CollectionsWills
IN THE NEWS

Wills

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 20, 1991 | By Peter Finn, Special to The Inquirer
Eugene Feldman, the Camden County surrogate, was pacing the room and talking with a volubility that defied his subject: death and, more particularly, dying. "Modern technology has done tremendous things for us in keeping us alive," Feldman said. "But in some cases, it has done too good a job. People are tired of not dying. " A wave of assent, like revival amens, rippled from about 20 senior citizens who had gathered to listen to Feldman at the Brendenwood Retirement Community in Voorhees.
NEWS
October 21, 1987 | By Virginia M. Resnik, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteer firefighters in Camden County have the opportunity to have their wills drawn up by a lawyer free of charge under a new program offered through the Camden County Surrogate's Office. For the last two years, the office has run a program offering free wills to senior citizens, according to Gene Feldman, the county surrogate. Under that program, about 3,500 wills have been drawn up. Now, the will service is being offered to volunteer firefighters because they place their lives at risk for the sake of their communities without pay, Feldman said.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloucester County Surrogate Donald H. Wagner harshly criticized Freeholder Jay H. Sharp last night for suggesting that there may be improprieties in the program providing free wills for senior citizens. Sharp, a Republican seeking re-election, said last week that he was concerned about where the funds for the surrogate's program were kept and about the propriety of Wagner's selecting the lawyer to draw up the wills. "I am hurt and dismayed real deeply regarding some of the comments I've heard made," said Wagner, a Democrat also seeking re-election.
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
The daughter of a wealthy Phoenixville developer yesterday accused her younger brother of forging their parents' wills and cheating her out of her full inheritance. Anita Elizabeth Gerhold, 41, of Greenfield, Pa., testified in Chester County Court at the forgery trial of her brother Richard J. Puleo, 34, that their father, Joseph Puleo Sr., had property and other assets valued at more than $4.3 million. In a 1981 will signed by the father, Gerhold said that she, Richard Puleo and two older brothers were made co-executors and shared equally in the estate.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
James F. Proud, Delaware County's register of wills and a solicitor for several area towns, was nominated by Gov. Ridge yesterday to fill a county judgeship left vacant in April. The nomination of the 51-year-old Wallingford Republican is subject to confirmation by the Senate. It comes after five months of chatter in the Delaware County Courthouse about whom the governor would nominate. Proud, often touted as professional and hard-working, was long considered the top choice.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Phoenixville lawyer, charged with drawing up bogus wills for his parents to reduce his sister's inheritance, was acquitted of forgery and related offenses yesterday by a Chester County jury. Richard J. Puleo, 33, the youngest son of a wealthy Phoenixville developer, testified Wednesday that his father, Joseph A. Puleo Sr. and his mother, Lena Puleo, had given him power of attorney to handle their legal affairs. Richard Puleo said he believed that this authority made it legal for him to sign his parents' names to their wills.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Whoever thought that probating wills would be such an attractive job? As the primary nears in Gloucester County, it's the office of surrogate that is getting all of the attention - and is causing the most problems for both political parties. Neither party expected to have a primary contest, but when longtime political figure Donald Wagner announced early this year that he would be retiring from the Surrogate's Office, the field opened wide, prompting both parties to open their coffers and take sides.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The federal government may soon require hospitals and doctors to give patients information on living wills, documents that allow people to stipulate when they want life-support systems turned off. Critics say that the move would result in government-sanctioned mercy killings, but supporters say it would help prevent patients from being kept alive against their wishes. A provision in a deficit-cutting bill approved early Saturday by the Senate Finance Committee would require hospitals and doctors participating in the Medicare program to ask patients if they had signed a living will and to offer information about the wills to interested adults.
NEWS
July 12, 1991 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
It began in 1975, when Joe Quinlan walked into Paul Armstrong's office and told the lawyer he wanted help getting his daughter, Karen Ann, removed from a respirator. That desire, and the New Jersey Supreme Court decision that ultimately allowed it, prompted an international debate on the right to die and spawned the practice of people writing living wills in almost every state in the nation. Yesterday, New Jersey, where the debate began, became the 48th state to legally recognize living wills, the documents that allow people to say in advance what sort of care they want and who should make health-care decisions for them if they become incapacitated.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
January 22, 2015 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
North Philadelphia boxer Bryant Jennings, who balanced his craft with a full-time job until last summer, will get a crack at heavyweight king Wladimir Klitschko on April 25 at Madison Square Garden. Jennings, 30, said a date with Klitschko is the opportunity of a lifetime. He began boxing just six years ago and spent little time as an amateur. The former Ben Franklin High football player still trains under Fred Jenkins, the trainer who needled Jennings for two years to join the ABC Recreation Center at 26th and Master Streets.
