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William Brennan

NEWS
July 28, 2014 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Time for another installment of Law & Order: Philly Ethics Division . (Queue "doink doink" sound of a cell door slamming.) Last week, several recovering "judges" of Philadelphia's illustrious Traffic "Court," where ticket-fixing for the connected was not merely a given, but appears to have been a calling, were acquitted of the most serious charges. Well, except for the lying business. Like when former "Judge" Michael Lowry told the grand jury - please don't read this while drinking a beverage - that he "treated everybody in that courtroom the same.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A pilot who spent 16 years ferrying the Philadelphia owners of Elmer's Glue and a collection of drug, energy, and manufacturing firms around the country in Gulfstream jets faces federal fraud charges after allegedly using credit cards and phony firms to drain $2.7 million from his bosses' accounts since 2006. Berwind Group , the Center City investment firm owned by heirs of one of the nation's great coal-mining fortunes, acknowledged that it had terminated its chief pilot and director of aviation, Kevin N. Boardman , and reported him earlier this year to the U.S. Attorney's Office.
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
AFTER TWO days of deliberations, a federal jury acquitted six former Philadelphia Traffic Court judges of corruption and fraud yesterday, debunking the government's claims of judicial dishonesty and ticket-fixing. In count after count, U.S. District Judge Lawrence Stengel read "not guilty" from the verdict sheet to a packed courtroom. Sobs of relief echoed from the gallery from family and friends of former Traffic Court judges Michael Sullivan, Michael Lowry, Robert Mulgrew, Willie Singletary, Thomasine Tynes and Mark Bruno.
NEWS
May 29, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
When she retired in 2005 as a district justice in Perkasie in central Bucks County, Ruth C. Dietrich was not ready to hang up her black robe. So she applied to state court officials to substitute as needed in the state's minor judiciary. Dietrich's first assignment the next year was Philadelphia's Traffic Court and, as she told a federal jury Tuesday, it was quickly clear she was not in Perkasie anymore. Testifying at the ticket-fixing trial of six former Traffic Court judges and a Center City businessman, Dietrich, 79, told the jury how Traffic Court Judge Willie Singletary introduced her to the concept of "consideration.
NEWS
May 28, 1986
I believe some clarification is required regarding a May 6 Letter to the Editor about funding remedial programs at parochial schools. Considering that funding of such programs is lawfully intended for non- public as well as public students, the U.S. Supreme Court's questionable interpretation of the Constitution leaves no alternative other than the use of vans so that private school students may receive remedial instructions to which they...
NEWS
August 24, 2012
Prosecutors have refiled felony sex-assault charges against a suspended Philadelphia priest, days after a judge dropped them for lack of evidence. A city judge found that the alleged victim's testimony at a preliminary hearing last week failed to support the most serious charges against the Rev. Andrew McCormick, 56. The judge upheld misdemeanor charges, including indecent exposure and indecent assault. Prosecutors insist the priest's actions amounted to felony sexual assault.
NEWS
December 9, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Justice William J. Brennan Jr., the Supreme Court's oldest and most liberal member, was admitted to Bethesda Naval Hospital yesterday afternoon suffering from pneumonia, a court spokeswoman said. The announcement of Brennan's illness was made in a brief statement by the Supreme Court public information office. "Justice William Brennan was admitted to the Bethesda Naval Hospital with pneumonia," the statement said. "He is being treated with antibiotics and doctors expect him to respond very well.
NEWS
September 16, 2013 | By Craig R. McCoy, Mark Fazlollah, and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
Federal prosecutors and FBI agents have subpoenaed financial information from five Philadelphia judges, sought campaign-donation records, and interviewed judges and political figures as part of a wide-ranging investigation over the last year, The Inquirer has learned. Court officials and lawyers said they were unsure of the investigation's focus. Two people said the FBI questioned them about what they called possible "fixing cases. " A third said agents asked about "pay-to-play," the long-standing practice of campaign donors getting favors from public officials.
NEWS
February 2, 1990
REMOVE THE STAIN OF PREJUDICE In the last quarter-century, we in this country have taken the first steps toward a comprehensive definition of the constitutional idea of human dignity. We are, however, by no means finished. . . . Equality cannot exist where one person is free to stain another with the paints of prejudice and hate. These markings are not . . . indelible. They can be eliminated, and indeed must be under a constitution that promises all inhabitants equal protection of the laws.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
IN 2010, the FBI and Montgomery County authorities dug up a whopping $1.1 million stuffed in PVC pipes under the yard of Joseph "Joe Vito" Mastronardo Jr. and his wife, Joanna, daughter of the late Mayor Frank Rizzo, at their sprawling manor in the Meadowbrook section of Abington Township. Mastronardo, known as the "Gentleman Gambler," was accused of heading an illegal multimillion-dollar sports-betting business with his brother, John. His son, Joseph F. "Joey" Mastronardo, also took part in the bookmaking scheme, authorities said.
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