CollectionsWills
IN THE NEWS

Wills

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 20, 1991 | By Peter Finn, Special to The Inquirer
Eugene Feldman, the Camden County surrogate, was pacing the room and talking with a volubility that defied his subject: death and, more particularly, dying. "Modern technology has done tremendous things for us in keeping us alive," Feldman said. "But in some cases, it has done too good a job. People are tired of not dying. " A wave of assent, like revival amens, rippled from about 20 senior citizens who had gathered to listen to Feldman at the Brendenwood Retirement Community in Voorhees.
NEWS
October 21, 1987 | By Virginia M. Resnik, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteer firefighters in Camden County have the opportunity to have their wills drawn up by a lawyer free of charge under a new program offered through the Camden County Surrogate's Office. For the last two years, the office has run a program offering free wills to senior citizens, according to Gene Feldman, the county surrogate. Under that program, about 3,500 wills have been drawn up. Now, the will service is being offered to volunteer firefighters because they place their lives at risk for the sake of their communities without pay, Feldman said.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloucester County Surrogate Donald H. Wagner harshly criticized Freeholder Jay H. Sharp last night for suggesting that there may be improprieties in the program providing free wills for senior citizens. Sharp, a Republican seeking re-election, said last week that he was concerned about where the funds for the surrogate's program were kept and about the propriety of Wagner's selecting the lawyer to draw up the wills. "I am hurt and dismayed real deeply regarding some of the comments I've heard made," said Wagner, a Democrat also seeking re-election.
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
The daughter of a wealthy Phoenixville developer yesterday accused her younger brother of forging their parents' wills and cheating her out of her full inheritance. Anita Elizabeth Gerhold, 41, of Greenfield, Pa., testified in Chester County Court at the forgery trial of her brother Richard J. Puleo, 34, that their father, Joseph Puleo Sr., had property and other assets valued at more than $4.3 million. In a 1981 will signed by the father, Gerhold said that she, Richard Puleo and two older brothers were made co-executors and shared equally in the estate.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
James F. Proud, Delaware County's register of wills and a solicitor for several area towns, was nominated by Gov. Ridge yesterday to fill a county judgeship left vacant in April. The nomination of the 51-year-old Wallingford Republican is subject to confirmation by the Senate. It comes after five months of chatter in the Delaware County Courthouse about whom the governor would nominate. Proud, often touted as professional and hard-working, was long considered the top choice.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Phoenixville lawyer, charged with drawing up bogus wills for his parents to reduce his sister's inheritance, was acquitted of forgery and related offenses yesterday by a Chester County jury. Richard J. Puleo, 33, the youngest son of a wealthy Phoenixville developer, testified Wednesday that his father, Joseph A. Puleo Sr. and his mother, Lena Puleo, had given him power of attorney to handle their legal affairs. Richard Puleo said he believed that this authority made it legal for him to sign his parents' names to their wills.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Whoever thought that probating wills would be such an attractive job? As the primary nears in Gloucester County, it's the office of surrogate that is getting all of the attention - and is causing the most problems for both political parties. Neither party expected to have a primary contest, but when longtime political figure Donald Wagner announced early this year that he would be retiring from the Surrogate's Office, the field opened wide, prompting both parties to open their coffers and take sides.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The federal government may soon require hospitals and doctors to give patients information on living wills, documents that allow people to stipulate when they want life-support systems turned off. Critics say that the move would result in government-sanctioned mercy killings, but supporters say it would help prevent patients from being kept alive against their wishes. A provision in a deficit-cutting bill approved early Saturday by the Senate Finance Committee would require hospitals and doctors participating in the Medicare program to ask patients if they had signed a living will and to offer information about the wills to interested adults.
NEWS
July 12, 1991 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
It began in 1975, when Joe Quinlan walked into Paul Armstrong's office and told the lawyer he wanted help getting his daughter, Karen Ann, removed from a respirator. That desire, and the New Jersey Supreme Court decision that ultimately allowed it, prompted an international debate on the right to die and spawned the practice of people writing living wills in almost every state in the nation. Yesterday, New Jersey, where the debate began, became the 48th state to legally recognize living wills, the documents that allow people to say in advance what sort of care they want and who should make health-care decisions for them if they become incapacitated.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
August 26, 2014 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
In any discussion of Christian Hackenberg - his personality, his skills as a quarterback, his future at Penn State and beyond - Micky Sullivan acknowledges his prejudice at the start. If there's a benefit of the doubt to be given, Sullivan is going to give it to Hackenberg, and he makes no apologies for it. He coached Hackenberg at Fork Union Military Academy in Virginia. He plays golf with him in the spring and summer. He traveled down to St. Petersburg, Fla., in January 2013 when Hackenberg played in the Under Armour All-American Game.
