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Wills

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NEWS
February 20, 1991 | By Peter Finn, Special to The Inquirer
Eugene Feldman, the Camden County surrogate, was pacing the room and talking with a volubility that defied his subject: death and, more particularly, dying. "Modern technology has done tremendous things for us in keeping us alive," Feldman said. "But in some cases, it has done too good a job. People are tired of not dying. " A wave of assent, like revival amens, rippled from about 20 senior citizens who had gathered to listen to Feldman at the Brendenwood Retirement Community in Voorhees.
NEWS
October 21, 1987 | By Virginia M. Resnik, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteer firefighters in Camden County have the opportunity to have their wills drawn up by a lawyer free of charge under a new program offered through the Camden County Surrogate's Office. For the last two years, the office has run a program offering free wills to senior citizens, according to Gene Feldman, the county surrogate. Under that program, about 3,500 wills have been drawn up. Now, the will service is being offered to volunteer firefighters because they place their lives at risk for the sake of their communities without pay, Feldman said.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloucester County Surrogate Donald H. Wagner harshly criticized Freeholder Jay H. Sharp last night for suggesting that there may be improprieties in the program providing free wills for senior citizens. Sharp, a Republican seeking re-election, said last week that he was concerned about where the funds for the surrogate's program were kept and about the propriety of Wagner's selecting the lawyer to draw up the wills. "I am hurt and dismayed real deeply regarding some of the comments I've heard made," said Wagner, a Democrat also seeking re-election.
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
The daughter of a wealthy Phoenixville developer yesterday accused her younger brother of forging their parents' wills and cheating her out of her full inheritance. Anita Elizabeth Gerhold, 41, of Greenfield, Pa., testified in Chester County Court at the forgery trial of her brother Richard J. Puleo, 34, that their father, Joseph Puleo Sr., had property and other assets valued at more than $4.3 million. In a 1981 will signed by the father, Gerhold said that she, Richard Puleo and two older brothers were made co-executors and shared equally in the estate.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
James F. Proud, Delaware County's register of wills and a solicitor for several area towns, was nominated by Gov. Ridge yesterday to fill a county judgeship left vacant in April. The nomination of the 51-year-old Wallingford Republican is subject to confirmation by the Senate. It comes after five months of chatter in the Delaware County Courthouse about whom the governor would nominate. Proud, often touted as professional and hard-working, was long considered the top choice.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Phoenixville lawyer, charged with drawing up bogus wills for his parents to reduce his sister's inheritance, was acquitted of forgery and related offenses yesterday by a Chester County jury. Richard J. Puleo, 33, the youngest son of a wealthy Phoenixville developer, testified Wednesday that his father, Joseph A. Puleo Sr. and his mother, Lena Puleo, had given him power of attorney to handle their legal affairs. Richard Puleo said he believed that this authority made it legal for him to sign his parents' names to their wills.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Whoever thought that probating wills would be such an attractive job? As the primary nears in Gloucester County, it's the office of surrogate that is getting all of the attention - and is causing the most problems for both political parties. Neither party expected to have a primary contest, but when longtime political figure Donald Wagner announced early this year that he would be retiring from the Surrogate's Office, the field opened wide, prompting both parties to open their coffers and take sides.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The federal government may soon require hospitals and doctors to give patients information on living wills, documents that allow people to stipulate when they want life-support systems turned off. Critics say that the move would result in government-sanctioned mercy killings, but supporters say it would help prevent patients from being kept alive against their wishes. A provision in a deficit-cutting bill approved early Saturday by the Senate Finance Committee would require hospitals and doctors participating in the Medicare program to ask patients if they had signed a living will and to offer information about the wills to interested adults.
NEWS
July 12, 1991 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
It began in 1975, when Joe Quinlan walked into Paul Armstrong's office and told the lawyer he wanted help getting his daughter, Karen Ann, removed from a respirator. That desire, and the New Jersey Supreme Court decision that ultimately allowed it, prompted an international debate on the right to die and spawned the practice of people writing living wills in almost every state in the nation. Yesterday, New Jersey, where the debate began, became the 48th state to legally recognize living wills, the documents that allow people to say in advance what sort of care they want and who should make health-care decisions for them if they become incapacitated.
