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Willie Nelson

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1987 | By Jack Hurst, Special to The Inquirer
Willie Nelson's daughter, Susie, whose biography of Nelson and his family, Heart Worn Memories (Eakin Press, $17.95), has recently been published, says some of her most treasured memories are of her childhood in the Nashville exurbs, when the family's life was comparatively normal. "Dad was a pig farmer," she recalls. "He'd get up in the morning, go milk the cows and take care of the pigs. And he'd write (songs). " Nelson did a lot of his songwriting in Nashville at the office of a small publishing company called Pamper Music, she remembers, but she doesn't remember her siblings, Lana and Billy, being very impressed with the importance of what he was doing.
NEWS
July 23, 2002 | By Nathaniel FriedmanFOR THE INQUIRER
Willie Nelson clearly felt that his recording career was in need of a renaissance. For his January release, The Great Divide, everyone's favorite rough-hewn outlaw teamed up with Santana producer Matt Serletic, and shared the microphone with Kid Rock, Sheryl Crow and Brian McKnight. But while on record artists constantly need to generate new product, live they're often expected to dwell in the past, sometimes to a fault. That was not the case Sunday night at the Mann Center, where Nelson played his greatest hits because they remain relevant, not for nostalgia's sake.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1994 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Although an attempt in the early '80s to turn Atlantic City into Nashville by the Sea did not quite click, a similar rush of country-music bookings a few years ago met with far more success. The trend leveled off somewhat, but plenty of country entertainers are still showing up in the casino-hotel showrooms. Just this week are appearances by Willie Nelson - who will be joined by John McEuen of Nitty Gritty Dirt Band fame - at the Sands tonight through Sunday, and Tim McGraw and Blackhawk at the Taj Mahal on Thursday.
NEWS
January 24, 1991 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributors to this report include the Associated Press, Reuters, the New York Post and USA Today
The IRS had its first go at the selling of Willie Nelson's possessions yesterday, but afterward agents wouldn't say how much was raised to satisfy the country star's $16.7 million tax bill. About 200 bidders turned out at Nelson's Pedernales Country Club in Briarcliff, Texas, for the first of three IRS auctions of the singer's belongings. Most of the items were low-ticket ones, including a microwave oven, a ladder, two vacuum cleaners, a belt with silver and turquoise buckle and a safe.
NEWS
August 22, 1988 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, Knight-Ridder News Service and United Press International
Baylor University canceled a Willie Nelson concert in Waco, Texas - and the good ol' boy is angry enough to spit. "They do really make me mad when they tell me I can't play in Waco," Nelson said in an interview with the Houston Chronicle. "Waco's my home town. It gets my red Irish hair up. " The comment wasn't self-pity; his pockets wouldn't be empty. Heck, he was doing it to give away money. The Waco concert was to be a benefit for depositors at a failed private bank in the nearby town of Leroy.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2010 | By Howard Gensler
BIG NEWS in the world of entertainment yesterday as country- music legend Willie Nelson cut his hair. Willie's lengthy, reddish pigtails - as if Crystal Gayle and Pippi Longstocking merged their locks - have been one of his signature features since he was a young crew-cut crooner. Spokeswoman Elaine Schock said of Willie's waist-length hair: "There's a lot of maintenance. " After a season judging singers on "American Idol," Ellen DeGeneres announced on her show yesterday that she is starting a label called eleveneleven.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1988 | By Jack Hurst, Special to The Inquirer
