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Wills

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NEWS
February 20, 1991 | By Peter Finn, Special to The Inquirer
Eugene Feldman, the Camden County surrogate, was pacing the room and talking with a volubility that defied his subject: death and, more particularly, dying. "Modern technology has done tremendous things for us in keeping us alive," Feldman said. "But in some cases, it has done too good a job. People are tired of not dying. " A wave of assent, like revival amens, rippled from about 20 senior citizens who had gathered to listen to Feldman at the Brendenwood Retirement Community in Voorhees.
NEWS
October 21, 1987 | By Virginia M. Resnik, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteer firefighters in Camden County have the opportunity to have their wills drawn up by a lawyer free of charge under a new program offered through the Camden County Surrogate's Office. For the last two years, the office has run a program offering free wills to senior citizens, according to Gene Feldman, the county surrogate. Under that program, about 3,500 wills have been drawn up. Now, the will service is being offered to volunteer firefighters because they place their lives at risk for the sake of their communities without pay, Feldman said.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloucester County Surrogate Donald H. Wagner harshly criticized Freeholder Jay H. Sharp last night for suggesting that there may be improprieties in the program providing free wills for senior citizens. Sharp, a Republican seeking re-election, said last week that he was concerned about where the funds for the surrogate's program were kept and about the propriety of Wagner's selecting the lawyer to draw up the wills. "I am hurt and dismayed real deeply regarding some of the comments I've heard made," said Wagner, a Democrat also seeking re-election.
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
The daughter of a wealthy Phoenixville developer yesterday accused her younger brother of forging their parents' wills and cheating her out of her full inheritance. Anita Elizabeth Gerhold, 41, of Greenfield, Pa., testified in Chester County Court at the forgery trial of her brother Richard J. Puleo, 34, that their father, Joseph Puleo Sr., had property and other assets valued at more than $4.3 million. In a 1981 will signed by the father, Gerhold said that she, Richard Puleo and two older brothers were made co-executors and shared equally in the estate.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
James F. Proud, Delaware County's register of wills and a solicitor for several area towns, was nominated by Gov. Ridge yesterday to fill a county judgeship left vacant in April. The nomination of the 51-year-old Wallingford Republican is subject to confirmation by the Senate. It comes after five months of chatter in the Delaware County Courthouse about whom the governor would nominate. Proud, often touted as professional and hard-working, was long considered the top choice.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Phoenixville lawyer, charged with drawing up bogus wills for his parents to reduce his sister's inheritance, was acquitted of forgery and related offenses yesterday by a Chester County jury. Richard J. Puleo, 33, the youngest son of a wealthy Phoenixville developer, testified Wednesday that his father, Joseph A. Puleo Sr. and his mother, Lena Puleo, had given him power of attorney to handle their legal affairs. Richard Puleo said he believed that this authority made it legal for him to sign his parents' names to their wills.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Whoever thought that probating wills would be such an attractive job? As the primary nears in Gloucester County, it's the office of surrogate that is getting all of the attention - and is causing the most problems for both political parties. Neither party expected to have a primary contest, but when longtime political figure Donald Wagner announced early this year that he would be retiring from the Surrogate's Office, the field opened wide, prompting both parties to open their coffers and take sides.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The federal government may soon require hospitals and doctors to give patients information on living wills, documents that allow people to stipulate when they want life-support systems turned off. Critics say that the move would result in government-sanctioned mercy killings, but supporters say it would help prevent patients from being kept alive against their wishes. A provision in a deficit-cutting bill approved early Saturday by the Senate Finance Committee would require hospitals and doctors participating in the Medicare program to ask patients if they had signed a living will and to offer information about the wills to interested adults.
NEWS
July 12, 1991 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
It began in 1975, when Joe Quinlan walked into Paul Armstrong's office and told the lawyer he wanted help getting his daughter, Karen Ann, removed from a respirator. That desire, and the New Jersey Supreme Court decision that ultimately allowed it, prompted an international debate on the right to die and spawned the practice of people writing living wills in almost every state in the nation. Yesterday, New Jersey, where the debate began, became the 48th state to legally recognize living wills, the documents that allow people to say in advance what sort of care they want and who should make health-care decisions for them if they become incapacitated.
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BUSINESS
December 12, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Airlines are enjoying record profits as oil prices drop and the global economy improves. So far, though, airlines have not passed on their profits to passengers in the form of lower airfares. But that may change. The fall in fuel prices and upturn in the economy could benefit consumers with cheaper travel, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) in Geneva said Wednesday. The trade group for the world's airlines predicted the average fare could drop 5.1 percent in 2015, excluding taxes and surcharges.
