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William Bradfield

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NEWS
October 29, 1987 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Television Critic
Joseph Wambaugh hasn't always been satisfied with what's been done with his books when they're adapted for film. He can still, for instance, barely conceal his rage over what Hollywood did to "The Choirboys," his third novel, in a notorious 1977 film adaptation that Wambaugh has long since disavowed. Since then, the former Los Angeles Police Department sergeant has assumed more control over his properties in transition. For example, he himself wrote the film adaptation from his 10th book, "Echoes in the Darkness," a super- selling account of the 1979 Reinert murders.
NEWS
December 20, 1986 | By Phyllis Holtzman and Mary Jane Fine, Special to The Inquirer
Proctor Nowell, a key prosecution witness against William Bradfield in the Susan Reinert murder case, has been convicted in Delaware County Court of first-degree murder in the stabbing death of his girlfriend. Nowell's attorney, Ed Harris, had contended that Nowell, 27, was mentally ill and therefore not responsible for his actions. Nowell admitted killing Monica Hines, 23, in July but said that he committed the crime while under a witchcraft spell and had heard voices telling him to do it. The 12-member jury deliberated for about 3 1/2 hours before returning the verdict at 8:05 p.m. Thursday.
NEWS
September 2, 1987 | By KURT HEINE, Daily News Staff Writer
Triple murderer William Bradfield, who swindled $25,000 from schoolteacher Susan Reinert before he murdered her and her two children, can't weasel out of paying back the money to her estate, the state Superior Court has ruled. Bradfield, the enigmatic former Upper Merion High School teacher who masterminded the sensational 1979 murders with the Montgomery County school's former principal, Jay C. Smith, had claimed he shouldn't have to pay back the money just because a Delaware County Court jury convicted him of extorting it from Reinert.
NEWS
May 14, 2009 | By Derrick Nunnally INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jay C. Smith, 80, the former Upper Merion High School principal convicted of a teacher's shocking 1979 murder, then freed from death row by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court in 1992, died Tuesday. "It is the end of an era of sorts in the criminal-justice system," said William C. Costopolous, Smith's longtime attorney. "He brought a lot of controversy to the legal community, but he always maintained his innocence. " Smith died at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital, which he had checked into Monday for treatment of a heart condition, his wife, Maureen, said yesterday.
NEWS
March 25, 1986 | By BOB GROTEVANT, Daily News Staff Writer
A Dauphin County judge ruled yesterday that former Upper Merion High School principal Jay Smith can have a court-appointed lawyer at his side when his murder trial begins next week. Senior Judge William Lipsitt, who will preside at Smith's trial in the 1979 murders of former Upper Merion teacher Susan Reinert and her two children, dismissed a claim by the state attorney general's office that Smith was not indigent. Deputy Attorney General Richard L. Guida contended that Smith, 57, could afford to hire private counsel because he receives $653 a month from the Pennsylvania Public School Employees Retirement System.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1987 | By ROSE DeWOLF, Daily News Staff Writer
Murder, they wrote . . . There was never any doubt that someday, someone would write a book about the Susan Reinert murder case. The story is so tragic . . . and so bizarre. And, as it happens, two books about it have just been published: "Engaged to Murder" by local writer Loretta Schwartz-Noble (Viking, $17.95) and "Echoes in the Darkness" by best-selling author Joseph Wambaugh (Morrow, $18.95). Susan Reinert was a quiet, bespectacled teacher at Upper Merion High School, a divorced mother of two nice kids, Karen, 11, and Michael, 10. In June, 1979, her nude, bruised, body was found in the trunk of her car, in a parking lot just outside Harrisburg.
NEWS
November 17, 2008 | By Derrick Nunnally INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some real-life figures walk straight into the history books. Sixteen years after he was freed from death row, Jay C. Smith has tried to write his way out of a true-crime best-seller. Smith, 80, is the former Upper Merion High School principal whose Jekyll-and-Hyde downfall became the stuff of suburban legend. A lifelong educator and Army Reserve colonel, he was caught in 1978 with drugs, illegal guns and pornography. He was convicted in a string of Sears robberies, and then found guilty of killing Upper Merion teacher Susan Reinert and her children.
NEWS
December 10, 1998 | By Matt Stearns, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Convicted murderer William Bradfield may have died in January, but he continues to haunt his old colleague and alleged coconspirator, former Upper Merion High School principal Jay C. Smith. Items removed from Bradfield's prison cell appear to be the driving force behind the renewed investigation of the 1978 disappearances of Stephanie and Edward Hunsberger, Smith's daughter and son-in-law, Montgomery County First Assistant District Attorney Bruce L. Castor Jr. said yesterday. "Near as I can tell, they uncovered some evidence in Bradfield's cell they think might be of value," Castor said.
NEWS
September 8, 1987 | By KURT HEINE, Daily News Staff Writer
Former high school principal Jay C. Smith today was sentenced to three separate death sentences for the 1979 murders of schoolteacher Susan Reinert and her two children. In a rambling, 45-minute speech before the sentencing, Smith denied he committed the murders and said they were committed by William Bradfield, a schoolteacher who also has been convicted of the killings. "There is no Reinert blood on my hands," Smith told Dauphin County Senior Judge William W. Lipsett in a small, crowded courtroom in downtown Harrisburg.
