CollectionsWilliam Smith
IN THE NEWS

William Smith

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer Staff writer Jim Nicholson contributed to this report
William Smith, 68, longtime associate conductor of the Philadelphia Orchestra, died late yesterday afternoon at Delaware County Memorial Hospital. Smith touched generations of listeners during his 41 years with the Orchestra. In his many imaginatively programmed children's concerts, sometimes illustrated by artists or dancers, he introduced the pieces with a friendly wit and accessible style that defined the magic of music for many thousands of young people. He also led the annual holiday performances of Handel's "Messiah" and the New Year's Eve Viennese program, as well as several subscription programs of his own choosing.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1993 | By Ken Keuffel Jr., FOR THE INQUIRER
Two important but vastly different men of music shared prominence Sunday in a concert by three women. The two men were William Smith, the late associate conductor of the Philadelphia Orchestra, and Peter Schickele, the satirist/ composer of P.D.Q. Bach fame. The three women, who opened the Concerts by Candlelight series at Laurel Hill mansion in Fairmount Park, made up the Jubal Trio - soprano Christine Schadeberg, flutist Sue Ann Kahn, and harpist Susan Jolles. Smith, who died in March, profoundly influenced young musicians, Kahn among them.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1993 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
A new era dawns for the Philadelphia Orchestra, but each new era is built on the end of another. As music director-designate Wolfgang Sawallisch last month announced plans for his first season, he also announced the resignation of associate conductor William Smith. The resignation was not unexpected, for Smith has had to cancel concerts repeatedly this year because of illness, and was again hospitalized at the time he sent his letter. But his terse note rang like a bell for orchestra members and audiences who have looked upon Smith for 41 years as the embodiment of musical continuity and accessibility.
SPORTS
May 17, 1992 | By Beth Onufrak, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Trenton State will face William Smith for the NCAA Division III women's lacrosse championship today at Lehigh University. The Trenton State Lions (15-0), the defending national champions, topped Roanoke (15-1), 17-3, in a semifinal match yesterday. The Herons (15-0) defeated Ursinus (14-6), 11-4, in the other semifinal match. Lynn Amato, a graduate of Wissahickon, had five goals and an assist to lead the Lions, along with Cathy Swezey. Courtney Dittmann, a graduate of Radnor, led the Maroons with two goals.
NEWS
April 29, 1986 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a quiet conclusion to three weeks of often-bizarre testimony, the defense in the murder trial of former Upper Merion High School principal Jay C. Smith rested its case yesterday without calling Smith to the witness stand. Closing arguments were scheduled for this morning and the jury was expected to begin deliberations later in the day on whether Smith is guilty of the June 1979 slayings of teacher Susan Reinert and her two children. Defense attorney William C. Costopoulos said one reason he did not call Smith to testify was because the jury already had heard hours of tape recordings of conversations between Smith and Raymond L. Martray, a former prison inmate who befriended Smith in jail and then turned state's evidence against him. The tapes were secretly recorded by state police with Martray's consent.
NEWS
April 25, 1986 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the evening she was last seen alive, 11-year-old Karen Reinert was wearing a green pin identical to one later discovered by police in the car owned by former Upper Merion High School principal Jay C. Smith, according to testimony yesterday in Smith's murder trial. Beth Ann Brook, the granddaughter of a woman who lived next door to the Reinert family, testified that she was certain that Karen had been wearing the pin, which she had received during a class trip to the Philadelphia Museum of Art about three months earlier.
NEWS
March 19, 1986 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
A judge yesterday postponed a ruling on whether former Upper Merion High School principal Jay C. Smith must pay any of the defense costs to be incurred during his forthcoming trial on charges that he killed English teacher Susan Reinert and her two children. Dauphin County Senior Judge William W. Lipsitt withheld a ruling in order to give the state attorney general's office an opportunity to review checks written on Smith's behalf by his brother, William Smith, who has been managing Smith's finances during the seven years Smith has been in jail.
NEWS
December 5, 1986 | By Frederick Cusick, Inquirer Staff Writer
William T. Smith, one of the government's main witnesses at the bribery trial of state Treasurer R. Budd Dwyer, wept on the witness stand yesterday as he described how he had agreed to cooperate with prosecutors after learning that his wife would probably go to jail if he did not. Smith, 49, former co-chairman of the Dauphin County Republican Party, began weeping as he was being questioned by Dwyer's attorney, Paul Killion, about the terms of...
SPORTS
December 28, 1997 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Rashid Bey scored 24 points, and St. Joseph's rallied in the second half to defeat Mississippi State, 65-58, last night and advance to the championship game of the Sun Classic. Duval Simmonds added 11 points, and Harold Rasul collected 10 points, 10 rebounds and six assists for the Hawks, who trailed the Bulldogs (10-2) by 28-27 at halftime. The Hawks (3-3) will play Texas-El Paso in tonight's final. UTEP went on a 21-8 run in the final six minutes of the first half and cruised to a 79-60 victory over Penn State in last night's other first-round game.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1995 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
In the middle of a row of composers named Vivaldi, Torelli and Locatelli appeared the name Smith, but to the audience of the Amerita Chamber Players, that last name meant a lot. William Smith, late associate conductor of the Philadelphia Orchestra, had also been deeply involved with this ensemble that is devoted to playing Italian baroque works. His wife, flutist Deborah Carter, is now artistic director, and she had programmed Serenade, the work Smith wrote for her in the '60s.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 13, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
LISA FRANCHESCA Williams Smith just wouldn't be denied. Even in hospice care, in her final days, she was working to help small African-American businesses in West Palm Beach, Fla., a cause to which she had devoted so much of her energies in recent years. "She had been given six months to live," said her mother, Karen Warrington. "When that happens you are given a choice, whether to live those six months or just wait to die. She chose to live. " Lisa Smith, a multitalented woman who could sing and dance and play the piano and drums, a teacher, business consultant and community activist, died of cancer Thursday at age 53. She lived in West Palm Beach.