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SPORTS
May 20, 2015 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Since this season began, the NBA draft on June 25 has been targeted as the third stage of the 76ers' rebuilding process. It served as a glimmer of hope as the team opened the season with 17 consecutive losses as part of Tanking Part II. There was a sense that a good draw in the draft would erase all the misery. The lottery has arrived. It will be held Tuesday night at the New York Hilton Midtown. Former college standouts in center Karl-Anthony Towns (Kentucky), center Jahlil Okafor (Duke)
SPORTS
May 20, 2015 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
WITH DAVE HAKSTOL at the helm, the next question is: Who will be joining him on the Flyers' bench next season? When Craig Berube was fired on April 17, general manager Ron Hextall said the fate of assistant coaches Ian Laperriere, Gord Murphy and Joe Mullen rested in the hands of the team's 19th head coach. Now, surrounding rookie head coach Hakstol with an NHL-experienced staff will be the top priority. That process began after yesterday's introductory press conference. "We'll form a staff from there," Hextall said.
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
The city commissioners' offices that line one hallway in City Hall have one of the most important civic duties come Tuesday: overseeing the election. In that same election, voters will decide whom they would like to supervise the elections in 2016 and the three following years. Given the mayor's race and some contested City Council races, there's been little talk about the commissioners race. But that doesn't mean it's not important, said David Thornburgh, CEO of the Committee of Seventy, who called what the commissioners do "significant.
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani and Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writers
David Letterman is the last of the late-night giants. After three decades on late-night TV, Letterman will end his reign at 11:35 p.m. Wednesday on CBS. No one on TV ever will have the impact Letterman had on the comedic landscape. He upheld the strange, the absurd, and the cynical, paying no deference to the status quo. So we say goodbye to Letterman, the longest-running late-night host in history, with the most appropriate of numerics: 10 reasons Letterman will never be replaced.
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Paul Nussbaum, and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Federal Railroad Administration ordered Amtrak on Saturday to immediately install an electronic braking system at the Frankford curve that - if it had been in place last week - likely would have prevented the train derailment that killed eight people and injured more than 200. Amtrak officials said the system would be in place by the time the damaged line is reopened, perhaps as early as Tuesday, and "most certainly will be safer. " Service between Philadelphia and New York remains suspended through Monday, affecting thousands of commuters.
SPORTS
May 15, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Union's struggling offense has another obstacle to overcome. Leading scorer Fernando Aristeguieta will miss the game against D.C. United on Sunday at PPL Park because of a national team commitment. Aristeguieta has been named to the preliminary roster for the Venezuelan national team ahead of the Copa America tournament. The Union (1-7-3) have lost four in a row. They host a D.C. United team that took a 5-1-3 record into a home game Wednesday against Orlando City. Aristeguieta, 23, is the only Union player with more than one goal.
SPORTS
May 15, 2015 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
As far as the Flyers are concerned, the playoffs have produced mixed results regarding some of their future draft picks. The good news: The Flyers have benefited from Chicago's reaching the Western Conference finals. The bad news: The draft pick the Flyers acquired from Tampa Bay has been pushed to late in the first round because the Lightning have reached the Eastern Conference final. The Flyers own Tampa Bay's first pick in the June draft, a selection they acquired as part of the Braydon Coburn deal.
SPORTS
May 15, 2015 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHICAGO - By now, the 76ers have a good idea which players they might select with their first pick in the NBA draft on June 25. However, their selection would be upgraded if they hit the jackpot Tuesday in the draft lottery and move up to the No. 1 overall pick. So the omission of three of the top four draft prospects from the scouting combine isn't as big as people might think. Karl-Anthony Towns (Kentucky), Jahlil Okafor (Duke), and Emmanuel Mudiay, who played this season in China, will not attend.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia will run Lancaster General Hospital's 19-bed pediatric unit and provide pediatric support in the emergency department starting July 1, Lancaster General and CHOP said Tuesday. CHOP's deal to provide inpatient serivces will replace a deal with the Penn State Hershey Medical Center and Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital that expires July 1. CHOP cardiologists will also provide services to inpatients and outpatients at Lancaster General.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Growing up in the South, Wilford "Will" Fuller, 44, who now commands a hefty salary as head of several divisions of Lincoln Financial Group, worked in a dye house, shoveling athletic socks into bleach vats. "We'd throw them into these big walk-in dryers," Fuller said. "We'd step into the dryer in hundred-degree heat and pitchfork" them out. Fuller now runs Lincoln's $124 billion annuity division and leads the entire company's sales operation, distributing Lincoln's retirement products through finance companies and advisers.
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