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NEWS
December 7, 2012 | By Bill Reed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Retired Bucks County Court Judge Isaac S. Garb, 83, of Buckingham, who presided over the controversial Point Pleasant pumping station case that garnered national attention and the trial of William Bradfield of the "Main Line Murders" case, died Monday, Dec. 4. Judge Garb, known as Zeke, was still handling settlement conferences, bail hearings, and bench warrants as a master until 21/2 weeks before he died. He had retired as a full-time judge at the state-mandated age of 70. "He had a great legal mind," County Court Administrator Doug Praul said Wednesday.
NEWS
May 14, 2009 | By Derrick Nunnally INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jay C. Smith, 80, the former Upper Merion High School principal convicted of a teacher's shocking 1979 murder, then freed from death row by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court in 1992, died Tuesday. "It is the end of an era of sorts in the criminal-justice system," said William C. Costopolous, Smith's longtime attorney. "He brought a lot of controversy to the legal community, but he always maintained his innocence. " Smith died at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital, which he had checked into Monday for treatment of a heart condition, his wife, Maureen, said yesterday.
NEWS
November 17, 2008 | By Derrick Nunnally INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some real-life figures walk straight into the history books. Sixteen years after he was freed from death row, Jay C. Smith has tried to write his way out of a true-crime best-seller. Smith, 80, is the former Upper Merion High School principal whose Jekyll-and-Hyde downfall became the stuff of suburban legend. A lifelong educator and Army Reserve colonel, he was caught in 1978 with drugs, illegal guns and pornography. He was convicted in a string of Sears robberies, and then found guilty of killing Upper Merion teacher Susan Reinert and her children.
NEWS
December 10, 1998 | By Matt Stearns, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Convicted murderer William Bradfield may have died in January, but he continues to haunt his old colleague and alleged coconspirator, former Upper Merion High School principal Jay C. Smith. Items removed from Bradfield's prison cell appear to be the driving force behind the renewed investigation of the 1978 disappearances of Stephanie and Edward Hunsberger, Smith's daughter and son-in-law, Montgomery County First Assistant District Attorney Bruce L. Castor Jr. said yesterday. "Near as I can tell, they uncovered some evidence in Bradfield's cell they think might be of value," Castor said.
NEWS
January 18, 1998 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Anne Barnard and Lacy McCrary, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Some say William Bradfield is taking the answer to his grave. Others say he never knew it. The answer, that is, to one of the lingering questions around Bradfield's murder conviction: Where are the bodies of Susan Reinert's two children? Bradfield, 64, a former Upper Merion High School English teacher who tutored fellow inmates and attended weekly Mass, died a quiet death in his cell at Graterford Prison on Friday afternoon from an apparent heart attack, Montgomery County Coroner Halbert D. Fillinger said yesterday.
NEWS
August 21, 1996 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After years of legal wrangling, the family of slain Upper Merion schoolteacher Susan Reinert has secured the $25,000 that her killer, William S. Bradfield, swindled from her shortly before her 1979 death. Under the out-of-court settlement, drafted by an attorney for the Reinert family, the money plus $2,500 in court costs will be transferred to Reinert's estate. It will come from a cash-reserve account belonging to a former girlfriend of Bradfield's, Joanne Aitken, whom Reinert's family was also suing.
NEWS
May 20, 1996 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The case has gone from national headlines to best-selling novel to made-for-TV movie and, most recently, to the back shelves of bookstores. But however much the 1979 murders of Susan Reinert and her two children have passed into memory for most, the family of the victims still must deal with unfinished business that brings back the pain. At issue is $25,000 that officials say William S. Bradfield, who is serving life terms for the three murders, bilked from Reinert before she and her children disappeared from their Ardmore home on a cool June evening.
NEWS
December 27, 1989 | By Joseph Grace, Daily News Staff Writer
Florence and John Reinert were preparing for Christmas Friday when a state prosecutor called and said Jay C. Smith, the man convicted of murdering their daughter-in-law and two grandchildren in 1979, was getting a new trial. With that untimely call of bleak tidings, the Reinerts began to confront the reality that their 10-year ordeal of uncertainty, grief and painful publicity, an ordeal they thought over, would begin anew. "It was very hard on us over the holiday," Florence Reinert said yesterday.
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | By Robert W. Fowler, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this article
The state Supreme Court yesterday ordered that former Upper Merion High School Principal Jay C. Smith receive a new trial for the 1979 murders of Susan Reinert and her two children. Smith, 60, was immediately moved from death row to a regular cell at the state prison in Huntingdon. He was sentenced to die in the state's electric chair after a jury convicted him in 1986. The court agreed with Smith's contention that Dauphin County Senior Judge William Lipsitt erred when he allowed a jury to consider hearsay testimony that implicated him in the murders of Reinert, 36, an Upper Merion English teacher, and her two children, Karen, 11, and Michael, 10. Smith was convicted after a month-long trial.
NEWS
November 28, 1988 | By John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News staff writer Maria Gallagher contributed to this report
The Dauphin County district attorney's office is looking into the possibility that a state trooper fabricated evidence in the Susan Reinert murder case, then planted it in an evidence drawer to protect another trooper from a perjury charge. Law enforcement sources have told the Daily News that one former and two current state troopers are under scrutiny in the investigation, begun several months ago by the state police internal affairs unit. Last week the state police brought their case to the Dauphin County DA's office for possible prosecution.
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