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NEWS
February 20, 1991 | By Peter Finn, Special to The Inquirer
Eugene Feldman, the Camden County surrogate, was pacing the room and talking with a volubility that defied his subject: death and, more particularly, dying. "Modern technology has done tremendous things for us in keeping us alive," Feldman said. "But in some cases, it has done too good a job. People are tired of not dying. " A wave of assent, like revival amens, rippled from about 20 senior citizens who had gathered to listen to Feldman at the Brendenwood Retirement Community in Voorhees.
NEWS
October 21, 1987 | By Virginia M. Resnik, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteer firefighters in Camden County have the opportunity to have their wills drawn up by a lawyer free of charge under a new program offered through the Camden County Surrogate's Office. For the last two years, the office has run a program offering free wills to senior citizens, according to Gene Feldman, the county surrogate. Under that program, about 3,500 wills have been drawn up. Now, the will service is being offered to volunteer firefighters because they place their lives at risk for the sake of their communities without pay, Feldman said.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloucester County Surrogate Donald H. Wagner harshly criticized Freeholder Jay H. Sharp last night for suggesting that there may be improprieties in the program providing free wills for senior citizens. Sharp, a Republican seeking re-election, said last week that he was concerned about where the funds for the surrogate's program were kept and about the propriety of Wagner's selecting the lawyer to draw up the wills. "I am hurt and dismayed real deeply regarding some of the comments I've heard made," said Wagner, a Democrat also seeking re-election.
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
The daughter of a wealthy Phoenixville developer yesterday accused her younger brother of forging their parents' wills and cheating her out of her full inheritance. Anita Elizabeth Gerhold, 41, of Greenfield, Pa., testified in Chester County Court at the forgery trial of her brother Richard J. Puleo, 34, that their father, Joseph Puleo Sr., had property and other assets valued at more than $4.3 million. In a 1981 will signed by the father, Gerhold said that she, Richard Puleo and two older brothers were made co-executors and shared equally in the estate.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
James F. Proud, Delaware County's register of wills and a solicitor for several area towns, was nominated by Gov. Ridge yesterday to fill a county judgeship left vacant in April. The nomination of the 51-year-old Wallingford Republican is subject to confirmation by the Senate. It comes after five months of chatter in the Delaware County Courthouse about whom the governor would nominate. Proud, often touted as professional and hard-working, was long considered the top choice.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Phoenixville lawyer, charged with drawing up bogus wills for his parents to reduce his sister's inheritance, was acquitted of forgery and related offenses yesterday by a Chester County jury. Richard J. Puleo, 33, the youngest son of a wealthy Phoenixville developer, testified Wednesday that his father, Joseph A. Puleo Sr. and his mother, Lena Puleo, had given him power of attorney to handle their legal affairs. Richard Puleo said he believed that this authority made it legal for him to sign his parents' names to their wills.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Whoever thought that probating wills would be such an attractive job? As the primary nears in Gloucester County, it's the office of surrogate that is getting all of the attention - and is causing the most problems for both political parties. Neither party expected to have a primary contest, but when longtime political figure Donald Wagner announced early this year that he would be retiring from the Surrogate's Office, the field opened wide, prompting both parties to open their coffers and take sides.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The federal government may soon require hospitals and doctors to give patients information on living wills, documents that allow people to stipulate when they want life-support systems turned off. Critics say that the move would result in government-sanctioned mercy killings, but supporters say it would help prevent patients from being kept alive against their wishes. A provision in a deficit-cutting bill approved early Saturday by the Senate Finance Committee would require hospitals and doctors participating in the Medicare program to ask patients if they had signed a living will and to offer information about the wills to interested adults.
NEWS
July 12, 1991 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
It began in 1975, when Joe Quinlan walked into Paul Armstrong's office and told the lawyer he wanted help getting his daughter, Karen Ann, removed from a respirator. That desire, and the New Jersey Supreme Court decision that ultimately allowed it, prompted an international debate on the right to die and spawned the practice of people writing living wills in almost every state in the nation. Yesterday, New Jersey, where the debate began, became the 48th state to legally recognize living wills, the documents that allow people to say in advance what sort of care they want and who should make health-care decisions for them if they become incapacitated.
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SPORTS
April 18, 2014 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
THADDEUS YOUNG has always known how to keep his head down, play hard, say all the right things and let the chips fall where they may. That was then, though. Times could be changing for the 6-9 forward, who just completed his seventh season with the 76ers. He's never been a "what about me" type of person, but the business side of the sport could very well have the 25-year-old veteran thinking about his future. He is due to make $9.16 million next season, then has a player option of $9.7 million.