In his new autobiography, Willie (Simon & Schuster, $19.95), Willie Nelson recalls how he sold two of his most-popular songs, "Family Bible" and "Night Life," for $50 and $150 respectively. The transactions occurred just before he moved to Nashville from Houston, he says in the book, and the songs were sold to a musician friend named Paul Buskirk. "Family Bible" came out first and, he recalls, his name "wasn't even on it. But I was really glad to know I could write a number-one song.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1999 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
America is on a first-name basis with Willie Nelson. Everyone knows who he is: the Troublemaker, Shotgun Willie, the Outlaw, the Red-Headed Stranger, a Highwayman, the American farmers' Robin Hood. In short, one of the pillars in the tower of American song. Thursday night at the Keswick, this national treasure - the kind of guy who would give you the bandanna off his head if you needed it - offered a rollicking two-hour overview of his storied career. Playing before a giant Texas state flag, the 66-year-old was in fine voice and backed by his limber, longtime touring band: Jody Payne on acoustic guitar; B. Spears on bass; sister Bobbie Nelson on piano; Dennis Miller look-alike Mickey Raphael on harmonica; and drummer Paul English, who played only a snare drum, motoring the majority of the songs with a simple rolling shuffle.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1995 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Tom Moon and Bruce Warren also contributed
There are two package country shows coming to town this week, one old- fashioned and imperfect and anything but slick, and the other about as uptown and carefully packaged as hillbilly music gets. Each, though, is worth recommending. Tonight at Valley Forge Music Fair, Willie Nelson shares the stage with openers Asleep at the Wheel. The shame of it is, there won't be any place to dance: Willie, who's on a roll with the ready-for-the-honkytonk Just One Love (Justice) and a 3-CD A Classic & Unreleased Collection (Rhino)
NEWS
January 5, 1991 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, Washington Post and USA Today
For all the taxes he's owed before, a house in Gleed, Wash., owned by Willie Nelson was auctioned yesterday by the IRS for $50,500 - just a fraction of his overdue bill. The house was valued at $72,000. Bidding started at $28,500 and ended at $50,500. The buyer, who wouldn't identify himself, also assumes the $18,000 still owed on the 1,600-square foot house. Nelson bought the home, near Yakima, for his mother, Myrle Harvey, in 1976. She lived there until she died in 1983.
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NEWS
June 30, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, Staff Writer
Leon Bridges, the 26-year-old rhythm-and-blues singer with the 50-year-old soul, will bring his high-waisted vintage slacks and his playful-to-prayerful love songs to the July 4th Wawa Welcome America! party on the Ben Franklin Parkway. Bridges, who channels Ben E. King's "Stand by Me" and Sam Cooke's "You Send Me" every time he sings his neo-soul serenades, is a young master of old-school vulnerability. "The world leaves a bitter taste in my mouth, girl," he laments on "Coming Home," the title song on his breakout 2015 debut album, which skyrocketed him from obscurity to omnipresence on the concert circuit.
NEWS
April 17, 2016 | Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
Way back in 1975, Waylon Jennings posed the question that still frames the debate of what it means to be a country music rebel. Sneering at "rhinestone suits and new shiny cars" and "the same old tune, fiddle and guitar" that he saw and heard as signs of commercial indulgence and artistic stasis, the outlaw icon asked: "Are you sure Hank done it this way?" Hank, of course, would be Hank Williams, the Hillbilly Shakespeare who is the subject of Marc Abraham's widely panned, Tom Hiddleston-starring new movie, I Saw The Light . Hank Sr.'s pithy, honky-tonk oeuvre is the bedrock that modern country music was built on. For the twangphobic who might profess to, in the words of a Robbie Fulks song, like "Any Kind of Music But Country," he's sort of like Kurt Cobain in a cowboy hat: a hard-living tragic genius dead before he got out of his 20s who's remained a touchstone of incorruptible authenticity ever since.
