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Wills

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NEWS
February 20, 1991 | By Peter Finn, Special to The Inquirer
Eugene Feldman, the Camden County surrogate, was pacing the room and talking with a volubility that defied his subject: death and, more particularly, dying. "Modern technology has done tremendous things for us in keeping us alive," Feldman said. "But in some cases, it has done too good a job. People are tired of not dying. " A wave of assent, like revival amens, rippled from about 20 senior citizens who had gathered to listen to Feldman at the Brendenwood Retirement Community in Voorhees.
NEWS
October 21, 1987 | By Virginia M. Resnik, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteer firefighters in Camden County have the opportunity to have their wills drawn up by a lawyer free of charge under a new program offered through the Camden County Surrogate's Office. For the last two years, the office has run a program offering free wills to senior citizens, according to Gene Feldman, the county surrogate. Under that program, about 3,500 wills have been drawn up. Now, the will service is being offered to volunteer firefighters because they place their lives at risk for the sake of their communities without pay, Feldman said.
NEWS
July 17, 2015
J OSEPH DOUGHERTY, the 73-year-old former labor leader awaiting sentencing next week on a federal racketeering conviction, just found out the hard way that not even Shakespeare can soften the blow of a judge's gavel. U.S. District Judge Michael Baylson yesterday rejected Dougherty's Hail Mary motion for an acquittal or a new trial. Baylson began the ruling thusly: "Who finds the heifer dead and bleeding fresh, And sees fast by a butcher with an axe, But will suspect 'twas he that made the slaughter?"
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloucester County Surrogate Donald H. Wagner harshly criticized Freeholder Jay H. Sharp last night for suggesting that there may be improprieties in the program providing free wills for senior citizens. Sharp, a Republican seeking re-election, said last week that he was concerned about where the funds for the surrogate's program were kept and about the propriety of Wagner's selecting the lawyer to draw up the wills. "I am hurt and dismayed real deeply regarding some of the comments I've heard made," said Wagner, a Democrat also seeking re-election.
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
The daughter of a wealthy Phoenixville developer yesterday accused her younger brother of forging their parents' wills and cheating her out of her full inheritance. Anita Elizabeth Gerhold, 41, of Greenfield, Pa., testified in Chester County Court at the forgery trial of her brother Richard J. Puleo, 34, that their father, Joseph Puleo Sr., had property and other assets valued at more than $4.3 million. In a 1981 will signed by the father, Gerhold said that she, Richard Puleo and two older brothers were made co-executors and shared equally in the estate.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Phoenixville lawyer, charged with drawing up bogus wills for his parents to reduce his sister's inheritance, was acquitted of forgery and related offenses yesterday by a Chester County jury. Richard J. Puleo, 33, the youngest son of a wealthy Phoenixville developer, testified Wednesday that his father, Joseph A. Puleo Sr. and his mother, Lena Puleo, had given him power of attorney to handle their legal affairs. Richard Puleo said he believed that this authority made it legal for him to sign his parents' names to their wills.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
James F. Proud, Delaware County's register of wills and a solicitor for several area towns, was nominated by Gov. Ridge yesterday to fill a county judgeship left vacant in April. The nomination of the 51-year-old Wallingford Republican is subject to confirmation by the Senate. It comes after five months of chatter in the Delaware County Courthouse about whom the governor would nominate. Proud, often touted as professional and hard-working, was long considered the top choice.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Whoever thought that probating wills would be such an attractive job? As the primary nears in Gloucester County, it's the office of surrogate that is getting all of the attention - and is causing the most problems for both political parties. Neither party expected to have a primary contest, but when longtime political figure Donald Wagner announced early this year that he would be retiring from the Surrogate's Office, the field opened wide, prompting both parties to open their coffers and take sides.
NEWS
July 1, 2016
ISSUE | CAMPAIGN 2016 A battle of wills Stalwart conservative columnist George Will announced that he has left the Republican Party because of presumptive presidential nominee Donald Trump, stating, "This is not my party" ("George Will leaves GOP over Trump," Sunday). Instead of trying to convince Will of the error of his ways, Trump wrote on Twitter that Will is "one of the most overrated political pundits (who lost his way long ago). . . . He's made many bad calls. " Folks ought to be growing weary of this shtick, which Trump appears compelled to repeat ad nauseam.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The federal government may soon require hospitals and doctors to give patients information on living wills, documents that allow people to stipulate when they want life-support systems turned off. Critics say that the move would result in government-sanctioned mercy killings, but supporters say it would help prevent patients from being kept alive against their wishes. A provision in a deficit-cutting bill approved early Saturday by the Senate Finance Committee would require hospitals and doctors participating in the Medicare program to ask patients if they had signed a living will and to offer information about the wills to interested adults.