SPORTS
December 10, 2014 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Villanova enjoyed success two weeks ago competing against and defeating a pair of ranked teams in Brooklyn. Now the seventh-ranked Wildcats head to Manhattan and Madison Square Garden for another showcase matchup, this one in Tuesday night's Jimmy V Classic against Illinois. The Fighting Illini were ranked 24th last week before a loss to Miami knocked them out of the top 25. "This is going to be a hell of a game," 'Nova coach Jay Wright said. "You love these games at this time of year.
SPORTS
December 9, 2014 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Reuniting with an old Eastern rival, Penn State has accepted an invitation to play Boston College in the Pinstripe Bowl on Dec. 27 at Yankee Stadium at 4:30 p.m. on ESPN. The Nittany Lions, who were 6-6 in James Franklin's initial year as head coach, will play in their first bowl game since the 2011 postseason, when they competed in the Ticket City Bowl in Dallas. They were ineligible to participate in a bowl the last two seasons because of NCAA sanctions. This will be Penn State's 45th bowl appearance in program history; the Lions have compiled a 27-15-2 record on the field.
SPORTS
December 9, 2014 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Let's get this out in the open: The 76ers beat an undermanned Minnesota Timberwolves team on Wednesday and outlasted the poor-shooting and woefully constructed Detroit Pistons three days later. On the surface, that's not something to get hyped up about. But we are talking about the same Sixers team that only a couple of weeks ago had some people thinking it could lose to the University of Kentucky. It's the same team that has seven undrafted free agents, the lowest payroll in the NBA, and is the youngest team in league history.
SPORTS
December 7, 2014 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
This is it, the final week of college football's regular season and the last chance for contending teams to impress the College Football Playoff Committee in advance of Sunday's final vote. The guess here is that Alabama advances into the top four with an SEC championship game win and Florida State squeezes in if it defeats Georgia Tech for the ACC title. But what about the Texas Christian-Baylor debate and how Ohio State's fate will be decided if the Buckeyes can defeat Wisconsin with their backup quarterback?
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The Red Knot, a shorebird which has undergone a drastic decline in recent years, will be listed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act, according to the New Jersey Audubon. The action, which is expected to be announced next week, is a critical step toward the long-term protection and recovery of the species, said New Jersey Audubon, which has long addressed issues related to the Red Knot and other shorebirds. The listing would mean that the species meets the Endangered Species Act criteria of being likely to become in danger of extinction in the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range.
SPORTS
December 5, 2014 | By Bob Cooney, Daily News Staff Writer
THE 76ERS got their first win of the season Wednesday in Minnesota, 18 games into what no doubt will continue to be a wretched season beginning tonight against the visiting Oklahoma City Thunder. Now that the first win has been obtained and the NBA record for consecutive losses to begin a season still belongs to the 2009-10 Nets, with the Sixers falling one loss short of that mark, the national media will stay away from the train wreck for a while - at least until the next record-threatening streak arises.
NEWS
December 5, 2014
B UZZ: Hey, Marnie, I'm in charge of beverages for our office Christmas party, but I'm not sure how much wine to get. Any advice? Marnie: Figuring out how much wine to buy for parties is always a challenge, since consumption can vary widely, but here are some rules of thumb I use: First, calculate the number of guests and the length of the event. I usually plan on one drink per person for the first half hour, then one more per hour thereafter. Buzz: Ha! My friend Howard will go through twice that.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Commodore Barry Bridge is about to get a $100 million makeover. A Delaware River Port Authority board committee on Wednesday approved the first of three phases of sandblasting and painting that will continue for five years, starting in January and continuing through 2019. The $22 million contracts approved Wednesday still need to be approved by the full DRPA board next week. The bridge links Chester and Logan Township. It is the third-busiest of four DRPA toll bridges between South Jersey and Pennsylvania, carrying 6.5 million vehicles a year.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the heels of the announcement that Joseph Neubauer will step down as chairman of Aramark Corp. in February, the Philadelphia company said Wednesday that existing shareholders intended to sell 22.5 million shares. The sellers are private equity firms that took Aramark private in 2007 and public again - for the third time in its history - one year ago, and still own 60 percent of the $15 billion food-services giant. The Securities and Exchange Commission filing did not say if Neubauer, who joined Aramark in 1979 and became chief executive in 1983, would sell any of his shares.
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