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Wills

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NEWS
February 20, 1991 | By Peter Finn, Special to The Inquirer
Eugene Feldman, the Camden County surrogate, was pacing the room and talking with a volubility that defied his subject: death and, more particularly, dying. "Modern technology has done tremendous things for us in keeping us alive," Feldman said. "But in some cases, it has done too good a job. People are tired of not dying. " A wave of assent, like revival amens, rippled from about 20 senior citizens who had gathered to listen to Feldman at the Brendenwood Retirement Community in Voorhees.
NEWS
October 21, 1987 | By Virginia M. Resnik, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteer firefighters in Camden County have the opportunity to have their wills drawn up by a lawyer free of charge under a new program offered through the Camden County Surrogate's Office. For the last two years, the office has run a program offering free wills to senior citizens, according to Gene Feldman, the county surrogate. Under that program, about 3,500 wills have been drawn up. Now, the will service is being offered to volunteer firefighters because they place their lives at risk for the sake of their communities without pay, Feldman said.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloucester County Surrogate Donald H. Wagner harshly criticized Freeholder Jay H. Sharp last night for suggesting that there may be improprieties in the program providing free wills for senior citizens. Sharp, a Republican seeking re-election, said last week that he was concerned about where the funds for the surrogate's program were kept and about the propriety of Wagner's selecting the lawyer to draw up the wills. "I am hurt and dismayed real deeply regarding some of the comments I've heard made," said Wagner, a Democrat also seeking re-election.
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
The daughter of a wealthy Phoenixville developer yesterday accused her younger brother of forging their parents' wills and cheating her out of her full inheritance. Anita Elizabeth Gerhold, 41, of Greenfield, Pa., testified in Chester County Court at the forgery trial of her brother Richard J. Puleo, 34, that their father, Joseph Puleo Sr., had property and other assets valued at more than $4.3 million. In a 1981 will signed by the father, Gerhold said that she, Richard Puleo and two older brothers were made co-executors and shared equally in the estate.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
James F. Proud, Delaware County's register of wills and a solicitor for several area towns, was nominated by Gov. Ridge yesterday to fill a county judgeship left vacant in April. The nomination of the 51-year-old Wallingford Republican is subject to confirmation by the Senate. It comes after five months of chatter in the Delaware County Courthouse about whom the governor would nominate. Proud, often touted as professional and hard-working, was long considered the top choice.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Phoenixville lawyer, charged with drawing up bogus wills for his parents to reduce his sister's inheritance, was acquitted of forgery and related offenses yesterday by a Chester County jury. Richard J. Puleo, 33, the youngest son of a wealthy Phoenixville developer, testified Wednesday that his father, Joseph A. Puleo Sr. and his mother, Lena Puleo, had given him power of attorney to handle their legal affairs. Richard Puleo said he believed that this authority made it legal for him to sign his parents' names to their wills.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Whoever thought that probating wills would be such an attractive job? As the primary nears in Gloucester County, it's the office of surrogate that is getting all of the attention - and is causing the most problems for both political parties. Neither party expected to have a primary contest, but when longtime political figure Donald Wagner announced early this year that he would be retiring from the Surrogate's Office, the field opened wide, prompting both parties to open their coffers and take sides.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The federal government may soon require hospitals and doctors to give patients information on living wills, documents that allow people to stipulate when they want life-support systems turned off. Critics say that the move would result in government-sanctioned mercy killings, but supporters say it would help prevent patients from being kept alive against their wishes. A provision in a deficit-cutting bill approved early Saturday by the Senate Finance Committee would require hospitals and doctors participating in the Medicare program to ask patients if they had signed a living will and to offer information about the wills to interested adults.
NEWS
July 12, 1991 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
It began in 1975, when Joe Quinlan walked into Paul Armstrong's office and told the lawyer he wanted help getting his daughter, Karen Ann, removed from a respirator. That desire, and the New Jersey Supreme Court decision that ultimately allowed it, prompted an international debate on the right to die and spawned the practice of people writing living wills in almost every state in the nation. Yesterday, New Jersey, where the debate began, became the 48th state to legally recognize living wills, the documents that allow people to say in advance what sort of care they want and who should make health-care decisions for them if they become incapacitated.
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SPORTS
June 25, 2015 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Danny Garcia contends that less of him left more to be desired, particularly when it came to punching power. That's why Garcia said he's moving up and leaving one of his titles in the 140-pound weight class behind to make his welterweight debut on Aug. 1 against former two-time world champion Paulie Malignaggi at Brooklyn's Barclays Center. "For the first time in a long time, I can worry about training to get better and not training to lose weight," Garcia, the super-lightweight champ who has struggled to make weight, said Tuesday during a teleconference.