NEWS
August 25, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
THE SALE of William Penn High School will proceed as planned. A community coalition announced yesterday that it has dropped its legal action opposing the sale of the sprawling North Philadelphia campus, days after the state Supreme Court denied a request for a preliminary injunction. "We fought the good fight," Inez Henderson-Purnell, president of the William Penn Development Coalition, said in a statement released by the group. In June, the School Reform Commission approved the sale of the property to Temple University for $15 million.
NEWS
August 25, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
How do you deal with a hideous terrorist group that has morphed into a Mideast state with a huge war chest and an aggressive army - and beheads an American journalist? Since the gruesome slaughter of James Foley, U.S. officials are debating whether the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) can be contained or must be rolled back in the near term. President Obama appears wedded to a strategy of containment - so far. But I've been struck by the intensity with which current and former government and military officials have described the threats posed to core U.S. interests by ISIS.
SPORTS
August 22, 2014 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
A.J. BURNETT'S answer wasn't definitive, but it did reinforce the widely held belief that the veteran pitcher would lean toward retirement when the 2014 season ends. After taking the mound for his 27th start of the season on Tuesday night, Burnett earned himself a half-million dollars (a performance bonus in his contract) and set himself up to make $1.5 million more for next year, too. Burnett's player option for the 2015 season can increase twice more this season if and when he reaches 30 and 32 starts on the season.
SPORTS
August 21, 2014 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
It has been a long time on the comeback trail for distance runner and two-time Olympian Kara Goucher, who has struggled with injuries for much of the last two years and has not raced in about 14 months. But Goucher, 36, says she's "finally healthy and have been for a few months now," and will return to competition Sept. 21 in the Rock 'n' Roll Philadelphia Half-Marathon along the streets of Center City. Race officials announced Tuesday the addition of Goucher and Deena Kastor, the U.S. record holder for the women's marathon and half-marathon, to the field for the 13.1-mile race which features more than a dozen bands at 14 entertainment stages along the course.
NEWS
August 20, 2014
NOW THAT the fundraising gimmick for Lou Gehrig's disease involving people dumping ice water on their heads has gone viral, similar causes around the country are wondering how they can capitalize on the idea for their own benefit. Frankly, we are not big fans of the "ice bucket challenge" that comprised about 80 percent of our Facebook feed this weekend. The idea works like this: Someone challenges you, you have the option of pouring a bucket of ice water over your head or writing a $100 check to the ALS Association.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
MAYBE WE can put this angry summer behind us. We have the Taney Dragons. We also have a shirtless Will Smith riding the pony as he sang "Jump on It" in Las Vegas. TMZ.com reports that Will showed up unannounced at the Palms on Friday to support his son Trey , who was DJing with some Philly fella named Jazzy Jeff . Only because it's Will and Jazzy Jeff and because this summer needs some "Summertime," the link is: ph.ly/WillSmith. * Now that we're getting our happiness groove back, let's keep it going: On Oct. 27 comes the new Taylor Swift album.
SPORTS
August 19, 2014 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
SOUTH WILLIAMSPORT, Pa. - Taney manager Alex Rice - as well as almost every other manager at the Little League World Series - has made a habit of not announcing who his starting pitcher will be until he hands in the lineup card a few hours before a game. Rice has left his hints, if one listens closely or watches how the team practices. But he never fully confirms his decision. The manager continued his tradition on Sunday night after the Dragons rallied past Pearland, Texas, 7-6, in the second round at Lamade Stadium.
NEWS
August 19, 2014
NEVER TRUST a skinny chef. Nor one with a spotless apron. I trust Walter Staib, built like a Black Forest barrel with a winter-frost Vandyke. In a world crawling with skinny chefs, Iron Chefs and nuisance chefs, give me Walter. "I don't have tattoos, I haven't been in jail, I'm an ordinary guy," he says. This ordinary guy has published six cookbooks, his PBS "A Taste of History" series snagged four Emmys in five seasons, he's a mega-consultant who has launched 650 restaurants around the globe.
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
A seminar that teaches attendees how to grow their own marijuana is coming next weekend to Atlantic City, a town that has broken ground before by dabbling in vices. The course offering will be a first on the East Coast, said Dale Sky Jones, chancellor of Oaksterdam University, an Oakland, Calif., marijuana school that has graduated 18,000 students since its 2007 opening. Never mind that planting your own weed is illegal in the Garden State. And that Gov. Christie has vowed that he will not allow New Jersey to "turn into California" and that he will not waver from the strict, dispensary-only medical-marijuana model.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|