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Wildlife Biologist

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NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kay Schuh has a dead vulture hanging in her backyard and is grateful for it. Until the bird was strung up last month by a federal wildlife biologist, Schuh's Mount Holly neighborhood had been taken over by what some see as vandals of the sky. For about nine winters, the pine trees in her backyard have hosted an increasing number of roosting vultures. "The smell is horrible," Schuh said. "You can see [droppings] all over our bushes and our shed in the back. " Schuh, mother of three, said her family routinely has had to clean dog Jake's feet before letting him in after a trip to the yard.
NEWS
January 16, 2009 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What does Philadelphia International Airport do to fend off pesky birds that might fly into jet engines? Turns out, plenty. Commercial airports have "wildlife hazard management" plans approved by the Federal Aviation Administration. At the Philadelphia airport, staff actively monitors the airfield 24 hours a day for birds and wildlife, deputy aviation director Mark E. Gale said. "Some things we do are preventive: We reduce brush, grasses and vegetation that attracts primarily birds, but all animals," said Gale, who oversees airport operations and facilities.
NEWS
March 28, 1995 | By Jennifer Wing, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The cameras are so sensitive they can tell the body-heat difference between a dog and a deer, but they could not penetrate the underbrush of Lower Merion to find out how many deer live in the township. For the second time in a year, Florida-based AirScan ran into trouble while trying to count the deer. "It didn't go well. They did it at 5 a.m. this morning, and the results weren't what they expected," Lower Merion Sgt. William Boegly said yesterday. "The numbers didn't jibe with what was estimated.
NEWS
March 30, 1999 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The Fairmount Park deer are back in the cross hairs. A judge yesterday lifted his restraining order against the deer shoot along the Wissahickon, clearing the way for a sharpshooter hired to "cull" the deer herd to head back to Philadelphia. Fairmount Park Commission chief of staff Barry Bessler said decisions on the shoot will be made on a nightly basis. There was no shooting done last night. "I don't intend to give up. I intend to oppose the hunt," said Glynnis Gradwell, one of the plaintiffs who asked Commonwealth Court Judge Charles Mirarchi Jr. to block the shoot.
NEWS
December 11, 2002 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Andrew Burnett, a state wildlife biologist, opened the mouth of the dead deer with a P-shaped tool called a jaw spreader and peered inside. The well-worn teeth told him what he needed to know. "It's a nice, old deer," Burnett said. "Three and a half years old. " It was Monday, and Burnett and Jodi Powers, another state Division of Fish and Wildlife biologist, were on duty at one of the busiest deer-check stations in the state on the biggest deer-hunting day of the year - opening day of the six-day firearm season.
LIVING
January 30, 1995 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A cougar in Cobb Creek Park? A bobcat in Chester County? One might think a spaceship from Pluto would be about as likely. But there they were. A number of residents and at least one police officer in Delaware County have sworn they saw the so-far elusive cougar - which is another name for a mountain lion or puma. The bobcat was dead, so its identity could be confirmed. Not only that, but a wildlife biologist who examined the animal concluded it was wild, not an escaped illegal pet, as the cougar is suspected to be. Other than the fact that the bobcat was found along Route 202 in the suburbs near Valley Forge National Historical Park, a rather unlikely habitat, the presence of the bobcat was not as surprising as that of a cougar.
NEWS
June 1, 1997 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Far across the pond, a tiny spot rose out of the treetops and silhouetted itself against the afternoon western sky. A tiny spot, half a mile away, so far that it must be huge. Sitting in his truck on a narrow road between two ponds, Paul Daly was asked whether anything else as big as an eagle lived in those trees. "Nothing," Daly said. Likely, he said, it was a bald eagle, one of two adults nesting at the 15,978-acre Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge. "You could walk in from the other side," through thick woodland, to try to spot the nest, said Daly, the refuge manager.
LIVING
July 7, 1994 | By Douglas A. Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As e.e. cummings, whose poetry at times involved barnyard animals, might have written, the way to catch an owl is not to do it bodily harm but lie all night as mosquitoes bite in darkened, dusty barn. Now, e.e. cummings probably didn't catch owls. The fellows known in these parts as the "owl boys" do. Bruce Colvin, 39, and Paul Hegdal, 58, are those fellows. They study barn owls. Colvin arrived from Boston in mid-May and stayed two weeks. Then he left, and Hegdal arrived from San Antonio, Texas.
NEWS
December 21, 1998 | By Douglas A. Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A thick glove covers the long, slender fingers of Martha Wible's left hand as - at 3:45 p.m. on a Monday - she stands on a platform 15 feet up in a gum tree. But her right hand - the one wearing the sapphire-and-diamond "sweet 16" ring - is necessarily exposed to the late-afternoon chill. It is her right thumb that slowly hooks over the hammer of her muzzleloader rifle and pulls back. Click. Her eyes probe the nearly silent woods. Her face is a picture of frozen concentration, framed by a stocking cap tugged so far down against the dropping temperature that not one strand of her auburn hair escapes.