SPORTS
June 25, 2015 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 76ers are all about the long-term plan. The team is looking to draft someone with NBA all-star potential to be a cornerstone for seasons to come. On paper, former Ohio State guard D'Angelo Russell appears to be the best fit. Yet some believe that Latvian power forward Kristaps Porzingis could develop into the head of the draft class five seasons from now. What about taking former Duke center Jahlil Okafor if he's still on the board when the Sixers select third overall Thursday night at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn?
SPORTS
June 24, 2015 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
As expected, Dario Saric has decided to remain with Anadolu Efes of the Turkish Basketball League for at least another season. The 76ers were negotiating with Anadolu Efes to bring the forward to the NBA next season. But Saric's agent, Jeff Schwartz, told ESPN that his client won't play for the Sixers during the 2015-16 season. The Sixers acquired Saric's rights last year at the NBA draft. They traded their first-round pick, Elfrid Payton (10th overall), to the Orlando Magic for Saric, who was selected 12th, plus a 2017 top-11-protected pick and a 2015 second-rounder.
SPORTS
June 24, 2015 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 76ers have said they'll select the best available player Thursday with the third overall pick in the NBA draft. As a result, their selection could be determined by the players that the Minnesota Timberwolves and Los Angeles Lakers pick ahead of them. The Timberwolves have told Kentucky power forward/center Karl-Anthony Towns they'll select him with the first overall pick, according to the New York website SNY.tv. After that, things are unclear. For weeks, the popular belief was that the Lakers would pick Duke center Jahlil Okafor at No. 2 if Towns wasn't available.
SPORTS
June 24, 2015 | By Laine Higgins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Surrounded by a verdant canopy of trees, the Fairmount Park Horticulture Center sits about 500 meters behind the finish line of the Philadelphia TriRock Triathlon on Martin Luther King Drive. To the majority of the field, the building is little more than another landmark along the historic course. But to Katherine Rosenberg, 34, and John Stolz, 39, the building is a little more important: It will host their wedding just over eight hours after the duo competes in the sprint distance triathlon race on Saturday.
SPORTS
June 23, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
It was the top of the second inning and there was cheering in the press box. Pat Gillick, the president of the worst team in baseball, had just watched Phillies third baseman Maikel Franco, second baseman Cesar Hernandez and catcher Cameron Rupp team up for an unconventional double play that cut down a St. Louis Cardinals base runner at home. "Hell of a play," Gillick said as he stood and clapped during a conversation with a reporter. When the Phillies used four hits, including a couple of doubles, to score three times in the bottom of the second inning off Cardinals ace Michael Wacha, Gillick's emotions surfaced again.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
After countless hours of courtroom argument, dozens of briefs, and seemingly endless legal maneuvering, the fate of President Obama's Affordable Care Act comes down to the meaning of six simple words. On June 28, 2012, when the U.S. Supreme Court first narrowly upheld the law, it seemed the bitter struggle over Obama's huge expansion of federally funded health care had come to an end. But the calm was short-lived. Within a few months, conservative legal theorists seized on a little-noticed sentence in the law that seemed to limit federal assistance for consumers to buy health insurance purchased on state-established exchanges, or marketplaces.
NEWS
June 22, 2015
*  TRUE DETECTIVE . 9 p.m. Sunday, HBO. Temper your expectations for the show's new season, which carries nearly as much baggage as its characters. Sunday's Season 2 premiere introduces Colin Farrell, Vince Vaughn, Rachel McAdams and Taylor Kitsch as four people whose complicated lives won't be simplified by the murder of a corrupt southern California city's manager. Philly's David Morse guest stars. *  A DEADLY ADOPTION . 8 p.m. Saturday, Lifetime. Are Kristen Wiig and Will Ferrell (pictured)
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Somewhere in a remote part of Canada, antennae are likely picking up the signals of 100 shorebirds that just weeks ago were on the beaches of Delaware Bay, where they were caught with giant nets and fitted with tiny transmitters. The birds are robin-size creatures called red knots. After precipitous declines in their population on the bay - from about 100,000 birds in the 1990s to about 12,000 a few years ago - federal officials designated them as threatened in December. Researchers know that red knots have one of the longest migrations on the planet - from the tip of South America to their breeding grounds in the Arctic.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | By Chuck Darrow, Daily News Columnist
AT THIS POINT, the idea of a bricks-and-mortar shrine to Philadelphia's rich, diverse and influential musical history seems almost as old as the city itself. But a group that includes some of Our Town's most revered musical monikers has started the ball rolling toward making the dream reality. According to George Pettignano, a New York-based CBS-TV executive who is spearheading the drive to create the facility, those behind what is being referred to as the Philadelphia Music Museum & Hall of Fame are eyeing the financially beleaguered Suzanne Roberts Theatre at Broad and Lombard streets.
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