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SPORTS
August 19, 2016 | By Bill Fleischman, For the Daily News
THE GOOD NEWS for racing fans is, the Verizon IndyCar series will be running 200 mph laps at Pocono Raceway next year and in 2018. I was surprised when the two-year extension was announced last week. The vibe I was getting was Sunday's ABC Supply 500 might be the last IndyCar event at Pocono. In the three years since IndyCar returned to Pocono, the crowds have diminished from the first year's crowd of an estimated 20,000 to 25,000. Conceding that attendance for IndyCar at Pocono is not what track officials hoped for, Brandon Igdalsky, the track's president and CEO, said Monday: "We've lowered our expectations.
NEWS
August 18, 2016
By Cynthia M. Allen The headlines the morning of July 26 were grim, as they are too often these days. The Rev. Jacques Hamel, an 85-year-old Roman Catholic priest, was murdered at the altar while saying Mass in a church in Rouen, France. His assailants, two teenage males armed with knives, reportedly declared their allegiance to the Islamic State before slaughtering him beneath the crucifix. As he lay dying, he is said to have whispered, "Go away, Satan," to the teens, whose actions were motivated by hatred.
NEWS
August 18, 2016 | By Daniel Block, Staff Writer
Norristown has assets that other towns would envy: Excellent transportation access, proximity to employment centers, the seat of one of the state's wealthiest counties. Yet it has not enjoyed the prosperity of its counterparts in Bucks, Chester, and Delaware Counties - Doylestown, West Chester, and Media, respectively - and Norristown has issues that no other town would envy, including high crime, poverty, and property-tax rates. But after years of false starts, regional planners think that a major highway-construction project could be just the thing that can get the municipality on the road to recovery.
NEWS
August 18, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
For the 34 years that florist Rick Cuneo has been leasing the Cherry Hill Flower Barn on Route 70, he says, "I never know what each day will bring. " One customer might want to discuss flowers for a wedding, another for a funeral, and the next for a birthday, a graduation, or an anniversary. Want it with a white swan theme? Something nautical? Wizard of Oz? No problem. Then, on July 21, a neighbor walked in and floored Cuneo with a piece of paper. "Have you seen this?" the man asked.
SPORTS
August 17, 2016 | By Zach Berman, STAFF WRITER
Malcolm Jenkins completed his best season in the NFL by earning a Pro Bowl trip as a safety in 2015, except Jenkins pointed out that his production came because he was not always the safety. Jenkins moved to slot cornerback when the Eagles played nickel defense last season, allowing him to thrive in a role he feels he plays best. Now he is entering his eighth season in the NFL in a new scheme, but he's hoping it includes the responsibilities he held last season. "My best years in this league since I stepped in, playing the slot has been my most productive," Jenkins said.
SPORTS
August 16, 2016 | By Mike Jensen, STAFF WRITER
The Olympics may be on the big screen at Tir na Nog at 16th and Arch Streets but not for long on a Sunday morning. Ask a bartender if it's possible to get the hurling on at 10:30, he'll say, "It will be. " On the big screen, and the little screen across, and the side screen, and also in the back room. You need to listen to the pregame or postgame show? You can hear it in the men's room. That's why Mick Daly - born, he said, in the lobby of the Granville Hotel in Waterford on Christmas Eve, 1962 - was in Tir na Nog on a Sunday morning.
TRAVEL
August 15, 2016
Sun protection is all about coverage. So why do so many sun hats start so promising but stop so short? Wide brims are all well and good for shading our faces, but what about our shoulders and backs? That's what the folks at CoolHeads had in mind when they came up with this airy, soft terry cloth head covering that drapes over the head, forehead, shoulders and back. The CoolHeads sun hat looks like a cross between a towel and a hood, much like the traditional keffiya head scarf worn in the Middle East.
NEWS
August 13, 2016
CHICAGO - Seated in his office here, wearing neither a necktie nor a frown, Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner is remarkably relaxed for someone at the epicenter of a crisis now in its second year and with no end in sight. But, then, stress is pointless when the situation is hopeless. Besides, if you can ignore the fact that self-government is failing in the nation's fifth-most populous state, you can see real artistry in the self-dealing by the Democrats who, with veto-proof majorities in the state Legislature, have reduced this state they control to insolvency.
NEWS
August 13, 2016 | By Barbara Boyer, Staff Writer
It's all about respect, according to Amir Miller, who pulled his business out of Cherry Hill Mall last month after he was told to stop selling T-shirts calling for an end to police brutality. Since then, Miller has received a corporate apology. He was invited to bring his business, Teary Eyez, back to the mall to sell a variety of T-shirts again, including the ones that raised the controversy. He also is planning to open a shop in Newport News, Va., where the same corporation owns another mall, Miller said.
NEWS
August 12, 2016
Police and firefighters searched into the night Wednesday for a man who had jumped from the Chestnut Street bridge into the Schuylkill without success. Police said the man was seen jumping from the bridge about 4:50 p.m. Two other men entered the water to try to save him, but the man, who appeared to be homeless, refused their help and disappeared in the water. Police divers called off the search after it became dark. They were to resume their search Thursday morning. - Robert Moran
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