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NEWS
February 20, 1991 | By Peter Finn, Special to The Inquirer
Eugene Feldman, the Camden County surrogate, was pacing the room and talking with a volubility that defied his subject: death and, more particularly, dying. "Modern technology has done tremendous things for us in keeping us alive," Feldman said. "But in some cases, it has done too good a job. People are tired of not dying. " A wave of assent, like revival amens, rippled from about 20 senior citizens who had gathered to listen to Feldman at the Brendenwood Retirement Community in Voorhees.
NEWS
October 21, 1987 | By Virginia M. Resnik, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteer firefighters in Camden County have the opportunity to have their wills drawn up by a lawyer free of charge under a new program offered through the Camden County Surrogate's Office. For the last two years, the office has run a program offering free wills to senior citizens, according to Gene Feldman, the county surrogate. Under that program, about 3,500 wills have been drawn up. Now, the will service is being offered to volunteer firefighters because they place their lives at risk for the sake of their communities without pay, Feldman said.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloucester County Surrogate Donald H. Wagner harshly criticized Freeholder Jay H. Sharp last night for suggesting that there may be improprieties in the program providing free wills for senior citizens. Sharp, a Republican seeking re-election, said last week that he was concerned about where the funds for the surrogate's program were kept and about the propriety of Wagner's selecting the lawyer to draw up the wills. "I am hurt and dismayed real deeply regarding some of the comments I've heard made," said Wagner, a Democrat also seeking re-election.
NEWS
July 17, 2015
J OSEPH DOUGHERTY, the 73-year-old former labor leader awaiting sentencing next week on a federal racketeering conviction, just found out the hard way that not even Shakespeare can soften the blow of a judge's gavel. U.S. District Judge Michael Baylson yesterday rejected Dougherty's Hail Mary motion for an acquittal or a new trial. Baylson began the ruling thusly: "Who finds the heifer dead and bleeding fresh, And sees fast by a butcher with an axe, But will suspect 'twas he that made the slaughter?"
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
The daughter of a wealthy Phoenixville developer yesterday accused her younger brother of forging their parents' wills and cheating her out of her full inheritance. Anita Elizabeth Gerhold, 41, of Greenfield, Pa., testified in Chester County Court at the forgery trial of her brother Richard J. Puleo, 34, that their father, Joseph Puleo Sr., had property and other assets valued at more than $4.3 million. In a 1981 will signed by the father, Gerhold said that she, Richard Puleo and two older brothers were made co-executors and shared equally in the estate.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Phoenixville lawyer, charged with drawing up bogus wills for his parents to reduce his sister's inheritance, was acquitted of forgery and related offenses yesterday by a Chester County jury. Richard J. Puleo, 33, the youngest son of a wealthy Phoenixville developer, testified Wednesday that his father, Joseph A. Puleo Sr. and his mother, Lena Puleo, had given him power of attorney to handle their legal affairs. Richard Puleo said he believed that this authority made it legal for him to sign his parents' names to their wills.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
James F. Proud, Delaware County's register of wills and a solicitor for several area towns, was nominated by Gov. Ridge yesterday to fill a county judgeship left vacant in April. The nomination of the 51-year-old Wallingford Republican is subject to confirmation by the Senate. It comes after five months of chatter in the Delaware County Courthouse about whom the governor would nominate. Proud, often touted as professional and hard-working, was long considered the top choice.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Whoever thought that probating wills would be such an attractive job? As the primary nears in Gloucester County, it's the office of surrogate that is getting all of the attention - and is causing the most problems for both political parties. Neither party expected to have a primary contest, but when longtime political figure Donald Wagner announced early this year that he would be retiring from the Surrogate's Office, the field opened wide, prompting both parties to open their coffers and take sides.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The federal government may soon require hospitals and doctors to give patients information on living wills, documents that allow people to stipulate when they want life-support systems turned off. Critics say that the move would result in government-sanctioned mercy killings, but supporters say it would help prevent patients from being kept alive against their wishes. A provision in a deficit-cutting bill approved early Saturday by the Senate Finance Committee would require hospitals and doctors participating in the Medicare program to ask patients if they had signed a living will and to offer information about the wills to interested adults.
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BUSINESS
May 23, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
Betting on a hard-driving, tough-bargaining mother of two who left the lucrative field of pharmaceutical sales to start a business in the far-less-glamorous wilds of commercial cleaning, Philadelphia's Enterprise Center has debuted a new funding offering. The assistance agency for high-potential minority entrepreneurs has made its first equity investment since its founding by the Wharton Small Business Development Center in 1989. The approved recipient of that $211,000 infusion is Pat Claybrook, 54, of Medford, who started Jidan Cleaning L.L.C.
