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Wills

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NEWS
February 20, 1991 | By Peter Finn, Special to The Inquirer
Eugene Feldman, the Camden County surrogate, was pacing the room and talking with a volubility that defied his subject: death and, more particularly, dying. "Modern technology has done tremendous things for us in keeping us alive," Feldman said. "But in some cases, it has done too good a job. People are tired of not dying. " A wave of assent, like revival amens, rippled from about 20 senior citizens who had gathered to listen to Feldman at the Brendenwood Retirement Community in Voorhees.
NEWS
October 21, 1987 | By Virginia M. Resnik, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteer firefighters in Camden County have the opportunity to have their wills drawn up by a lawyer free of charge under a new program offered through the Camden County Surrogate's Office. For the last two years, the office has run a program offering free wills to senior citizens, according to Gene Feldman, the county surrogate. Under that program, about 3,500 wills have been drawn up. Now, the will service is being offered to volunteer firefighters because they place their lives at risk for the sake of their communities without pay, Feldman said.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloucester County Surrogate Donald H. Wagner harshly criticized Freeholder Jay H. Sharp last night for suggesting that there may be improprieties in the program providing free wills for senior citizens. Sharp, a Republican seeking re-election, said last week that he was concerned about where the funds for the surrogate's program were kept and about the propriety of Wagner's selecting the lawyer to draw up the wills. "I am hurt and dismayed real deeply regarding some of the comments I've heard made," said Wagner, a Democrat also seeking re-election.
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
The daughter of a wealthy Phoenixville developer yesterday accused her younger brother of forging their parents' wills and cheating her out of her full inheritance. Anita Elizabeth Gerhold, 41, of Greenfield, Pa., testified in Chester County Court at the forgery trial of her brother Richard J. Puleo, 34, that their father, Joseph Puleo Sr., had property and other assets valued at more than $4.3 million. In a 1981 will signed by the father, Gerhold said that she, Richard Puleo and two older brothers were made co-executors and shared equally in the estate.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
James F. Proud, Delaware County's register of wills and a solicitor for several area towns, was nominated by Gov. Ridge yesterday to fill a county judgeship left vacant in April. The nomination of the 51-year-old Wallingford Republican is subject to confirmation by the Senate. It comes after five months of chatter in the Delaware County Courthouse about whom the governor would nominate. Proud, often touted as professional and hard-working, was long considered the top choice.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Phoenixville lawyer, charged with drawing up bogus wills for his parents to reduce his sister's inheritance, was acquitted of forgery and related offenses yesterday by a Chester County jury. Richard J. Puleo, 33, the youngest son of a wealthy Phoenixville developer, testified Wednesday that his father, Joseph A. Puleo Sr. and his mother, Lena Puleo, had given him power of attorney to handle their legal affairs. Richard Puleo said he believed that this authority made it legal for him to sign his parents' names to their wills.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Whoever thought that probating wills would be such an attractive job? As the primary nears in Gloucester County, it's the office of surrogate that is getting all of the attention - and is causing the most problems for both political parties. Neither party expected to have a primary contest, but when longtime political figure Donald Wagner announced early this year that he would be retiring from the Surrogate's Office, the field opened wide, prompting both parties to open their coffers and take sides.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The federal government may soon require hospitals and doctors to give patients information on living wills, documents that allow people to stipulate when they want life-support systems turned off. Critics say that the move would result in government-sanctioned mercy killings, but supporters say it would help prevent patients from being kept alive against their wishes. A provision in a deficit-cutting bill approved early Saturday by the Senate Finance Committee would require hospitals and doctors participating in the Medicare program to ask patients if they had signed a living will and to offer information about the wills to interested adults.
NEWS
July 12, 1991 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
It began in 1975, when Joe Quinlan walked into Paul Armstrong's office and told the lawyer he wanted help getting his daughter, Karen Ann, removed from a respirator. That desire, and the New Jersey Supreme Court decision that ultimately allowed it, prompted an international debate on the right to die and spawned the practice of people writing living wills in almost every state in the nation. Yesterday, New Jersey, where the debate began, became the 48th state to legally recognize living wills, the documents that allow people to say in advance what sort of care they want and who should make health-care decisions for them if they become incapacitated.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
For a rare-book aficionado interested in seeing the tiny handmade dummy books Maurice Sendak fashioned to try out ideas, or for a casual fan curious about the Sendak inside jokes that appeared in early versions of well-known books before disappearing on the way to the publisher, the best place to go for decades has been 2008 Delancey Place in Philadelphia. It has been, in fact, the only place to see a great many specific items that Sendak began placing at the Rosenbach Museum and Library, a treasure house of literary rarities, in 1968.
