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Wills

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NEWS
February 20, 1991 | By Peter Finn, Special to The Inquirer
Eugene Feldman, the Camden County surrogate, was pacing the room and talking with a volubility that defied his subject: death and, more particularly, dying. "Modern technology has done tremendous things for us in keeping us alive," Feldman said. "But in some cases, it has done too good a job. People are tired of not dying. " A wave of assent, like revival amens, rippled from about 20 senior citizens who had gathered to listen to Feldman at the Brendenwood Retirement Community in Voorhees.
NEWS
October 21, 1987 | By Virginia M. Resnik, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteer firefighters in Camden County have the opportunity to have their wills drawn up by a lawyer free of charge under a new program offered through the Camden County Surrogate's Office. For the last two years, the office has run a program offering free wills to senior citizens, according to Gene Feldman, the county surrogate. Under that program, about 3,500 wills have been drawn up. Now, the will service is being offered to volunteer firefighters because they place their lives at risk for the sake of their communities without pay, Feldman said.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloucester County Surrogate Donald H. Wagner harshly criticized Freeholder Jay H. Sharp last night for suggesting that there may be improprieties in the program providing free wills for senior citizens. Sharp, a Republican seeking re-election, said last week that he was concerned about where the funds for the surrogate's program were kept and about the propriety of Wagner's selecting the lawyer to draw up the wills. "I am hurt and dismayed real deeply regarding some of the comments I've heard made," said Wagner, a Democrat also seeking re-election.
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
The daughter of a wealthy Phoenixville developer yesterday accused her younger brother of forging their parents' wills and cheating her out of her full inheritance. Anita Elizabeth Gerhold, 41, of Greenfield, Pa., testified in Chester County Court at the forgery trial of her brother Richard J. Puleo, 34, that their father, Joseph Puleo Sr., had property and other assets valued at more than $4.3 million. In a 1981 will signed by the father, Gerhold said that she, Richard Puleo and two older brothers were made co-executors and shared equally in the estate.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
James F. Proud, Delaware County's register of wills and a solicitor for several area towns, was nominated by Gov. Ridge yesterday to fill a county judgeship left vacant in April. The nomination of the 51-year-old Wallingford Republican is subject to confirmation by the Senate. It comes after five months of chatter in the Delaware County Courthouse about whom the governor would nominate. Proud, often touted as professional and hard-working, was long considered the top choice.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Phoenixville lawyer, charged with drawing up bogus wills for his parents to reduce his sister's inheritance, was acquitted of forgery and related offenses yesterday by a Chester County jury. Richard J. Puleo, 33, the youngest son of a wealthy Phoenixville developer, testified Wednesday that his father, Joseph A. Puleo Sr. and his mother, Lena Puleo, had given him power of attorney to handle their legal affairs. Richard Puleo said he believed that this authority made it legal for him to sign his parents' names to their wills.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Whoever thought that probating wills would be such an attractive job? As the primary nears in Gloucester County, it's the office of surrogate that is getting all of the attention - and is causing the most problems for both political parties. Neither party expected to have a primary contest, but when longtime political figure Donald Wagner announced early this year that he would be retiring from the Surrogate's Office, the field opened wide, prompting both parties to open their coffers and take sides.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The federal government may soon require hospitals and doctors to give patients information on living wills, documents that allow people to stipulate when they want life-support systems turned off. Critics say that the move would result in government-sanctioned mercy killings, but supporters say it would help prevent patients from being kept alive against their wishes. A provision in a deficit-cutting bill approved early Saturday by the Senate Finance Committee would require hospitals and doctors participating in the Medicare program to ask patients if they had signed a living will and to offer information about the wills to interested adults.
NEWS
July 12, 1991 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
It began in 1975, when Joe Quinlan walked into Paul Armstrong's office and told the lawyer he wanted help getting his daughter, Karen Ann, removed from a respirator. That desire, and the New Jersey Supreme Court decision that ultimately allowed it, prompted an international debate on the right to die and spawned the practice of people writing living wills in almost every state in the nation. Yesterday, New Jersey, where the debate began, became the 48th state to legally recognize living wills, the documents that allow people to say in advance what sort of care they want and who should make health-care decisions for them if they become incapacitated.
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SPORTS
November 20, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Critics of the NFL's $765 million settlement proposal to compensate former players for concussion-related health problems will finally have their day in court Wednesday, as the designers of the landmark deal push for final approval from a federal judge. U.S. District Judge Anita Brody, who has overseen the massive case involving more than 5,000 individual lawsuits and 20,000 potentially eligible league retirees, is set to preside over a fairness hearing in what could be one of the final steps to resolving a legal fight that began three years ago with allegations that the league hid or ignored the long-term dangers of head-hits for decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
PHILADELPHIA's fave pitcher, Mo'ne Davis , the first girl to win a Little League World Series game, is writing her memoir. Mo'ne Davis: Remember My Name will be released next March by HarperCollins Children's Books, the publisher told the Associated Press yesterday. Even though Mo'ne is an honor-roll student, she will get some help with the book from Hilary Beard , whose previous collaborations include Promises Kept: Raising Black Boys to Succeed in School and in Life . Mo'ne became a sensation this summer after leading the Taney Dragons to a 4-0 victory over Nashville in the LLWS, when she was just 13. Known for her long braids and uncommon poise, she has since appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated , thrown out the first pitch at a major league World Series game and starred in a car commercial directed by Spike Lee . In September, she donated her jersey to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y., and a week from Thursday she and her fellow Taney Dragons will help kick off the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade.