NEWS
April 8, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Staff Writer
Merle Haggard, the outlaw hero and ornery individualist unmatched in country music history as a triple-threat singer, songwriter, and bandleader who combined common-man eloquence with intrepid musical adventurousness, died Wednesday. It was his 79th birthday. The country icon was a living, breathing, still-hard-touring exemplar of unvarnished honky-tonk authenticity. He was revered, along with George Jones, who died in 2013, as a baritone singer of extraordinary sensitivity and feeling.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Ryan "Gooch" Nelson is a lucky man. At 30, the bluesy slide guitarist and his band Gooch and the Motion just signed with famed Philadelphia producer Joe Nicolo's new label, Blackbird, for a debut album ( Comin' Home ) that will have its release party at World Cafe Live on Thursday. Sure, Nelson is fortunate to have a singing style and guitar sound that's deeply reminiscent of his inspirations (Tom Waits, Duane Allman), as well as romantic and unique. But he's also a quadriplegic cancer survivor, so the act of, say, watching March Madness basketball with the windows open in his home in Woodstown, N.J., makes him feel just as lucky.
NEWS
March 6, 2016
Loretta Lynn Full Circle (Legacy ***) Willie Nelson Summertime: Willie Nelson Sings Gershwin (Legacy ***1/2) A pair of all-time great octogenarians, still going strong. A new Willie Nelson disc is not an infrequent occurrence - this is the Red Headed Stranger's 10th this decade, if you include collaborations. But a new collection from Loretta Lynn is a rarer treat: Full Circle is her first since the 2004 Jack White partnership Van Lear Rose.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2016 | By Tom Wilk, For The Inquirer
Since forming Asleep at the Wheel in 1970, Ray Benson has seen his band win 10 Grammy Awards, play for the last three U.S. presidents, and perform more than 100 shows annually. Honored in October with a star on Philadelphia's Walk of Fame, the 6-foot-7 bandleader offered a short explanation for his success at the ceremony. "How did a Jewish kid from Philadelphia become a western swing icon?" Benson asked. "Two words: Sally Starr. " The longtime children's television host caught the young Benson's eye with her western wardrobe.
NEWS
February 7, 2016
Loretta Lynn, "Who's Gonna Miss Me?" The latest cut from the 83-year-old honky-tonk angel's album Full Circle (there's also an Elvis Costello collaboration, "Everything It Takes") looks death in the eye the way classic country songs used to do. Out now, album due March 4. "Miles Ahead" trailer. The teaser to the Don Cheadle-starring and -directed biopic on the brilliant, iconoclastic jazz trumpeter Miles Davis hit the Web last week. Whether it turns out to be a great movie or not, the film, which opens in April, clearly is going to have an electric presence at its center in Cheadle.
SPORTS
January 10, 2016 | By Vegas Vic, For the Daily News
REDSKINS (+1) over Packers You know how much we love Mr. Discount Double Check ( Aaron Rodgers ), but this game is gonna be all about Mr. You Like That ( Kirk Cousins ). Washington will be giving away thousands of "You Like That" rally towels, and if any of you are gonna be at the game, save me one. We also have made fun of the NFC "Least" all year long, but this team from D.C. is doing some really superb stuff . . . especially Cousins. Since Week 7, he leads the league in completion percentage (72.4)
NEWS
January 10, 2016
Shadowhunters 9 p.m. Tuesday on Freeform (formerly ABC Family) Katherine McNamara stars as human-angel hybrid Clary Fray in a live-action adaptation of Cassandra Clare's YA novel The Mortal Instruments . Second Chance 9 p.m. Wednesday on Fox A couple of really rich folks bring a dead corrupt cop (Rob Kazinsky) back to life, Frankenstein-style. Teachers 11 p.m. Wednesday on TV Land A sitcom about a group of wacky elementary-school teachers based on a Web series by Chicago improv group the Katydids.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2015 | Howard Gensler
Snoop Dogg has his own line of marijuana. So does Willie Nelson . Melissa Etheridge has a marijuana-infused wine. (Now there's red for meat, white for fish and Etheridge for M&Ms.) So why is Tattle having such a difficult time launching our pot-infused ginger ale - Cannabis Dry. Or our idea for a SEPTA Tokin'. Or our get high french fry made from a new strain of pot-ato. Guess potheads think Snoop has more cachet. Snoop calls his eight strains of weed "Dank From the Doggfather Himself.
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