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Wills

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NEWS
February 20, 1991 | By Peter Finn, Special to The Inquirer
Eugene Feldman, the Camden County surrogate, was pacing the room and talking with a volubility that defied his subject: death and, more particularly, dying. "Modern technology has done tremendous things for us in keeping us alive," Feldman said. "But in some cases, it has done too good a job. People are tired of not dying. " A wave of assent, like revival amens, rippled from about 20 senior citizens who had gathered to listen to Feldman at the Brendenwood Retirement Community in Voorhees.
NEWS
October 21, 1987 | By Virginia M. Resnik, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteer firefighters in Camden County have the opportunity to have their wills drawn up by a lawyer free of charge under a new program offered through the Camden County Surrogate's Office. For the last two years, the office has run a program offering free wills to senior citizens, according to Gene Feldman, the county surrogate. Under that program, about 3,500 wills have been drawn up. Now, the will service is being offered to volunteer firefighters because they place their lives at risk for the sake of their communities without pay, Feldman said.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloucester County Surrogate Donald H. Wagner harshly criticized Freeholder Jay H. Sharp last night for suggesting that there may be improprieties in the program providing free wills for senior citizens. Sharp, a Republican seeking re-election, said last week that he was concerned about where the funds for the surrogate's program were kept and about the propriety of Wagner's selecting the lawyer to draw up the wills. "I am hurt and dismayed real deeply regarding some of the comments I've heard made," said Wagner, a Democrat also seeking re-election.
NEWS
July 17, 2015
J OSEPH DOUGHERTY, the 73-year-old former labor leader awaiting sentencing next week on a federal racketeering conviction, just found out the hard way that not even Shakespeare can soften the blow of a judge's gavel. U.S. District Judge Michael Baylson yesterday rejected Dougherty's Hail Mary motion for an acquittal or a new trial. Baylson began the ruling thusly: "Who finds the heifer dead and bleeding fresh, And sees fast by a butcher with an axe, But will suspect 'twas he that made the slaughter?"
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
The daughter of a wealthy Phoenixville developer yesterday accused her younger brother of forging their parents' wills and cheating her out of her full inheritance. Anita Elizabeth Gerhold, 41, of Greenfield, Pa., testified in Chester County Court at the forgery trial of her brother Richard J. Puleo, 34, that their father, Joseph Puleo Sr., had property and other assets valued at more than $4.3 million. In a 1981 will signed by the father, Gerhold said that she, Richard Puleo and two older brothers were made co-executors and shared equally in the estate.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Phoenixville lawyer, charged with drawing up bogus wills for his parents to reduce his sister's inheritance, was acquitted of forgery and related offenses yesterday by a Chester County jury. Richard J. Puleo, 33, the youngest son of a wealthy Phoenixville developer, testified Wednesday that his father, Joseph A. Puleo Sr. and his mother, Lena Puleo, had given him power of attorney to handle their legal affairs. Richard Puleo said he believed that this authority made it legal for him to sign his parents' names to their wills.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
James F. Proud, Delaware County's register of wills and a solicitor for several area towns, was nominated by Gov. Ridge yesterday to fill a county judgeship left vacant in April. The nomination of the 51-year-old Wallingford Republican is subject to confirmation by the Senate. It comes after five months of chatter in the Delaware County Courthouse about whom the governor would nominate. Proud, often touted as professional and hard-working, was long considered the top choice.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Whoever thought that probating wills would be such an attractive job? As the primary nears in Gloucester County, it's the office of surrogate that is getting all of the attention - and is causing the most problems for both political parties. Neither party expected to have a primary contest, but when longtime political figure Donald Wagner announced early this year that he would be retiring from the Surrogate's Office, the field opened wide, prompting both parties to open their coffers and take sides.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The federal government may soon require hospitals and doctors to give patients information on living wills, documents that allow people to stipulate when they want life-support systems turned off. Critics say that the move would result in government-sanctioned mercy killings, but supporters say it would help prevent patients from being kept alive against their wishes. A provision in a deficit-cutting bill approved early Saturday by the Senate Finance Committee would require hospitals and doctors participating in the Medicare program to ask patients if they had signed a living will and to offer information about the wills to interested adults.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 18, 2016
Mitch Daniels, former governor of Indiana and current president of Purdue University, knows that no one in the audience is there to hear a commencement speaker. When, however, he addressed his institution's Class of 2016, it heard him distill into a few lapidary paragraphs a stance toward life that illuminates this political season. A rite of spring in America is, Daniels noted, the dispensing of diplomas that are similar in what they announce but dissimilar in what they actually denote.