NEWS
November 17, 2014
WE LEARNED many new things at City Council's hearings on Philadelphia's energy future last week. Here's one: components of natural gas include propane, butane, methane . . . and here, in Philadelphia, civic pain. We're referring to the pain of listening to experts on Philadelphia's future as an energy hub and wondering why the city wasn't having these discussions years ago. And the pain of realizing that PGW's private ownership could be a key to the city's future as an energy hub, but Council killed that prospect just last week primarily because of "process" instead of the potential outcome for the city as a whole.
NEWS
November 14, 2014 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
BRETT BROWN is no stranger to the game of Dallas Mavericks forward Dirk Nowitzki. As an assistant with the San Antonio Spurs, Brown has seen more Nowitizki exploits than he cares to remember, both during the regular season and playoffs. On Tuesday, with his 23 points, the 17-year vet from Germany surpassed Hakeem Olajuwon on the NBA scoring list to become the highest scorer born outside of the United States. His 26,953 points rank him No. 9 on the all-time list. He has scored 19,452 more points than the entire roster that will be available for Brown tonight when 76ers face the Mavs.
NEWS
November 13, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delaware County Council on Wednesday passed a resolution calling on the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board not to issue another casino license in the Philadelphia area until the economy improves. The county, home to Harrah's Philadelphia, in Chester, has included $8.6 million from Harrah's in its 2015 budget, councilman John P. McBlain said. A South Philadelphia casino would result in an estimated 30-percent decline in revenue at Harrah's. That would translate into a loss of $2.5 million in revenue to the county, McBlain said.
SPORTS
November 12, 2014 | By Mark Macyk, Inquirer Staff Writer
Luke Duris wasn't trying to score the goal that sent Holy Ghost Prep back to Hershey. He was standing more than 40 yards away from the net, and he isn't crazy. He was simply aiming for his teammate's head. "That's a far kick," Duris said. "I wasn't going to shoot it. . . . The goal is to find Joey Braun's head and whip it in as hard as you can. " Instead, Duris drilled his direct kick over the goalie with 23 minutes, 1 second remaining in the first half to send Holy Ghost Prep to a 2-1 victory over Fleetwood in a PIAA Class AA boys' soccer semifinal Tuesday night at Souderton.
SPORTS
November 12, 2014 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
During his introductory news conference with the 76ers in 2013, Nerlens Noel said what many fans were thinking after that summer's draft. "Sam [Hinkie] is a genius," Noel said. "How can you think of something like that?" The center/power forward's reaction came after the Sixers general manager acquired him and his longtime friend Michael Carter-Williams on draft night. The two players grew up in the Boston area and were AAU teammates. "A lot of credit goes to him for building that as a foundation for this organization into the future," Noel said then.
SPORTS
November 11, 2014 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - It was the most lopsided defeat of Bernard Hopkins' career. The judges at Boardwalk Hall failed to award the 49-year-old a single round in Saturday's unanimous-decision loss to Sergey Kovalev. Hopkins threw 390 fewer punches than the Russian slugger. And none of his attacks seemed to inflict much pain. Perhaps it was time for Hopkins, who looked ageless until Saturday, to walk away. "Asking me to fight right now is like asking a woman that was just in nine-hour labor if she's going to have another baby," Hopkins said.
SPORTS
November 10, 2014 | BY JAKE KAPLAN, Daily News Staff Writer kaplanj@phillynews.com
ATLANTIC CITY - At about a quarter to 2 yesterday morning, an hour after relinquishing his shiny IBF and WBA light heavyweight belts, the man who holds the record as the oldest world champion in boxing history emerged from his locker room at Boardwalk Hall. Flanked by a hoard of supporters, Bernard Hopkins made the short walk to the postfight news conference. He stepped behind the podium, offered opening remarks and then took the first question. It was the query on everyone's mind.
SPORTS
November 10, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
NFL commissioner Roger Goodell was a little busy last week as he prepared to explain to an appeals judge his finger-in-the-wind decision process regarding the suspension and re-suspension of Baltimore running back Ray Rice. Even so, Goodell must have noticed that one of the league's owners, Washington's Daniel Snyder, was suing five Native Americans for the crime of being upset about the "Redskins" team nickname. If he wins the suit, maybe Snyder can take their land and force them to live in a fenced-in section of the FedEx Field parking lot. Not much of a view, but, hey, no income tax. The five activists, perhaps to their own surprise, won a ruling earlier this year from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office that canceled six of the team's trademarks that used the word "Redskins," with the ruling board stating it did so because the word was "disparaging to Native Americans.
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