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Willard

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NEWS
July 27, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Myer Jacobs, 93, president and chief executive officer of Willard Inc., a former mechanical and electrical contracting firm, died Monday, July 23, of metastatic cancer at Cathedral Village, the retirement community in Andorra. Mr. Jacobs was a devoted bicycle rider and tennis player, his grandson Andrew Karasik said. "He was biking up until he turned 93 in September," Karasik said, "and he played tennis probably until April. " During his years at the firm, Willard worked on buildings at Albert Einstein Medical Center, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Penn Center, and others.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1993 | By Larry Fish, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You're in the new Convention Center and you need to, uh, powder your nose. Take a moment then to think about Willard G. Rouse 3d. The restrooms are, if not his greatest monument, an example of the impact the developer of Liberty Place and other mixed-use complexes has had on the sprawling Convention Center. Where original plans called for frankly utilitarian facilities, conventiongoers will get instead far posher-looking, bright-colored ceramic tile and faux marble. As chairman of the Pennsylvania Convention Center Authority since 1987 and a member of its important Design and Construction Committee, Rouse has had a strong influence on the way the building looks and operates, and thus how the public will react to it. He has been adamant that the building's interior look as rich and luxurious as possible, within its budget.
NEWS
June 22, 1996 | By Ralph Vigoda, Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. and Suzanne Gordon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS Inquirer staff writers Robert Zausner and Melissa Milewski and correspondents Russell Gold, Dan Hardy and Justin Pritchard contributed to this report
While Aimee Willard's parents completed her funeral arrangements and asked for "the gift of privacy" yesterday, police officials expressed confidence that they would find who killed the star athlete. A key is learning why Willard stopped her car on a ramp off the Blue Route early Thursday morning. "That," said State Police Capt. Thomas LaCrosse, "is the $64,000 question. " Willard, 22, a standout lacrosse and soccer player, was killed sometime after 1:40 a.m. Thursday, when she left a bar in Wayne.
NEWS
September 23, 1998 | By Rich Henson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Did Aimee Willard's killer drive by the scene from which she had been abducted hours earlier on a Blue Route exit ramp - a place crawling with police still trying to understand her confounding disappearance - and toss her panties and sneakers from the passing vehicle? That was the question prosecutors left dangling yesterday as the trial in Willard's slaying moved into its second day and Delaware County Assistant District Attorney Daniel McDevitt called 11 witnesses, many of whom testified to the grisly condition of Willard's body when it was discovered.
NEWS
December 14, 1996 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
Since Aimee Willard's June murder, her mother has helped establish a college endowment fund in her honor. And Gail Willard, along with others, planted a tree near the Blue Route exit ramp where police found the family car Aimee drove that night. The Brookhaven resident also was instrumental in establishing an $8,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of her daughter's killer. Now, Willard is ready to take yet another step. "I decided that this was the time to give back rather than dwell on Aimee's spirit," Willard said yesterday at a news conference at Our Lady of Hope Church, at 19th and Tioga streets, near the lot on Indiana Avenue near 16th Street where Aimee's body was found.
LIVING
October 15, 1999 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
Willard says a lawyer would be a job he could do - and then he could help people when he's older. In the meantime, he helps by cutting the grass and raking leaves. He also picks up apples off the ground from the tree by the house and puts dishes in the dishwasher after rinsing them. Though there is neglect and abuse in his background, Willard is friendly, lovable and outgoing. "Whoever adopts Willard is going to be thoroughly happy with him," his social worker says. He told his social worker he wanted a home he could always call his own. "And a mom and dad of my own," he added.
LIVING
November 14, 1997 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
"I want to be a person who takes care of babies - three or four, at least," says Nykia, 9. A shy smile appears as she adds, "And I like puppy dogs, too. " Her brother, Willard, 10, stops shooting a foam ball into a basket as Nykia describes her hopes. "I want a family that can afford us, who will celebrate birthdays and have cake and ice cream. And I want to stay with Willard. He's fun and I love him. " "A nice family," Willard adds, "that can shelter us, take care of us, and won't hit us that much.
NEWS
March 23, 1986 | By Marcia Stepanek, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Calling the nation's swelling insurance crisis "a threat to the American economy," the Justice Department has issued a report urging dramatic reforms in the legal system, including sharp cuts in attorneys' fees and in the number of lawsuits filed against cities and corporations. The 80-page report, compiled by a group headed by Assistant Attorney General Richard K. Willard, cites a 758 percent increase in the number of product-liability lawsuits in federal district courts between 1974 and 1985.
NEWS
September 1, 2000 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
An eight-month-old infant living at a foster-care home in the West End was shot in the forehead yesterday morning by an 11-year-old foster child who also lived in the house, police said. Ranier Holmes remained in critical condition last night at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Police said they suspected the shooting was accidental. They said they believed that the .38-caliber revolver that was fired belonged to Jane Bryant, the foster mother in the house on the 400 block of Highland Avenue.