NEWS
June 18, 2016
The City Council on Thursday approved a 1.5 cent-per-ounce tax on soda - both regular and diet - and on other drinks containing sugar. Here's how much more you might have to pay for your container of soda if the tax on distributors is passed along to consumers. 10 oz. bottle/can ........... 15 cents. 12 oz. bottle/can ........... 18 cents. 16 oz. bottle/can ........... 24 cents. 20 oz. bottle ............... 30 cents. 32 oz. bottle ............... 48 cents. 1 liter (33.81 oz.)
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Anne McNally
I HAVE BEEN opposed to the city's beverage tax from the beginning. In conversations with customers of my establishment, family and friends, I would argue that it unfairly targets small businesses and restaurants like mine. "It's for the kids," and "we need investments in parks," are common rebuttals I would face. Over the past several days, we started to learn the truth. This tax isn't just about the kid - it's also about fattening the city's coffers. I watched the final Council hearing with bated breath, hoping that those I had recently voted for would have some sense and care for my business.
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer and Janaki Chadha, STAFF WRITERS
In recent decades, the LGBT community has mobilized for the AIDS crisis, the repeal of "Don't Ask Don't Tell," and same-sex marriage. In the wake of the massacre at a gay nightclub in Orlando, some are now urging their gay and lesbian brethren to galvanize around the issue of gun violence. Others say they may support the cause, but must remain focused on equality battles still being waged. "Gun safety has not been a major issue for the LGBT community, but now it must be," wrote Eric Sasson, a columnist for the website The Daily Good . His article calls for action on both the national and grassroots levels targeting politicians, companies, investment funds and universities that support gun rights, as well as companies that manufacture weapons.
SPORTS
June 16, 2016 | By Mike Kern, Staff Writer
OAKMONT, Pa. - Once upon a time, golf had a "Big Three. " And it was, well, historically significant. Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer and Gary Player. Among them, they won 34 majors. And when "The King" got too old, Lee Trevino assumed the role of third musketeer. He would add six majors, one shy of Arnie. Later, Tom Watson came along and got eight more. Some haul, for an extended era. When Tiger Woods ruled the food chain, his only real rival was chasing the Nicklaus legacy.
BUSINESS
June 16, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
First, the news: David Haas and the Wyncote Foundation will give a combined $5 million to an endowment that seeks to secure the future of quality journalism in the Philadelphia region - and help the Inquirer, the Daily News, and Philly.com in particular. Now, the news about the news: A Knight Foundation study released Wednesday examines the challenges facing Philadelphia Media Network, owner of the newspapers and website, and deems them considerable. For a major news company to thrive in the future, the study said, it needs to spend now on innovation and experimentation.
NEWS
June 15, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, POLITICS WRITER
CLEVELAND - Hillary Clinton stepped to a lectern shorn of the usual campaign sign and spoke in somber tones about the need for national unity and resolve - and tougher gun laws - in response to the deadly attack on a gay nightclub in Orlando. "Today is not a day for politics," Clinton said in her first campaign trip since nailing down the Democratic nomination, her plans to talk about manufacturing scrapped. The deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history shook up the presidential campaign Monday, offering a potentially defining moment before the parties' national conventions, a June surprise instead of an October one. To a hushed crowd on a factory floor, Clinton argued for a set of policies to take on the threat of "lone-wolf" terrorists inspired by the Islamic State but not directed by any group.
NEWS
June 15, 2016 | Daily News Staff Writers
In the Agenda, the Daily News will examine a major issue of the day in Philadelphia sports. We will frame the question and look at it from multiple angles, bringing you opinions from a sports staff unmatched in its experience. The Agenda will run occasionally, only in the Daily News. Les Bowen If I had to bet this question, my money would be on Rodney McLeod. McLeod is assured of starting at safety for the Eagles if he's healthy, and he's played in every game since he arrived in St. Louis as an undrafted free agent from Virginia in 2012, so the odds are with me there.
NEWS
June 15, 2016
By Darrell L. Clarke, Bobby Henon, Blondell Reynolds Brown, and Bill Greenlee On Thursday, City Council will pass a progressive budget that makes historic investments in our children, public spaces, and long-term economic vitality, and demonstrates that cities can rise above the political paralysis gripping state capitals and Washington. We commend Mayor Kenney and his staff for a bold first budget and for a collaborative and productive process. Communication with Council was key to building consensus and producing a final budget that is fiscally responsible and equitable.
SPORTS
June 12, 2016 | By Joe Juliano, STAFF WRITER
Wes Short Jr. is just 2 strokes off the lead at the halfway point of the Constellation Senior Players Championship, the third major of the PGA Tour Champions season. But Short has to be careful to keep his mind on matters at the Philadelphia Cricket Club, and not have it wander off to the western part of Pennsylvania for what is waiting for him starting Monday at Oakmont Country Club. Short, 52, in his third season on the Champions tour, qualified Monday for the U.S. Open, the first time he made it to the national championship after what he called "25 or maybe 30 years" of going through the process.
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