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Wills

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NEWS
February 20, 1991 | By Peter Finn, Special to The Inquirer
Eugene Feldman, the Camden County surrogate, was pacing the room and talking with a volubility that defied his subject: death and, more particularly, dying. "Modern technology has done tremendous things for us in keeping us alive," Feldman said. "But in some cases, it has done too good a job. People are tired of not dying. " A wave of assent, like revival amens, rippled from about 20 senior citizens who had gathered to listen to Feldman at the Brendenwood Retirement Community in Voorhees.
NEWS
October 21, 1987 | By Virginia M. Resnik, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteer firefighters in Camden County have the opportunity to have their wills drawn up by a lawyer free of charge under a new program offered through the Camden County Surrogate's Office. For the last two years, the office has run a program offering free wills to senior citizens, according to Gene Feldman, the county surrogate. Under that program, about 3,500 wills have been drawn up. Now, the will service is being offered to volunteer firefighters because they place their lives at risk for the sake of their communities without pay, Feldman said.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloucester County Surrogate Donald H. Wagner harshly criticized Freeholder Jay H. Sharp last night for suggesting that there may be improprieties in the program providing free wills for senior citizens. Sharp, a Republican seeking re-election, said last week that he was concerned about where the funds for the surrogate's program were kept and about the propriety of Wagner's selecting the lawyer to draw up the wills. "I am hurt and dismayed real deeply regarding some of the comments I've heard made," said Wagner, a Democrat also seeking re-election.
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
The daughter of a wealthy Phoenixville developer yesterday accused her younger brother of forging their parents' wills and cheating her out of her full inheritance. Anita Elizabeth Gerhold, 41, of Greenfield, Pa., testified in Chester County Court at the forgery trial of her brother Richard J. Puleo, 34, that their father, Joseph Puleo Sr., had property and other assets valued at more than $4.3 million. In a 1981 will signed by the father, Gerhold said that she, Richard Puleo and two older brothers were made co-executors and shared equally in the estate.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
James F. Proud, Delaware County's register of wills and a solicitor for several area towns, was nominated by Gov. Ridge yesterday to fill a county judgeship left vacant in April. The nomination of the 51-year-old Wallingford Republican is subject to confirmation by the Senate. It comes after five months of chatter in the Delaware County Courthouse about whom the governor would nominate. Proud, often touted as professional and hard-working, was long considered the top choice.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Phoenixville lawyer, charged with drawing up bogus wills for his parents to reduce his sister's inheritance, was acquitted of forgery and related offenses yesterday by a Chester County jury. Richard J. Puleo, 33, the youngest son of a wealthy Phoenixville developer, testified Wednesday that his father, Joseph A. Puleo Sr. and his mother, Lena Puleo, had given him power of attorney to handle their legal affairs. Richard Puleo said he believed that this authority made it legal for him to sign his parents' names to their wills.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Whoever thought that probating wills would be such an attractive job? As the primary nears in Gloucester County, it's the office of surrogate that is getting all of the attention - and is causing the most problems for both political parties. Neither party expected to have a primary contest, but when longtime political figure Donald Wagner announced early this year that he would be retiring from the Surrogate's Office, the field opened wide, prompting both parties to open their coffers and take sides.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The federal government may soon require hospitals and doctors to give patients information on living wills, documents that allow people to stipulate when they want life-support systems turned off. Critics say that the move would result in government-sanctioned mercy killings, but supporters say it would help prevent patients from being kept alive against their wishes. A provision in a deficit-cutting bill approved early Saturday by the Senate Finance Committee would require hospitals and doctors participating in the Medicare program to ask patients if they had signed a living will and to offer information about the wills to interested adults.
NEWS
July 12, 1991 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
It began in 1975, when Joe Quinlan walked into Paul Armstrong's office and told the lawyer he wanted help getting his daughter, Karen Ann, removed from a respirator. That desire, and the New Jersey Supreme Court decision that ultimately allowed it, prompted an international debate on the right to die and spawned the practice of people writing living wills in almost every state in the nation. Yesterday, New Jersey, where the debate began, became the 48th state to legally recognize living wills, the documents that allow people to say in advance what sort of care they want and who should make health-care decisions for them if they become incapacitated.
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SPORTS
October 21, 2014
FOR THE FOURTH time in 5 years, soccer fans in Philadelphia won't witness the hometown club in the MLS playoffs. But at the very least, the Union sent the PPL Park regulars out with a win. "I know we came up short and the focus now, the only word I use around the guys is playoffs for next year," Union interim manager Jim Curtin said after Saturday night's home finale, a 2-1 win over Sporting Kansas City. "We're not going to talk about championships or anything like that. We're talking about the playoffs for 2015 and that's the goal.