SPORTS
January 21, 2015 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
MOBILE, Ala. - As the Eagles' "personnel executive" search continues, Chip Kelly will attend his first week of Senior Bowl practices as the team's de facto general manager. The Eagles' former GM, meanwhile, is not expected to be in attendance as practices begin on Tuesday. Howie Roseman will miss his first Senior Bowl in years, certainly since he became GM in 2010. Kelly, his assistant coaches and the Eagles' scouting staff will be here, however, as preparation for the draft begins in earnest.
SPORTS
January 20, 2015 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - The 76ers have another tough task. Two days removed from a 107-89 drubbing on the road by the Detroit Pistons, the Sixers have to face the Washington Wizards on Monday afternoon at the Verizon Center. On paper, this appears to be a tougher matchup for the young Sixers (8-32). At 28-13, the Wizards have the second-best record in the Eastern Conference. They have an NBA all-star in point guard John Wall. And they ranked fourth in assists (24.9 per game) and sixth in points allowed (97.4)
SPORTS
January 20, 2015 | By Aaron Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
Aaron McKie felt as if he had let Bill Ellerbee, his coach and mentor, down. The North Philadelphia native was a senior leader at Simon Gratz High and the Bulldogs were in Las Vegas for a holiday tournament. Ellerbee, who McKie said "raised" him since he was 5, had warned the team to get ample rest in preparation for games. "One night we got a chance to hang out a little bit and I overdid it, came in late," McKie recalled. "Not only did I come in late, I had the worst game of my life the next morning.
SPORTS
January 19, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
One way to measure Sam Jacobs' basketball career is by his own skilled and savvy work on the court. Another is by his uncanny ability to lead otherwise pedestrian programs to unprecedented heights. But perhaps the best is by the company he kept - especially among opponents. Jacobs, a former Cherry Hill West and Cornell University star, will be inducted into the South Jersey Basketball Hall of Fame on Feb. 15. It is a well-deserved recognition of a career marked by surprising team success as well as individual prowess.
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | the Inquirer Staff
"Remembering"? After the Whitney Houston biopic Whitney airs Saturday night on Lifetime, Bobby Brown: Remembering Whitney , will air, allowing Brown, with the exquisite sense of timing that has made him a household name, to dump more garbage on the memory of his onetime wife. "There was infidelity in the marriage, yes, on both parts," he says. "Both of us cheated on each other - period. So that's hard to swallow for both of us. " Theirs was one of the most celebrated, and longest-running, troubled marriages in pop history, from 1992 to 2007.
NEWS
January 17, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a frantic six-week fund-raising campaign, students and staff at St. Paul School breathed a huge sigh of relief Thursday. Faced with a do-or-die, they rallied to raise more than the $250,000 needed to save the parish school in Burlington City. Principal William Robbins called it a miracle. "We did it," Robbins said. "We raised a quarter of a million dollars. Who would have thought it?" Students and staff heard the news during morning prayer at the start of the school day. "They all gave a standing ovation and cheered," the principal said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Step into the tasty world of "Chocolate: The Exhibition" at the Academy of Natural Sciences through Jan. 24. Whether you're a chocolate novice or an informed enthusiast, you'll find you're learning things about this treat once deemed the food of the gods. The exhibition allows visitors to experience the chocolate craze of centuries past with activities such as the bartering of cacao seeds for goods in an Aztec market. Also explored are chocolate's origins and its journey across the Atlantic.
NEWS
January 15, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul Steinke, former general manager of the Reading Terminal Market, announced his bid Tuesday for an at-large City Council seat, calling himself a candidate with a track record of transforming the city for the better. Standing in front of the wide windows of a Center City bar across from the market he oversaw for 13 years, the Democrat said his life's work has been "creating growth and producing results. " "Our city deservedly is an international destination, known for its great history.
NEWS
January 15, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
After 27 years on Philadelphia City Council, Marian B. Tasco is calling it quits. The veteran politician will not seek reelection to her Ninth District seat, and instead said she would endorse a former aide, State Rep. Cherelle L. Parker (D., Phila.), to succeed her. Tasco, 77, said Tuesday that she had been thinking about retirement for a while, given her age and recent health issues. She said she was ready to take some time off and help a new generation of city leaders. "I've been working since I was 12 years old," she said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|