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William Penn

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NEWS
November 30, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Jeremy Nowak, president of the William Penn Foundation for only 18 months, has left his position, the foundation announced Wednesday, catching the region's nonprofit and educational communities by surprise. Foundation officials said in a statement that "differences in approach regarding implementation" of William Penn's new strategic plan - developed during the aggressive Nowak's tenure - led to the departure. There was no hint it was coming - even foundation staff members were caught off guard.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
'Who founded New York?" asks one of the experts toward the end of the seventh episode of the local history documentary series Philadelphia: The Great Experiment . "Who founded Boston or Chicago? The answer is . . . I don't know. Nobody cares. That's the point. " But everyone, from grade-schoolers to pensioners, from East Coast to West, knows who founded Philadelphia: William Penn. Airing at 7:30 p.m. Thursday on 6ABC (WPVI-TV), the seventh episode of The Great Experiment , titled "In Penn's Shadow (1680-1720)
NEWS
June 9, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
She was known variously as Alice, Alice of Dunk's Ferry, Black Alice, or Old Alice. She was a slave who lived at least 108 years - some say 116 - and saw three centuries. She never learned how to read or write, and never gained her freedom, but her head was filled with priceless memories. Alice could tell a story like no one else - whether it was about meeting William Penn, the founder of Pennsylvania; witnessing the early days of Philadelphia; or navigating boats between Dunk's Ferry - now Beverly - and what is now Bensalem.
SPORTS
September 14, 2002 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The caliber of football is strong in the Diamond State. Egg Harbor Township discovered that last night in a season-opening 20-7 loss to visiting William Penn of Delaware in a nonleague game played in Egg Harbor Township. Ranked No. 8 in South Jersey by The Inquirer, Egg Harbor Township never moved the ball consistently against a William Penn team that lost to eventual state champion Newark, 6-0, last year in the semifinals. Meanwhile, William Penn (1-0) showed that it is a serious contender to end Newark's reign as five-time Delaware Division I state champion.
NEWS
February 23, 2012 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
The William Penn Foundation is donating $1.5 million to help restructure the Philadelphia School District, and officials said Wednesday they thought the move could bring more funds from the philanthropic and nonprofit sectors. The money would go directly to pay for what is regarded as a much-needed management consultant, William Penn president Jeremy Nowak said Wednesday. Nowak also said the foundation would help the School Reform Commission identify other private funders to help turn the district around.
NEWS
December 1, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
It looks like a movie set from National Treasure , a dusty church-basement gym crammed with boxes, bureaus, mirrors, and paintings. There's no hidden map, but perhaps a future treasure: The plan is to turn the old gym, with its worn backboards and broken hoops, into a multiservice center to help the city's homeless, offering meals, showers, bathrooms, mental-health care, legal advice, and more at a Center City religious landmark. "We want to provide a place where all the different types of ministerial services we have available, our folks, and in the community and partner ministries, come together and provide services," said the Rev. Mike Harder, a pastor at Liberti Church.
NEWS
August 15, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
One recent sun-drenched day, Kate Goodrich stood amid one of the main reasons she took a job as assistant professor of biology at Widener University: that beautiful arboretum up the road, where professors have taken students for years to study the plants, trees, and water. In May, Widener acquired Taylor Memorial Arboretum, which means professors and students will have unfettered access, 24/7, to the 30-acre oasis in Nether Providence Township, just across the border from the city of Chester.
NEWS
November 30, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a clear day, the newly opened observation deck on the 57th floor of One Liberty Place offers unhindered views as far as Limerick's steaming nuclear plant cooling towers in the north to Wilmington in the south - with all of Philadelphia's urban bustle packed in between. What would our city's founders, stuck at pedestrian level, have made of such a panoramic, bird's-eye vista? "I am beside myself," offered the Benjamin Franklin impersonator hired to stand next to the observation deck's larger-than-life, geodesic bust of Franklin and greet the opening-day crowds Saturday.
NEWS
July 3, 1994 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MICHAEL BRYANT
Montae Roundtree came to Penn's Landing and found Penn snoring. Daniel Sigmund, portraying William Penn, was taking a nap during Delaware River Days, part of Welcome America! Festivities continue today at Penn's Landing and elsewhere.
NEWS
November 19, 2015 | Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Across the city, many classrooms lack what Alison Walters has cobbled together from 10-cent yard sales, book-club deals, and the proceeds of side jobs she works "to support my teaching habit": a colorful, voluminous classroom library. City and school officials want to change that. On Tuesday, Mayor-elect Jim Kenney, Superintendent William R. Hite Jr., and 30 other leaders gathered at Clara Barton School to launch a $3.5 million fund-raising campaign aimed at placing libraries in every Philadelphia School District elementary classroom.
