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NEWS
August 27, 1992 | For The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
A look at the environment was the subject of a nature 'stomp' Saturday at Bristol Township's Silver Lake Nature Center. At left, the group wades through Black Ditch Creek. Above, Chris Tenaglia (left) and Mike Cherkowski examine their finds.
NEWS
July 8, 1995 | By Dennis T. Avery
Will we restabilize the world's human population but still crowd out our wildlife? That seems all too likely, since the world is currently encouraging family planning but discouraging high-yield farming. Ironically, the environmental movement has fostered both policies. The environmentalists have correctly helped to elevate our priority on wildlife. Last fall's Cairo population conference pledged another $17 billion for family planning worldwide - mainly to prevent a growing human population from crowding out wild creatures.
NEWS
November 12, 1989 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
More than 60 woodcarvers will be demonstrating their art and selling their work at the annual fall show of the South Jersey Wood Carvers, which will be held next Saturday and Sundayat the National Guard armory in Mount Holly. As it has for the last three years, the association will donate the proceeds from admission fees to Deborah Heart and Lung Center in Browns Mills. Because show organizers wanted to expand the show this year from one to two days, the show has been moved from Lenape High School in Medford to the armory on Route 38. Sixty-four carvers from New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland and Virginia will be selling carvings ranging from traditional duck decoys to elk, moose and other wild game.
NEWS
November 14, 2010 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
FAIRFIELD, Pa. - When Tom Stoner thinks about his friend David L. Grove, the state wildlife conservation officer fatally shot on patrol a few miles from here Thursday night, the stories come spilling out. He recounts how Grove, 31, once found two young boys illegally using bait to hunt deer in his territory 50 miles west of Harrisburg. He apprehended them and then tracked down their father. "The father was teaching the kids to break the law," Stoner said. "David recognized that.
NEWS
March 26, 1986 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lot more than history has accumulated at Fish House Cove since the days when Lenni Lenape Indians gathered wild rice, peas and blackberries there in the matted marsh grass on Pennsauken's Delaware River shore. Strong river currents have left their deposits: Wooden pilings and a weathered, but still inflated, basketball are visible in the cove's silty tidal flat. On the bank of Tippin's Pond, separated from the cove by a single ribbon of railroad track, are a heap of plasterboard chips, a rusted mattress spring and beer bottles.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1989 | By Patty Ladd, Los Angeles Daily News
America is squandering one of its most valuable natural resources with wanton disregard. Throughout the United States, thousands of endangered or threatened animals are killed illegally each year by hunters who cavalierly break the laws designed to protect our nation's wildlife population. Sunday at 7 p.m., the National Audubon Society and Superstation TBS examine this issue in "Greed, Guns and Wildlife," narrated by Richard Chamberlain. It is a one-hour look at the shocking reality of poaching in this country.
NEWS
July 15, 1987 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
A casual visitor to Jeanne Cramer's office at the Animal Welfare Association's Voorhees headquarters likely would find her poring over a ledger sheet, toting up the debits and credits that are a bookkeeper's stock in trade. But Cramer, who lives in Deptford, is much more than the association's bookkeeper. She also is director of its wildlife division - which, more often than not, casts her in the role of rescuer and substitute mother of homeless wild animals. What that means, said Cramer, "is that I'm called upon to rescue wild animals and to help train volunteers in the care and feeding of animals like raccoons, opossums, skunks or rabbits until we can release them into the wild.
NEWS
April 24, 1986 | By Theresa Conroy, Special to The Inquirer
The venture began in a storefront on Huntingdon Pike 16 years ago and has grown into a wildlife preserve of almost 400 acres. When the Pennypack Watershed Association was formed in 1970, David Witwer was its only full-time employee - an executive director with a part-time secretary. Now, the association has eight full-time workers and one part-time employee, a 22-member board of directors, 30 regular volunteers and about 120 other volunteers. The association, located at 2955 Edge Hill Rd. in Huntingdon Valley, will celebrate the 10th anniversary of the wildlife park dedication on Saturday afternoon.
NEWS
January 22, 1986 | By Robert Seltzer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The cleanup of Haddon Lake, a project started last month by the Camden County Park Commission, has yielded bottles, toys, car tires, shopping carts and a muskrat lodge. It is the lodge that Dave Orleans, a naturalist with the commission, finds so appealing. He said the discovery was significant because, as the cleanup project continued and the water became cleaner, the lake would be able to attract "more and more" wildlife. "I think this is one of those cases where what is good for the animals is good for the people," Orleans said.