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By Molly Eichel, Staff Writer
Jesse Custer isn't your typical man of God. Few people of the cloth, for instance, could take down a group of angry military reenactors while hammered on whisky and wallowing in self-pity. Then again, few clergymen are former criminals who have been possessed by a supernatural being, giving them the power to make people do whatever the hell they say. Custer, played by Dominic Cooper (Howard Stark in the Marvel Cinematic Universe), is the title character in Preacher . AMC's newest foray into the world of comic books, it premieres at 10 p.m. Sunday with a 90-minute episode.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Higher inflation "has been set in motion," James Marple , senior economist for TD Bank Group , tells clients in a new report. Oil prices bounced back up 70 percent from May to February; he expects they'll rise modestly into next year, boosting price levels generally. Higher prices aren't all bad: "Wage pressures have been building," too, Marple adds, with median pay for people with jobs up 3 percent over the past year, faster than economic growth. Berwyn-based food analyst Jonathan Feeney tells his clients at Athlos Research to brace for rising prices on foreign grain, meats, and sweeteners.
NEWS
May 21, 2016
Because advertising is a barometer that often accurately measures America's psychological atmosphere, attention must be paid to this: From Monday through the presidential election, Budweiser beer will bear a different name. Eager to do its bit to make America great again, the brewer will replace the name Budweiser with America on its 12-ounce bottles and cans. The Financial Times says this is "a bid to capitalize on U.S. election fever. " (Before the Chicago Cubs bestrode the world like a colossus, T-shirts proclaimed "Cubs Fever: Catch it - and die. ")
SPORTS
May 20, 2016 | By Marc Narducci, STAFF WRITER
Goalkeeper Andre Blake has not missed a game for the Union, and with a 1.10 goals-against average he is a major reason for their 4-3-3 start. The Union, however, will eventually have to do without Blake in Major League Soccer play. When that happens is still up for debate, but Blake will miss time when he plays for Jamaica in the Copa America Tournament from June 3 to 26. MLS teams will miss players for some games even though there is a break in league action during part of the tournament.
NEWS
May 20, 2016 | By Barry M. Popkin
MAJOR RESISTANCE in the seven other countries proposing or adopting taxes on sugar-sweetened drinks has come from the beverage industry. However, it's only in the United States where a prominent progressive voice such as Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders has offered strident opposition. In other countries, such as the United Kingdom, France and Mexico, progressives have promoted these taxes. The beverage industry and the few progressives who align with it call these taxes "regressive," warning that they that hurt the poor.
SPORTS
May 20, 2016 | By Dick Jerardi, STAFF WRITER
BALTIMORE - When a really good horse wins the Kentucky Derby, that horse rarely loses the Preakness. See American Pharoah, California Chrome, Big Brown and Smarty Jones, as examples this century. I wasn't ready to put Nyquist in their class before the Derby. I am now. If you think Exaggerator was eventually going to pass Nyquist, think again. If you kept watching past the wire, you noticed the final margin actually increased as the horses galloped to the first turn. Exaggerator's jockey, Kent Desormeaux, said he lost momentum on his late runner heading into the far turn.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
THIS KIND of behavior could get a guy killed in New Jersey. NBC News reports that Claudio Bevilacqua , a paramedic who was called to aid James Gandolfini after The Sopranos' star suffered a fatal heart attack in 2013, went on trial Monday in Rome for allegedly snatching the $3,000 Rolex Submariner off the actor's cold, dead wrist. Talk about cold. He could be Tony Soprano's mother. However, it is possible that the watch vanished before the actor collapsed. Possibly from his hotel room.
SPORTS
May 19, 2016 | By Joe Juliano, STAFF WRITER
Officials at the Philadelphia Cricket Club didn't know what to expect when they landed two significant tournaments in as many years on which to showcase their newly restored golf course: a national championship and a PGA Tour Champions major. However, after a successful run last year with the PGA Professional National Championship, club members are eager and ready to host the Constellation Senior Players Championship, the third of five majors on the tour formerly known as the Senior PGA Tour, beginning June 9. "You take a chance on those things and it is an inconvenience and you lose your club for a few weeks," club president Michael J. Vergare said Tuesday at the event's media day. "But at the same time, people just rallied around [the Professional National Championship]
SPORTS
May 18, 2016 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Now that the 76ers have reached the jumping-off point that general manager Sam Hinkie constructed slowly and carefully for most of three NBA seasons, the biggest mystery that remains is not why owner Josh Harris bought into the analytical poison pill he swallowed in 2013 but why he spit it out just as the medicine was about to take effect one way or the other. Sure, there's something comforting about hiring a passel of Colangelos to tidy up the team's tattered image within the league, but Tuesday's draft lottery is not really theirs to claim.
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