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Wills

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NEWS
February 20, 1991 | By Peter Finn, Special to The Inquirer
Eugene Feldman, the Camden County surrogate, was pacing the room and talking with a volubility that defied his subject: death and, more particularly, dying. "Modern technology has done tremendous things for us in keeping us alive," Feldman said. "But in some cases, it has done too good a job. People are tired of not dying. " A wave of assent, like revival amens, rippled from about 20 senior citizens who had gathered to listen to Feldman at the Brendenwood Retirement Community in Voorhees.
NEWS
October 21, 1987 | By Virginia M. Resnik, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteer firefighters in Camden County have the opportunity to have their wills drawn up by a lawyer free of charge under a new program offered through the Camden County Surrogate's Office. For the last two years, the office has run a program offering free wills to senior citizens, according to Gene Feldman, the county surrogate. Under that program, about 3,500 wills have been drawn up. Now, the will service is being offered to volunteer firefighters because they place their lives at risk for the sake of their communities without pay, Feldman said.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloucester County Surrogate Donald H. Wagner harshly criticized Freeholder Jay H. Sharp last night for suggesting that there may be improprieties in the program providing free wills for senior citizens. Sharp, a Republican seeking re-election, said last week that he was concerned about where the funds for the surrogate's program were kept and about the propriety of Wagner's selecting the lawyer to draw up the wills. "I am hurt and dismayed real deeply regarding some of the comments I've heard made," said Wagner, a Democrat also seeking re-election.
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
The daughter of a wealthy Phoenixville developer yesterday accused her younger brother of forging their parents' wills and cheating her out of her full inheritance. Anita Elizabeth Gerhold, 41, of Greenfield, Pa., testified in Chester County Court at the forgery trial of her brother Richard J. Puleo, 34, that their father, Joseph Puleo Sr., had property and other assets valued at more than $4.3 million. In a 1981 will signed by the father, Gerhold said that she, Richard Puleo and two older brothers were made co-executors and shared equally in the estate.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
James F. Proud, Delaware County's register of wills and a solicitor for several area towns, was nominated by Gov. Ridge yesterday to fill a county judgeship left vacant in April. The nomination of the 51-year-old Wallingford Republican is subject to confirmation by the Senate. It comes after five months of chatter in the Delaware County Courthouse about whom the governor would nominate. Proud, often touted as professional and hard-working, was long considered the top choice.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Phoenixville lawyer, charged with drawing up bogus wills for his parents to reduce his sister's inheritance, was acquitted of forgery and related offenses yesterday by a Chester County jury. Richard J. Puleo, 33, the youngest son of a wealthy Phoenixville developer, testified Wednesday that his father, Joseph A. Puleo Sr. and his mother, Lena Puleo, had given him power of attorney to handle their legal affairs. Richard Puleo said he believed that this authority made it legal for him to sign his parents' names to their wills.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Whoever thought that probating wills would be such an attractive job? As the primary nears in Gloucester County, it's the office of surrogate that is getting all of the attention - and is causing the most problems for both political parties. Neither party expected to have a primary contest, but when longtime political figure Donald Wagner announced early this year that he would be retiring from the Surrogate's Office, the field opened wide, prompting both parties to open their coffers and take sides.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The federal government may soon require hospitals and doctors to give patients information on living wills, documents that allow people to stipulate when they want life-support systems turned off. Critics say that the move would result in government-sanctioned mercy killings, but supporters say it would help prevent patients from being kept alive against their wishes. A provision in a deficit-cutting bill approved early Saturday by the Senate Finance Committee would require hospitals and doctors participating in the Medicare program to ask patients if they had signed a living will and to offer information about the wills to interested adults.
NEWS
July 12, 1991 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
It began in 1975, when Joe Quinlan walked into Paul Armstrong's office and told the lawyer he wanted help getting his daughter, Karen Ann, removed from a respirator. That desire, and the New Jersey Supreme Court decision that ultimately allowed it, prompted an international debate on the right to die and spawned the practice of people writing living wills in almost every state in the nation. Yesterday, New Jersey, where the debate began, became the 48th state to legally recognize living wills, the documents that allow people to say in advance what sort of care they want and who should make health-care decisions for them if they become incapacitated.