NEWS
September 5, 1991 | By Linda Seida, Special to The Inquirer
Mention lawn ornaments, and some noses get turned up and brows get furrowed: "I hate those pink flamingos. " Although a drive through just about every Bucks County community could probably turn up at least a small flock of the often disdained birds, lawn ornaments this year, in general, seem to have moved away from the bright and gaudy. In their place, many homeowners have erected ornaments that reflect the county's own abundant wildlife, according to experts at local garden centers.
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NEWS
November 24, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he created a natural habitat on the acre surrounding his Cape May County home, Mike Crewe didn't know he'd be summoned to court to answer for it. His Lower Township property had become a kind of oasis amid the area's manicured lawns, a colorful meadow for monarch butterflies, native bees, and other species of wildlife. Its native grasses, seed- and berry-laden plants, and nectar-bearing flowers such as milkweed provided a feast and a rest stop. So Crewe, program director of the New Jersey Audubon Society's Cape May Bird Observatory, was disappointed by the reaction of neighbors who complained about his unmowed grounds to the municipality, which cited him for code violations last winter.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Casey Fabris, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the beginning of a work week that promised hot, steamy days, five high school students put on bug repellent, yellow hard hats, gardening gloves, and work boots before Monday's shift at the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum. For the next several hours, they pushed wheelbarrows full of water, shoveled soil, and tended to the native plants they added last week to the area in front of the visitor center. The crew members are in the middle of a six-week summer job that calls for them to work on projects varying from removing invasive plants to replacing park benches - thus the hard hats.
NEWS
January 20, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mike Gambardello, a construction worker from Pennsauken, has been hunting for 17 of his 25 years. He recalls clearly and with pride taking down his first deer, a four-point buck, in the Pine Barrens at age 15. His father was there to see it. "It's the biggest high you can ever get in your life," he said. But in the last several years, Gambardello has become increasingly aware of other hunters in the woods: Coyotes. "Eight years ago, it was very, very rare," he said. "Now walk down the road, and you see more coyote tracks than deer tracks.
NEWS
January 17, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
As far as historian Etienne Benson can determine, the nation's great squirrel experiment began in 1847 in Philadelphia, when three of the plucky little rodents - a wildlife novelty at the time - were released into Franklin Square. At the time, trees - nut trees especially - were scarce, so keeping them here took some effort. Officials actually provided nest boxes and food. Urban reformers thought the tiny beasts were beautifying the city and elevating the moral character of the citizenry.
NEWS
November 30, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Hurricane Sandy barreled into New Jersey a year ago, it left a 22-mile trail of debris across the tidal marshes and woodlands of the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge along the Jersey Shore. Roofs, docks, boats, household chemicals, and trash were carried by an eight-foot surge into parts of the 47,000-acre wildlife habitat, stretching through Atlantic, Ocean, and Burlington Counties. Wildlife Drive, an eight-mile stretch of road through the refuge, was heavily damaged and shut down.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
A powerful Pennsylvania legislator has asked for an investigation of an official who oversees natural gas development on state game lands at the same time that he moonlights as a consultant to private landowners on Marcellus Shale issues. State Rep. Daryl D. Metcalfe (R., Butler), the chairman of the House Committee on State Government, said he has asked the State Ethics Commission to investigate conflict-of-interest allegations against the wildlife agency official, William A. Capouillez.
NEWS
August 22, 2013 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
CONGRATULATIONS, Joseph Cionzynski, you've won a free trip back to sunny Florida. This time, however, there won't be any trips to Disney World, or the beach, or anywhere that's any fun at all. According to the Orange County, Fla., Sheriff's Office, Cionzynski, 59, of Lansdale, Montgomery County, is accused of taking photos of an 8-year-old boy inside a bathroom in Disney's Animal Kingdom earlier this month. Cionzynski, who told authorities in Florida that he was a "Scout leader" employed at the National Labor Relations Board, was arrested Aug. 14 in Montgomery County on charges of video voyeurism.
NEWS
May 1, 2013 | By Jon Hurdle, NJ SPOTLIGHT
Hunters love to shoot them and birders love to watch them, but both groups understand that they can save the bobwhite quail only by working together. The groups came together for a three-day conference to talk about preserving the scarce and secretive game bird and identify other areas of common interest, ranging from fighting invasive species and maintaining healthy forests to managing New Jersey's growing population of black bears. The Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey and the New Jersey State Federation of Sportsmen's Clubs held their first joint conference from Friday through Sunday with a view to identifying common interests and fostering cooperation.
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