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Wills

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NEWS
February 20, 1991 | By Peter Finn, Special to The Inquirer
Eugene Feldman, the Camden County surrogate, was pacing the room and talking with a volubility that defied his subject: death and, more particularly, dying. "Modern technology has done tremendous things for us in keeping us alive," Feldman said. "But in some cases, it has done too good a job. People are tired of not dying. " A wave of assent, like revival amens, rippled from about 20 senior citizens who had gathered to listen to Feldman at the Brendenwood Retirement Community in Voorhees.
NEWS
October 21, 1987 | By Virginia M. Resnik, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteer firefighters in Camden County have the opportunity to have their wills drawn up by a lawyer free of charge under a new program offered through the Camden County Surrogate's Office. For the last two years, the office has run a program offering free wills to senior citizens, according to Gene Feldman, the county surrogate. Under that program, about 3,500 wills have been drawn up. Now, the will service is being offered to volunteer firefighters because they place their lives at risk for the sake of their communities without pay, Feldman said.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloucester County Surrogate Donald H. Wagner harshly criticized Freeholder Jay H. Sharp last night for suggesting that there may be improprieties in the program providing free wills for senior citizens. Sharp, a Republican seeking re-election, said last week that he was concerned about where the funds for the surrogate's program were kept and about the propriety of Wagner's selecting the lawyer to draw up the wills. "I am hurt and dismayed real deeply regarding some of the comments I've heard made," said Wagner, a Democrat also seeking re-election.
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
The daughter of a wealthy Phoenixville developer yesterday accused her younger brother of forging their parents' wills and cheating her out of her full inheritance. Anita Elizabeth Gerhold, 41, of Greenfield, Pa., testified in Chester County Court at the forgery trial of her brother Richard J. Puleo, 34, that their father, Joseph Puleo Sr., had property and other assets valued at more than $4.3 million. In a 1981 will signed by the father, Gerhold said that she, Richard Puleo and two older brothers were made co-executors and shared equally in the estate.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
James F. Proud, Delaware County's register of wills and a solicitor for several area towns, was nominated by Gov. Ridge yesterday to fill a county judgeship left vacant in April. The nomination of the 51-year-old Wallingford Republican is subject to confirmation by the Senate. It comes after five months of chatter in the Delaware County Courthouse about whom the governor would nominate. Proud, often touted as professional and hard-working, was long considered the top choice.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Phoenixville lawyer, charged with drawing up bogus wills for his parents to reduce his sister's inheritance, was acquitted of forgery and related offenses yesterday by a Chester County jury. Richard J. Puleo, 33, the youngest son of a wealthy Phoenixville developer, testified Wednesday that his father, Joseph A. Puleo Sr. and his mother, Lena Puleo, had given him power of attorney to handle their legal affairs. Richard Puleo said he believed that this authority made it legal for him to sign his parents' names to their wills.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Whoever thought that probating wills would be such an attractive job? As the primary nears in Gloucester County, it's the office of surrogate that is getting all of the attention - and is causing the most problems for both political parties. Neither party expected to have a primary contest, but when longtime political figure Donald Wagner announced early this year that he would be retiring from the Surrogate's Office, the field opened wide, prompting both parties to open their coffers and take sides.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The federal government may soon require hospitals and doctors to give patients information on living wills, documents that allow people to stipulate when they want life-support systems turned off. Critics say that the move would result in government-sanctioned mercy killings, but supporters say it would help prevent patients from being kept alive against their wishes. A provision in a deficit-cutting bill approved early Saturday by the Senate Finance Committee would require hospitals and doctors participating in the Medicare program to ask patients if they had signed a living will and to offer information about the wills to interested adults.
NEWS
July 12, 1991 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
It began in 1975, when Joe Quinlan walked into Paul Armstrong's office and told the lawyer he wanted help getting his daughter, Karen Ann, removed from a respirator. That desire, and the New Jersey Supreme Court decision that ultimately allowed it, prompted an international debate on the right to die and spawned the practice of people writing living wills in almost every state in the nation. Yesterday, New Jersey, where the debate began, became the 48th state to legally recognize living wills, the documents that allow people to say in advance what sort of care they want and who should make health-care decisions for them if they become incapacitated.
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NEWS
February 26, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
MANAYUNK will be mobbed by Mummers on Saturday when all 17 string bands march down Main Street in the first Philadelphia Mummers Mardi Gras Parade. Postponed last weekend by wintry weather, the free, family-friendly, two-hour parade from Shurs to Green lanes is scheduled to start at 10 a.m. under forecasted cold, sunny skies. The string bands will then serenade and schmooze with fans from noon to 4 p.m. in Manayunk restaurants. A $10 contribution to the cash-strapped Mummers buys a bracelet to all after-parties plus food and drink discounts.