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NEWS
July 22, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
THE REV. KEVIN R. Johnson, embattled pastor of Bright Hope Baptist Church, will leave the 103-year-old North Philadelphia church on Oct. 31. Several congregants said Johnson announced from the pulpit yesterday that it was "crystal clear" after a contentious meeting of church leadership Thursday that the time had come for him to depart. "I have enjoyed Philadelphia," Johnson reportedly told the congregation. "But the Lord has told me it is time to move on. " He said that because his wife is "gainfully employed" as a lawyer, he will take his time seeking another pulpit, congregants said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
  STING   isn't the only celebrity not leaving his fortune to his kids. Citing court documents, the New York Post reports that Philip Seymour Hoffman , who died in February of a drug overdose, refused to set aside money for his three children (ages 5, 7 and 10) because he did not want them "to be considered 'trust fund' kids. " Hoffman instead left his estimated $35 million fortune to his children's mother, his longtime girlfriend. According to his accountant, David Friedman , Hoffman believed O'Donnell would "take care of the children," which does seem like a reasonable belief.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania has received a $10 million donation to create a center that aspires to develop new energy policy by reframing the relationship between research and practice. The Kleinman Center for Energy Policy will be named for donor Scott Kleinman and his wife, Wendy. He is a Wall Street private-equity manager and 1994 Penn alum. It will be directed by Mark Alan Hughes, a professor of practice at Penn's School of Design. Hughes was the city's first director of sustainability and is a former adviser to Mayor Nutter.
NEWS
July 17, 2014 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
His body was shaking like never before. Blood poured from a tiny cut between his wrist and his thumb. Moments earlier, around 8 p.m. Monday, David Bodkin-Parris, 14, had run to his friend's car, parked on Ashland Avenue in Glenolden, Delaware County. Thunder echoed around him. Wind shook the trees. Rain pounded the pavement. Then, it struck. "At first, it seemed not real," Bodkin said Tuesday. "I got hit by lightning. " Odds are one in 12,000 that someone will be struck by lightning in his or her lifetime, according to the National Weather Service.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new commission will study the effectiveness of student assessments, and the weight given to new standardized tests in teacher evaluations will be temporarily reduced, under a compromise announced Monday by the Christie administration. An executive order signed Monday by Gov. Christie calls for creation of a nine-member study commission, appointed by him, that will present recommendations on student assessments used in New Jersey and the Common Core curriculum standards. This coming school year, new standardized tests, the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness of College and Career (PARCC)
SPORTS
July 14, 2014 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Columnist
CLEARLY, you can indeed go home again, and if you are LeBron James, you dramatically change the entire power hierarchy of the National Basketball Association when you do it. The only thing close to the shakeup that James has caused by deciding to return to the Cleveland Cavaliers 4 years after he deserted them to take his talents to the Miami Heat was when Michael Jordan retired for the first time from the Chicago Bulls in 1993. "His Airness" put the basketball down for 1 1/2 seasons to pick up a baseball bat, but that did not kick off the domino effect that King James leaving South Beach has. In one heart-tug to return to his roots, James has reduced the Heat from a team that had gone to four consecutive NBA Finals and won two championships to one that very well soon could be preparing for the lottery.
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
What do higher gasoline taxes pay for? In Washington, the question has taken on increased urgency as Congress looks for ways to keep the federal Highway Trust Fund from running out of money in 80 days. And in Southeastern Pennsylvania, answers are already coming in, as transportation planners add $11 billion for highway, bridge, and transit projects that will be paid for largely by higher state gas taxes. Sens. Bob Corker (R., Tenn.) and Chris Murphy (D., Conn.) have proposed raising the federal gasoline tax by 12 cents a gallon over two years and linking it to inflation.
SPORTS
July 14, 2014 | By the Inquirer Staff
The Wings have played their final game in Philadelphia. The National Lacrosse League franchise announced plans Friday to move to a new market next season. The team has played in Philadelphia for 28 years, but the economics no longer work, owner and president Michael French said. "The financial model in a market with so many sport and entertainment alternatives has proven to be unsustainable," French said in a statement. "Finding a new venue with new strategic partners was the only way to ensure financial stability.
SPORTS
July 13, 2014 | DAILY NEWS STAFF
THE WINGS plan to relocate out of Philadelphia, the team announced on its website yesterday. In a news release on the site, the Wings, who won six league championships, said they are in discussions with a "new strategic partner" to move to an as-yet undisclosed location, pending approval by the National Lacrosse League Board of Governers. "My love for the Wings and my connection with the city has made this move all the more difficult," owner/president Michael French said in the release.
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