BUSINESS
October 21, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
A $253 million bond offering planned for this week by the New Jersey Casino Reinvestment Development Authority includes $60 million that will be paid to Pitney Bowes Inc. for a settlement linked to a renovation of Atlantic City's Boardwalk Hall that started in 1998. New Jersey and Pitney Bowes, of Stamford, Conn., formed a partnership in 2000 to take advantage of federal historic building rehabilitation tax credits in connection with the project at the Boardwalk complex that hosts the Miss America pageant.
SPORTS
October 21, 2014 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
TODAY, JUST as they did last year, the Eagles return from their bye looking toward a date with the Arizona Cardinals. Some things are the same, many things are different for two NFC teams that finished 10-6 last year, the Eagles winning a weak NFC East, the Cards shut out of the playoffs in the powerful NFC West. Had Arizona beaten the Birds last Dec. 1, instead of getting nipped, 24-21, after coming back from a 24-7 second-half deficit, the Cards would have gone to the 2013 playoffs.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
ON THE BLOCK near 17th Street where the image of the fiery and flamboyant civil-rights lawyer Cecil B. Moore once looked down onto the avenue that bears his name, a new building has risen. Near where the colorful mural of Moore once spread across the wall of the now-demolished Adelaide's Variety Store, large banners now proclaim: "Luxury Student Apartments. " On this block near Temple University, each new boxy apartment building has six or more stark, gray electric meters facing the street at eye level.
NEWS
October 16, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
SOME affordable-housing advocates are preparing to tell the new Philadelphia Land Bank that its draft strategic plan needs toughening. The new land bank, which won't be fully operational until 2015, is having a public hearing today on a draft strategic plan that outlines how it will acquire and distribute city-owned vacant land and tax-delinquent properties to new owners. "We think it can be improved," Nora Lichtash, of the Philadelphia Coalition for Affordable Communities, said of the plan.
SPORTS
October 15, 2014 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael Carter-Williams talked Monday about going back to Syracuse, seeing all his old fans. "It's just nice to be home," the Sixers point guard said of Tuesday's exhibition game against the New York Knicks at the Carrier Dome. It would be even nicer if he could play. Carter-Williams and the Sixers' other former Syracuse standout, Jerami Grant, will miss the game because of injuries. Grant, a rookie forward, has been sidelined since the second day of training because of dehydration and a lingering sprained right ankle.
NEWS
October 14, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A little-noticed change in federal law may hurt small neighborhood grocery stores and their low-income customers who use food stamps. In 2004, food stamps went digital, switching from paper coupons to electronic cards. In large supermarkets, such Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) cards are swiped at checkout terminals along with credit and debit cards. But in around 118,000 bodegas, corner stores, and mom-and-pop markets nationwide, EBT cards have been used in specific EBT machines provided to stores free in a federal-state partnership, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which administers the food-stamp program, known as SNAP.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The St. Peter Claver Center for Evangelization in Center City, which has served black Catholics for nearly 30 years, will close at the end of this month, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced. The center, housed in the former St. Peter Claver Roman Catholic Church at 12th and Lombard Streets, a historically black parish, was originally slated to close two years ago amid major archdiocesan cutbacks, including the layoff of a quarter of the staff at headquarters. But the archdiocese's Office for Black Catholics, part of the Secretariat for Evangelization, appealed the decision, and the center was given a reprieve because grants from outside the archdiocese were supporting its programs.
SPORTS
October 10, 2014 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
Marti Wolever thought his job was safe when he was stopped outside the press box at Citizens Bank Park a few days before he made LSU pitcher Aaron Nola his final first-round selection for the Phillies in June. There had been some rumblings that the assistant general manager in charge of amateur scouting could be in trouble because, after years of hitting in the draft, and sometimes big (Cole Hamels, Ryan Howard, Chase Utley), the Phillies found their draft well running dry. Too many Anthony Hewitts, Joe Saverys, and Larry Greenes.
SPORTS
October 9, 2014 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Zac MacMath is back in goal, a place that the confident fourth-year Union keeper never felt he should have left. "You take that and use it as a chip on your shoulder, more reason to prove people wrong and prove that I deserve to be a starter," MacMath said Tuesday about his demotion. The Union's interim manager, Jim Curtin, said MacMath would be in goal for Saturday's crucial game with the Columbus Crew at PPL Park after the team made the expected announcement that Rais Mbolhi would be joining Algeria to compete in the African Cup of Nations.
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