NEWS
September 16, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
For months, the peculiar saga of a downtown Swedesboro liquor shop owner scaring away customers - many of them shouted down with racial epithets in a manner reminiscent of a bygone era - has been the talk of the borough. Some were shooed from the store without the booze (or, in one case, the Coke) they had come to buy. Others were locked out. A handwritten note on the door warned patrons: "The clerk does not want to talk. " Complaints about store owner Mario "Mike" Falciani's outbursts led the mayor to call him a "known racist.
SPORTS
September 16, 2014 | By Les Bowen, Daily News Staff Writer
INDIANAPOLIS - One of the brightest spots of the Eagles' Week 1 win over Jacksonville was the pressure the Birds managed to bring on Jaguars quarterback Chad Henne. Henne was sacked only three times, but he was under duress a lot more than that. Passes were tipped, passes were hurried, timing was disrupted a lot more than has been common lately for the Eagles' defense, which ranked 32nd against the pass in 2013. Henne completed 12 of his final 27 passes, for 99 yards. Getting that kind of result tonight at Lucas Oil Stadium figures to be a lot tougher.
SPORTS
September 16, 2014 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Although there was no game on the schedule last week for the Temple Owls, little changed about their preparation. They practiced all last week as if they had a game, and on Monday they turned their attention to Saturday's opponent, Delaware State, at Lincoln Financial Field. "We spent the open week really just trying to get better and prepare for Delaware State," Temple coach Matt Rhule said. "We are focused on playing a good football team. " Temple (1-1) looks to bounce back after a 31-24 loss to Navy in its home opener on Sept.
SPORTS
September 15, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ed Snider, looking trim and fit and confirming he is cancer-free after undergoing chemotherapy and radiation, admitted Saturday that patience has not been his best virtue. The Flyers' chairman said new general manager Ron Hextall will help change that. "I think Ron has established a philosophy that is probably long overdue," Snider said after watching the first day of Flyers' rookie camp in Voorhees. "I have probably been a little too anxious to win another Cup. I was very patient when I was young, when we built the winners.
NEWS
September 15, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
THE COLORFUL images of Fats Waller and Bessie Smith painted on the facade of the Royal Theater reflect a past as a film and musical venue designed especially for Philadelphia's African-American community. The Royal, on South Street near 15th, was built in 1920 and is on the city's historic register. But the building has been vacant for more than 40 years, and nearby residents and business owners have become frustrated as it deteriorated into blight. Rather than becoming an anchor to spark development, they said, the Royal had become an anchor that weighed progress down.
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
A top Philadelphia School District magnet will expand next fall, and the Philadelphia School Partnership, a deep-pocketed nonprofit, is footing part of the bill. A $147,000 PSP grant will help pay for Carver High School of Engineering and Science in North Philadelphia to add seventh- and eighth-grade classes next September, officials announced Thursday. The investment in Carver - announced along with a $246,000 grant to the Friere Charter School to fund a strategic plan and new assessment systems - means that PSP has now distributed $35.4 million to grow high-performing city schools of all types.
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Gov. Corbett might not get the memo after all. Despite 40,000 signatures on a petition from school reform advocates and a morning rally outside City Hall, Philadelphia City Council on Thursday killed an effort that would have asked the governor to dissolve the School Reform Commission. In its first meeting since returning from summer recess, Council introduced a flurry of bills but also passed on some legislation left over from the spring term, including a resolution to put a question on the November ballot asking voters if they support abolishing the SRC and returning schools to local control.
SPORTS
September 13, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jake Diekman has a number in mind. The Phillies lefthander understands why he may not reach it. When the team's brain trust informed some of their young relievers they would not pitch with the same frequency in September, it was not punishment. So Diekman, who needs nine more appearances to achieve his 75-game target, is willing to adapt. "If you need a day off," Diekman said, "you just need to tell them. " That is a culture the Phillies are happy to create among their burgeoning arms.
SPORTS
September 12, 2014 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
BACK WHEN the Eagles were zipping through all 16 games, plus their playoff appearance, with the same five starting offensive linemen, continuity was important. Now that they're heading into a noisy retractable dome - Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, Monday night - with a patchwork group that practiced together for the first time yesterday? Not so much, it seems. "These guys have all been there the whole time, all through camp," right guard Todd Herremans said, when asked whether the group would need to change or simplify anything for the two newcomers.
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