcome of the ongoing Battle of Bowman's Hill. A long-term lease would enable the Bowman's Hill Wildflower Preserve Association to continue to operate and improve, but not own, the site it has run for many years.
NEWS
December 18, 2009 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
With her blue-gray eyes, light reddish hair, and pale complexion that hints of pink, Mary Anne Borge is a true child of winter, her essential colors reflective of a December sky out in the woods. Which is where we are this chilly morning, outfitted with water bottles, binoculars, backpacks, and cameras, exploring the 134-acre Bowman's Hill Wildflower Preserve just south of New Hope. Borge is a volunteer naturalist here, one of a handful leading winter wildflower walks at preserves and arboretums in the region.
LIVING
July 10, 2009 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Evelyn Lovitz has waves of coneflower in her Cape May garden, mostly pink, purple and white, traditional colors for this popular North American wildflower. But two relative newcomers in the exploding coneflower market have her attention this season: 'Sunset,' which has salmon-orange petals and a henna-brown cone or center, and 'Twilight,' whose deep rosy petals encircle a button-center in rare burgundy. "Coneflowers are pretty, you can get them in all kinds of colors now, and if you want butterflies, they're like a magnet," Lovitz says.
LIVING
July 25, 2008 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Patricia and Conrad Cregan moved from Bustleton to Huntingdon Valley in 1984, the new house came with 1 1/3 acres and a John Deere lawn tractor. They were delighted: "We wanted more land," says Patricia. They got it, along with a heavy-duty lawn-care regimen shared by millions of Americans. But by 2004, the watering, weeding, fertilizing and mowing had gotten old. And Patricia, by then a volunteer at nearby Pennypack Ecological Restoration Trust, had learned about an alternative to the royal-family-style lawn.
NEWS
April 25, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Polly Drinker Elek, 80, of Bryn Mawr, a former editor and past president of the Episcopal Church Women of Pennsylvania, died April 18 of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Bryn Mawr Terrace. Mrs. Elek graduated from Springside School in Chestnut Hill. After earning a bachelor's degree from Radcliffe College, she volunteered with the American Friends Service Committee in rural Mexico for a year and then worked for the committee in Philadelphia for four years. In 1955, she joined the staff of the Academy of Natural Sciences Magazine and eventually became editor in chief.
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