SPORTS
April 17, 2014
Penn State's home football game against Ohio State on Oct. 25 will kick off at 8 p.m., the Nittany Lions said Tuesday. For the second straight year, Penn State will clash with Michigan and Ohio State in prime time. The Lions will visit Michigan on Oct. 11 at 7 p.m.
SPORTS
April 17, 2014 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
DEPENDING ON how you interpret the tone of general manager Paul Holmgren and coach Craig Berube, goaltender Steve Mason might not be ready for Game 1 of the Flyers' first-round series with the Rangers tomorrow night at Madison Square Garden. Either that, or the Flyers prefer to keep their opponent guessing with gamesmanship. Mason practiced for nearly 20 minutes yesterday before a planned exit from the ice whisked him into video review and meetings. Holmgren said Mason, still suffering from the ill effects of a collision with Jayson Megna in Pittsburgh on Saturday, was out of the training facility a short time later and "receiving treatment.
SPORTS
April 16, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kimmo Timonen had just finished an interview with a Finnish television crew last week and was in a pensive but happy mood. The Flyers' sturdy little defenseman was asked if it gave him more motivation to play in the Stanley Cup playoffs because he may retire after they end. "It does," he said. "But I haven't decided anything yet. I want to play these playoffs and see how I feel. I just want to put that decision behind me and focus on the games we have here. " Starting Thursday in New York, the Flyers face the Rangers in an intriguing opening-round series.
SPORTS
April 16, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Flyers are cautiously optimistic that goalie Steve Mason will play in the playoff opener Thursday night against the New York Rangers. "I feel he will," general manager Paul Holmgren said Monday afternoon, "but you never know. We'll see how he feels in the morning" Tuesday. Mason was hurt in Pittsburgh on Saturday. The Penguins' Jayson Megna knocked Flyers defenseman Andrew MacDonald into the 6-foot-4 goalie, snapping his head and neck back before he fell to the ice. Mason remained in the game for the final 3 minutes, 33 seconds of the second period before he was replaced by Ray Emery.
SPORTS
April 15, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
If the regular season is a barometer, the Flyers and New York Rangers will have a tight-checking, low-scoring series when they meet in the opening round of the Stanley Cup playoffs. The Amtrak series starts with games Thursday and Easter Sunday in New York. The Rangers have the stronger defense, the Flyers have the better attack. "We don't have to worry as much about them as ourselves," Flyers winger Matt Read said after scoring his 22d goal in a season-ending 6-5 shootout loss to Carolina on Sunday.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
A WHOLE LOTTA fuss over nothing - that's what Mayor Nutter is calling reaction to a memo sent by City Council President Darrell Clarke to all Council members Wednesday, which prompted Council to stall a bill advancing the sale of PGW. Nutter wants to get the ball rolling, but Clarke's memo raised questions about whether the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission's review process of the proposed sale of PGW to UIL Holdings Corp. would give Council enough time to have its say. Nutter said that even a favorable decision from the commission would be meaningless without Council's approval of the sale ordinance.
SPORTS
April 14, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
PITTSBURGH - In the postgame showers, Hal Gill, the hulking Flyers defenseman who played Saturday for the first time since Dec. 21, was singing "New York, New York. " The Flyers are headed to Broadway. Continuing their uncanny dominance in Pittsburgh, the Flyers scored a wild, 4-3 overtime win over the Penguins at the Consol Energy Center on Saturday afternoon, ensuring that they will face the New York Rangers in the playoffs. But the victory, which clinched third place in the Metropolitan Division, was tempered by an injury to goalie Steve Mason, who left the game after the second period with what the Flyers called an upper-body injury.
NEWS
April 13, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Let's cut to the big question: Should I change all my passwords? Answer: Yes, but not right this moment. Millions of people are asking the italicized question above. Why? Because a terrible thing has been happening to the Web, for two years, without detection, and it affects most people who use it. It's called the Heartbleed Bug. Its discovery was announced Monday, jointly, by folks at Google and those at a Finnish company called Codenomicon. We will explain the name below, but focus for now on the Bug. Many of the major servers and websites on the Internet - meaning "most of the ones you use" - depend on a protocol that protects information.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
  Why wait? If you're the group that oversees the Philadelphia Film Festival, the annual fall movie marathon, and you've Kickstarted and fundraised, restored and retrofitted an old Center City moviehouse, why not throw a festival there whenever you want? Why just October? No reason. And so, to show off the Roxy Theater near Rittenhouse Square, and bring to town top-tier titles whose release schedules don't jibe with the main fall program, the Philadelphia Film Society offers its first Spring Showcase - 25 films in seven days.
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