SPORTS
February 24, 2015 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Freddy Galvis slightly pulled at the neck of his shirt yesterday morning to show off the battle scar of an athlete who already has put in his time before camp officially opens. Sunburn. The new Phillies shortstop arrived in Clearwater on Friday, when temperatures were hovering in the 30s. Galvis had spent the week fielding ground balls on an all-dirt baseball field in his hometown of Punto Fijo, Venezuela. "The field is like that," Galvis said, pointing to a bunch of rocks decorating the tunnel that leads to the Phillies' batting cages at Bright House Field.
NEWS
February 21, 2015 | By Amy Worden and Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - When the state Democratic Party holds its winter meeting this weekend, the primary agenda item is a routine one: picking candidates for the Pennsylvania Supreme Court and other judicial races. But roiling below the surface is a widening rift that is raising questions about - and possible challenges to - the leadership of the party, as well as its relevance and role in the high-stakes races in 2016. At the same time Democrats are celebrating a historic victory in the 2014 governor's race, they convene in Hershey on Friday with the GOP holding a record majority in the state House, two people who had been bright stars of the party in legal trouble, and talk of pushing out party chairman Jim Burn.
NEWS
February 21, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - They gave up their city cars. Or, in the words of city resident Frank "@JitneyGuy" Becktel, "HOLY C--- THEY'RE GIVING UP THEIR CARS. " Yes, the City Council of Atlantic City did what many in this turbulence-struck seaside town thought would never happen - they relinquished full-time use of city-funded cars. With Atlantic City in the dual grip of a fiscal meltdown and multiple emergency state overseers, City Council members said the time had come to park the cars back on the lot. "We're not in La-La land," said Council President Frank M. Gilliam Jr. He said the move was symbolic and wouldn't save much money.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
A coalition of civil liberties and antidiscrimination groups has joined with prosecutors, police, medical professionals, and political activists to launch a campaign to make New Jersey the next state in the nation to legalize marijuana. Under the name New Jersey United for Marijuana Reform, the coalition includes the state chapters of the ACLU and the NAACP; Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, and the president of the state Municipal Prosecutors Association, which last year voted in favor of legalization for adults.
NEWS
February 19, 2015 | Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Republican Party, after months of trying to recruit a high-profile candidate for mayor, must now decide whether to endorse one of four virtually unknown contenders. Republican committeeman Elmer Money and businesswoman Melissa Murray Bailey pitched themselves to party ward leaders Tuesday night at a meeting. So did lawyer Rhashea Harmon, 38, who ran for state Senate in 2010, and Sean Clark, 35, who is vice president of a nonprofit called the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education.
NEWS
February 18, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Kathy Anne English grew up inspired by the wildlife, landscapes, and people of the Pinelands. "I paint what I'm passionate about. I paint where I am," says the prolific watercolorist, who lives in a woodsy, light-filled home in Mullica Township, Atlantic County. For English, creating a 10th-anniversary poster for Lines on the Pines, a lively annual gathering of authors, artists, musicians, and craftspeople, was a natural. After all, they, too, are inspired by the 1.1 million-acre national reserve, a unique, fragile, and storied landscape that comprises nearly a quarter of the Garden State.
SPORTS
February 18, 2015 | By Ryan Lawrence, Daily News Columnist
FOUR YEARS AGO, Chase Utley was the only player on the short field that sits on the left side of the front entrance to Bright House Field. He was fielding ground balls. It doesn't sound like anything unordinary until you add in the fact that Utley was going through the routine while seated on a bucket due to a chronic knee ailment. A year later, Utley would be joined by Ryan Howard on the spring sideline following Achillies' surgery. The two biggest pieces in the Phillies' lineup were dealing with career-altering injuries and their readiness for the 2012 season was in question throughout the team's stay in Clearwater, Fla. The summer that followed turned into the beginning of the end of the greatest era in Phillies history.
SPORTS
February 15, 2015 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
Those who run together stay together, so the saying goes. This year, single runners may meet that way, too. That's the theory behind three events put on by local running stores timed to the Valentine's Day Holiday. "A lot of people run. A lot of people are single. Why not merge the people looking and have them all run together?" asked Liz Pagonis, outreach director for Philly Runner. In Haddonfield on Thursday, runners joined in a new event called the "Running To or From Love Run," an untimed, three-mile run starting and ending at the Haddonfield Running Co.'s downtown store.
SPORTS
February 14, 2015 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Another provision of the sanctions assessed against Penn State as a result of the Jerry Sandusky child sex-abuse scandal has been reversed with the announcement Thursday that the university once again will receive its full share of bowl revenues from the Big Ten Conference beginning with the 2015 season. In a statement, the Big Ten said its council of presidents and chancellors decided at a meeting Wednesday to restore the bowl revenue, saying that "the original bowl fine was based on NCAA actions, most of which have been rescinded over the past six months.
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