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NEWS
August 15, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
One recent sun-drenched day, Kate Goodrich stood amid one of the main reasons she took a job as assistant professor of biology at Widener University: that beautiful arboretum up the road, where professors have taken students for years to study the plants, trees, and water. In May, Widener acquired Taylor Memorial Arboretum, which means professors and students will have unfettered access, 24/7, to the 30-acre oasis in Nether Providence Township, just across the border from the city of Chester.
NEWS
July 12, 2016 | By Roy Peterson
  Summer is here, and the warm weather has flooded historic Philadelphia with thousands of tourists - everyone from American schoolchildren to international guests. Some locals might scoff at this influx of curious visitors, but not me. Their presence reminds me that I live in a special city. The cobblestone streets that I walk every day were the cornerstones of our nation. And because faith was so important to our nation's founders, it is impossible to explore the City of Brotherly Love without noting the centrality of religious institutions.
NEWS
June 13, 2016
Philadelphia's 10,000-acre Fairmount Park system is one of the largest such municipal spaces in the world. Yet the park's origins do not belong to any botanical benevolence. Unlike Central Park - a deliberate attempt to preserve New York's dwindling green spaces amid urbanization - Fairmount began as a solution to a practical problem: providing Philadelphians with clean water. In his vision of a new type of city marked as much by greenery as geometry, William Penn planted the seeds of five public squares.
NEWS
May 12, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
William Penn is due for a physical. Not to mention a waxing and a buffing. The City of Philadelphia plans to restore Penn's bronze statue atop City Hall in late August. The work will take three to four weeks, during which time the observation deck will be closed. Penn's statue was last restored in 2007 with funds from the Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia and the city. This time, a different mix is involved: $125,000 in private funds, a $25,000 National Endowment of the Arts (NEA)
NEWS
February 11, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
As Gov. Wolf unveiled next year's proposed state budget while this year's spending plan remains in limbo, school administrators said Tuesday that they were no longer just frustrated - they're baffled and furious. The governor's new proposal is "almost futile," said William Penn School District Superintendent Joseph Bruni, whose district is part of a lawsuit challenging the state's school funding system. "It's discouraging," he said. "It's mind-boggling. I just think the whole process has become ridiculous, because this year's budget isn't passed, school districts are struggling more than ever, and they're talking about a budget for next year and nothing seems to have progressed.
SPORTS
February 8, 2016 | By Jack Goodwillie, Staff Writer
Pitman wrestler Tyler Baer dominated the Schalick Quad on Saturday, scoring falls in each of his three bouts to help the Panthers win all three of their matches. Baer (152 pounds) pinned his Westampton Tech opponent in 2 minutes, 35 seconds. His pin against Schalick came in just 52 seconds. The senior also wrestled Sterling at 160 pounds and scored his third fall of the day in 2:48. Pitman defeated Westampton Tech, 57-21; beat Sterling, 43-26; and conquered the hosts, 49-15. Boys' Basketball Aziz Parker scored 20 points and hit the go-ahead three-pointer in the second overtime to give Medford Tech a 68-67 victory over William Penn at Bishop Eustace.
SPORTS
January 31, 2016
Boys' Basketball CONEY CLASSIC Paulsboro 69, Eastern 57 Haddonfield 76, Cinnaminson 65 Cherry Hill East 67, Sterling 40 Washington Township 67, Pemberton 52 Glassboro 59, Moorestown 45 Rancocas Valley 67, Schalick 54 BURLINGTON COUNTY LEAGUE Florence 63, Burlington Township 45 CAPE-ATLANTIC LEAGUE Middle Township 52, Oakcrest 39 Mainland 72, Lower Cape May 52 OLYMPIC CONFERENCE Lenape 57, Camden Catholic...
NEWS
January 18, 2016
If virtuous art in government buildings guaranteed good governance, Pennsylvania's state Capitol would produce only first-rate politicians, heroically adorned as it is with the murals of the pioneering American artist Violet Oakley. Oakley (1874-1961) spent her childhood in Bergen Heights, N.J., and Philadelphia, filling voluminous sketchbooks. In an unfinished autobiography, Oakley revealed that if she did not have a pencil and paper, she sketched on the roof of her mouth with her tongue.
NEWS
December 1, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
It looks like a movie set from National Treasure , a dusty church-basement gym crammed with boxes, bureaus, mirrors, and paintings. There's no hidden map, but perhaps a future treasure: The plan is to turn the old gym, with its worn backboards and broken hoops, into a multiservice center to help the city's homeless, offering meals, showers, bathrooms, mental-health care, legal advice, and more at a Center City religious landmark. "We want to provide a place where all the different types of ministerial services we have available, our folks, and in the community and partner ministries, come together and provide services," said the Rev. Mike Harder, a pastor at Liberti Church.
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