NEWS
September 23, 1992 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It was November when Patrick Fasano thought he had spied a squirrel's nest high in an oak tree along the upper fringes of the Octoraro Reservoir in southwestern Chester County. But he quickly realized that this nest was way, way too big for squirrels. It was, he discovered, a nest for eagles. And when a young female bald eagle and her mate started spending lots of time there, Fasano and a few select others suspected that wildlife history was in the making. For the first time, this swath of Southeastern Pennsylvania became home to a bald eagle chick.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 17, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
As far as historian Etienne Benson can determine, the nation's great squirrel experiment began in 1847 in Philadelphia, when three of the plucky little rodents - a wildlife novelty at the time - were released into Franklin Square. At the time, trees - nut trees especially - were scarce, so keeping them here took some effort. Officials actually provided nest boxes and food. Urban reformers thought the tiny beasts were beautifying the city and elevating the moral character of the citizenry.
NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kay Schuh has a dead vulture hanging in her backyard and is grateful for it. Until the bird was strung up last month by a federal wildlife biologist, Schuh's Mount Holly neighborhood had been taken over by what some see as vandals of the sky. For about nine winters, the pine trees in her backyard have hosted an increasing number of roosting vultures. "The smell is horrible," Schuh said. "You can see [droppings] all over our bushes and our shed in the back. " Schuh, mother of three, said her family routinely has had to clean dog Jake's feet before letting him in after a trip to the yard.
NEWS
January 16, 2009 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What does Philadelphia International Airport do to fend off pesky birds that might fly into jet engines? Turns out, plenty. Commercial airports have "wildlife hazard management" plans approved by the Federal Aviation Administration. At the Philadelphia airport, staff actively monitors the airfield 24 hours a day for birds and wildlife, deputy aviation director Mark E. Gale said. "Some things we do are preventive: We reduce brush, grasses and vegetation that attracts primarily birds, but all animals," said Gale, who oversees airport operations and facilities.
NEWS
June 11, 2007 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For 22 years, New Jersey biologist Larry Niles has attempted to plumb the secrets of a quarter-pound shorebird that has one of the longest migrations on the planet. He's wondering how much longer he has. This spring on Delaware Bay, the red knot, named for its russet breeding plumage, hit a new low in its slide toward extinction. Its numbers on the bay, where most of the population stops for about two weeks in late May, reached 12,375 - about a thousand fewer than last year and the lowest since Niles began counting.
NEWS
July 10, 2006 | By Toni Callas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From a distance the dark blur on the forest floor looks like a trick of shadows and light. But as quick feet move closer, the blur takes shape. It's a black bear wrestling with a slender tree holding it captive in a snare. The bear thrashes, climbing and clawing at its captor while popping its jaw in a show of distress and aggression. "It's a young bear," veteran wildlife biologist Patrick Carr says, standing a few yards away. This male bruin - lanky by bear standards - is no taller than most sixth graders, yet quite formidable.
NEWS
December 11, 2002 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Andrew Burnett, a state wildlife biologist, opened the mouth of the dead deer with a P-shaped tool called a jaw spreader and peered inside. The well-worn teeth told him what he needed to know. "It's a nice, old deer," Burnett said. "Three and a half years old. " It was Monday, and Burnett and Jodi Powers, another state Division of Fish and Wildlife biologist, were on duty at one of the busiest deer-check stations in the state on the biggest deer-hunting day of the year - opening day of the six-day firearm season.
NEWS
March 30, 1999 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The Fairmount Park deer are back in the cross hairs. A judge yesterday lifted his restraining order against the deer shoot along the Wissahickon, clearing the way for a sharpshooter hired to "cull" the deer herd to head back to Philadelphia. Fairmount Park Commission chief of staff Barry Bessler said decisions on the shoot will be made on a nightly basis. There was no shooting done last night. "I don't intend to give up. I intend to oppose the hunt," said Glynnis Gradwell, one of the plaintiffs who asked Commonwealth Court Judge Charles Mirarchi Jr. to block the shoot.
NEWS
March 20, 1999 | By Larry Fish, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Common Pleas Court judge yesterday refused to stop the shooting of deer in the Wissahickon section of Fairmount Park, which the park's director said would likely take place next week. A group called Friends of Fairmount Park Animals had sought to block the use of a sharpshooter to thin the burgeoning herd, primarily because of safety concerns. Many specific details of how the culling is to be carried out - such as one rifle shot to the deer's brain - emerged for the first time in the courtroom of Judge Mary D. Colins.
NEWS
March 12, 1999 | By Larry Fish, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bridget Irons and some others opposed to shooting deer in the Wissahickon Valley said they don't plan on getting a lot of sleep for the next several days. "We're going to be out there if we have to stay up all night," said Irons, a Chestnut Hill resident. She plans to spend her nights driving around the 1,800-acre Wissahickon section of Fairmount Park "just being vigilant" for the presence of sharpshooters being brought in to reduce the numbers of white-tailed deer in the forested valley.
NEWS
December 21, 1998 | By Douglas A. Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A thick glove covers the long, slender fingers of Martha Wible's left hand as - at 3:45 p.m. on a Monday - she stands on a platform 15 feet up in a gum tree. But her right hand - the one wearing the sapphire-and-diamond "sweet 16" ring - is necessarily exposed to the late-afternoon chill. It is her right thumb that slowly hooks over the hammer of her muzzleloader rifle and pulls back. Click. Her eyes probe the nearly silent woods. Her face is a picture of frozen concentration, framed by a stocking cap tugged so far down against the dropping temperature that not one strand of her auburn hair escapes.
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