NEWS
October 4, 1991 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Around every curve and corner in "Paradise," a poignant moment lurks like an assailant. It begins with a tiny, doe-eyed boy named Willard being chased home by neighborhood bullies. When he gets there, things don't improve. He's shipped off by his jilted, pregnant mom on a Greyhound bus to spend a summer in the country while she bravely gives birth alone. Pretty poignant, but we're just getting started here. The couple that he's staying with (played by Don Johnson and Melanie Griffith)
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NEWS
November 26, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
ARTHUR BOMAR - convicted in 1998 of kidnapping, brutalizing and fatally beating star college athlete Aimee Willard and then dumping her naked body in a weed-strewn North Philadelphia lot - should face death for the horrific slaying, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court has ruled for the second time. The ruling Friday denying a Post Conviction Relief Act petition by Bomar affirmed a September 2012 ruling by Delaware County Common Pleas Judge Frank T. Hazel. Hazel had found numerous claims by Bomar to be meritless, including that he was not competent to stand trial and that his defense counsel was ineffective, according to a statement released yesterday by the Delaware County District Attorney.
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Willard S. Boothby Jr., 92, of Bryn Mawr and Jupiter, Fla., a respected leader in Philadelphia's business and philanthropic communities, died Saturday, March 22, of complications after a fall, at his Florida home. A Philadelphia native, Mr. Boothby was managing director of Paine Webber & Co., a stock brokerage and asset management firm, before retiring in the early 1990s. But he found time to take a leadership role in many local institutions, including as president of the Academy of Music and as a director of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 13, 2013 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
I WAS DIGGING MY WAY through an overgrown vacant lot full of scurrying somethings that I chose to think were bunnies when Joetta Johnson's voice pierced through the thick brush. "Say something so I know you didn't get lost in there," she called out. Moments earlier, Johnson was giving me a walking tour of some of the empty lots in her North Philly neighborhood when she offhandedly mentioned that the one in the roughest shape, at 16th and Indiana, was once a park dedicated to murder victim Aimee Willard.
NEWS
September 29, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Werner K. Kirmse, 90, of Spring House, an engineer who designed the mechanical systems for One Liberty Place, died Monday, Sept. 24, at Kindred Hospital of complications from an aneurysm. For more than 40 years, Mr. Kirmse was with Willard Inc., a mechanical contractor, designing heating and air-conditioning systems for major construction projects, including a Marriott Hotel and One Liberty Place. The 61-story Liberty Place, which was completed in 1987, changed the skyline of Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 5, 2012 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Delaware County Court judge denied the latest death-penalty appeal from Arthur J. Bomar, who was convicted of killing college athlete Aimee Willard in 1996, the district attorney announced Tuesday. Judge Frank T. Hazel issued a 213-page opinion addressing 22 claims by Bomar in his appeal, making any future appeals on the same grounds more difficult. The case has already been appealed to the state Supreme Court. District Attorney Jack Whelan on Tuesday called Bomar "every parent's worst nightmare.
NEWS
July 27, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Myer Jacobs, 93, president and chief executive officer of Willard Inc., a former mechanical and electrical contracting firm, died Monday, July 23, of metastatic cancer at Cathedral Village, the retirement community in Andorra. Mr. Jacobs was a devoted bicycle rider and tennis player, his grandson Andrew Karasik said. "He was biking up until he turned 93 in September," Karasik said, "and he played tennis probably until April. " During his years at the firm, Willard worked on buildings at Albert Einstein Medical Center, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Penn Center, and others.
NEWS
September 8, 2010 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Storyee Robinson couldn't believe what she saw when she stepped inside the new, $30.3 million Willard Elementary School in Kensington Tuesday morning. There was a gymnasium. An instructional music room. A science lab. An auditorium. Classrooms with electronic whiteboards. And an inviting cafeteria with soaring, clerestory windows. It had taken more than a decade to replace the outmoded and overcrowded 1907 Willard School where children had to eat lunch at their desks and were tutored in hallways.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2010
NEXT TIME I'm trying to decide if a show is worth keeping up with, I may ask myself: What Would Fred Do? That would be Fred Willard, who last week popped up for the second time on ABC's "Modern Family" as Frank Dunphy, RV enthusiast, dog-lover and father to the often clueless Phil (Ty Burrell). A couple of weeks earlier, he was on ABC's "Castle," playing sidekick to a late-show host (yes, just as he did to Martin Mull so long ago on "Fernwood 2-Night"). Tonight, Willard's on NBC's "Chuck" (8 p.m., Channel 10)
NEWS
August 24, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
G. Willard Webster, 95, a bacteriologist who helped produce lifesaving vaccines, died Aug. 13 at Foulkeways, a Quaker retirement community in Gwynedd. While studying physics at the University of Pennsylvania, Mr. Webster washed glassware in a laboratory at Sharpe & Dohme, now Merck & Co. He eventually became a medical researcher in the pharmaceutical company's laboratory and launched a career. During World War II, he received a deferment from military service to work with scientists, including Jonas Salk, who were preparing and testing an influenza vaccine.
NEWS
December 23, 2008 | By Art Carey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Lawrence is convinced that genes tell, that talents and interests are passed down through families as certainly as body types and hair color. His Scottish grandfather made patterns for machine castings. His great-uncle crafted violins. His father was a Chester shipyard machinist who could make and fix anything, including clocks and watches. Lawrence inherited a gift for fine manual work, which he exercised in his 32-year career as a dentist. Now semi-retired, he is applying those skills to his passion - making adaptations of some of the most beautiful clock designs ever produced.
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