NEWS
October 18, 2013 | By Rita Giordano and Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writers
MAPLE SHADE Three people were injured when a NJ Transit minibus nearly flipped over a guardrail Wednesday evening, authorities said. The accident, reported at 6:17 p.m., occurred on East Kings Highway near Route 38. At least two of the injuries were not life-threatening, authorities said. The cause of the accident was under investigation. William Smith, a spokesman for NJ Transit, said the bus was an Access Link vehicle that provides paratransit service and is similar to a minibus.
NEWS
October 3, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
In December 2009, NJ Transit announced four major advancements in transportation for South Jersey, with an initial cost of $13.5 million. Nearly four years later, none of the projects has moved beyond the study phase:   Planners have spent the four years and $735,000 studying how to improve rail service on the Atlantic City Line, with nothing to show for their efforts yet. By contrast, it took only 90 days to build the Philadelphia &...
NEWS
August 11, 2013 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saying his fellow officers have called him heartless and "the Tin Man" for writing speeding tickets and making DUI arrests, a Morrisville police officer is suing them and his department for harassment, the latest episode in a borough roiling with turmoil. William Smith also alleges that a fellow officer, Erica McIntyre, continually tried to embarrass him by exposing her breasts and underwear, and asking him salacious questions. The suit, filed last week in Bucks County Court, provides further evidence of a fractious police department and borough administration.
NEWS
March 24, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William H. Smith, 88, of Bristol Borough, a painter, sculptor, and advertising professional, died of heart failure March 20 at Silver Lake Center, a nursing home in Bristol. Mr. Smith first gained recognition when, as a teenager, he painted a series of murals on African American history at Frederick Douglass High School in Baltimore, from which he graduated in 1939. His daughter, Claire, a former sports columnist for The Inquirer and the New York Times, said his paintings had been exhibited at the U.S. embassy in Oman, the Smithsonian Institution, and the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
October 25, 2008 | By Kia Gregory INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At his sentencing hearing yesterday, facing a mandatory life term for killing a 16-year-old for his dirt bike, Eric Smith had nothing but excuses. He blamed his lawyer, the judge, and even the jury, while the two families devastated by his violent actions wept in court. "Nobody can judge me," said Smith, 18, standing before Judge Shelley Robins New with his hands cuffed in front of him. "Nobody can judge me but God. " "God doesn't want you," yelled Yanessa Navarro, 19, sister of Luis Navarro Jr., who in July was shot and killed in Tacony Creek Park, where he had gone to ride his new bike.
NEWS
March 6, 2005 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
William Henry Smith paints stories. In his mind's eye, he sees three brothers gathered around a table. The oldest boy is teaching the younger ones to draw. Behind them stands Smith, holding a pipe, offering advice to his sons. This is Smith's next story, one he plans to put to paper this month. For Smith, whose career as an artist spans 65 years, the message is, "Let the kids draw. " "Give a child a box of Crayolas. If he doesn't eat it first, he will draw," said Smith, of Bristol Borough, who is preparing for an exhibition in Washington next year.
NEWS
May 18, 2001 | By Herb Drill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
William A. Smith, 83, of Churchville, a retired lumber-industry executive who did community service, died Tuesday at the Richboro Care Center in Bucks County after an illness. Before retiring, he was vice president of Boston-based Furman Lumber Co. for 20 years and helped start the firm's Philadelphia operation. He was a sales representative in the wholesale lumber business for more than a half-century. Mr. Smith was born in Pittsburgh and reared in Philadelphia, where he graduated from Frankford High School in 1935.
SPORTS
November 3, 2000 | By Doug Hadden, FOR THE INQUIRER
Chester Valley's Jonathan Doctor and LuLu's Jeff Haas each won singles matches and teamed together for a four-ball victory to help the Philadelphia team beat Central Pennsylvania, 13 1/2-10 1/2, and retain the cup in the eighth annual Dick Smith Cup Matches yesterday at Mays Landing Country Club. Each of the two 12-player teams consisted of assistant pros from the Philadelphia Section PGA, who competed in foursome (alternate-shot), four-ball (better-ball) and singles matches. THE RESULTS Singles matches (Phila.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1999 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
In a Center City woodworking shop near the Schuylkill River, Jeanne Jaffe is energetically power-sanding the ridges, left by a shaping tool, from a new piece of sculpture. At the same moment, a dozen blocks north on the other side of the parkway, painter William Smith is methodically refining the underdrawings of two small pictures destined to become moody, atmospheric landscapes. Both Jaffe and Smith are creating new work for solo exhibitions that will contribute to the yeasty mix of a new art season.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|