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NEWS
February 20, 1991 | By Peter Finn, Special to The Inquirer
Eugene Feldman, the Camden County surrogate, was pacing the room and talking with a volubility that defied his subject: death and, more particularly, dying. "Modern technology has done tremendous things for us in keeping us alive," Feldman said. "But in some cases, it has done too good a job. People are tired of not dying. " A wave of assent, like revival amens, rippled from about 20 senior citizens who had gathered to listen to Feldman at the Brendenwood Retirement Community in Voorhees.
NEWS
October 21, 1987 | By Virginia M. Resnik, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteer firefighters in Camden County have the opportunity to have their wills drawn up by a lawyer free of charge under a new program offered through the Camden County Surrogate's Office. For the last two years, the office has run a program offering free wills to senior citizens, according to Gene Feldman, the county surrogate. Under that program, about 3,500 wills have been drawn up. Now, the will service is being offered to volunteer firefighters because they place their lives at risk for the sake of their communities without pay, Feldman said.
NEWS
July 17, 2015
J OSEPH DOUGHERTY, the 73-year-old former labor leader awaiting sentencing next week on a federal racketeering conviction, just found out the hard way that not even Shakespeare can soften the blow of a judge's gavel. U.S. District Judge Michael Baylson yesterday rejected Dougherty's Hail Mary motion for an acquittal or a new trial. Baylson began the ruling thusly: "Who finds the heifer dead and bleeding fresh, And sees fast by a butcher with an axe, But will suspect 'twas he that made the slaughter?"
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloucester County Surrogate Donald H. Wagner harshly criticized Freeholder Jay H. Sharp last night for suggesting that there may be improprieties in the program providing free wills for senior citizens. Sharp, a Republican seeking re-election, said last week that he was concerned about where the funds for the surrogate's program were kept and about the propriety of Wagner's selecting the lawyer to draw up the wills. "I am hurt and dismayed real deeply regarding some of the comments I've heard made," said Wagner, a Democrat also seeking re-election.
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
The daughter of a wealthy Phoenixville developer yesterday accused her younger brother of forging their parents' wills and cheating her out of her full inheritance. Anita Elizabeth Gerhold, 41, of Greenfield, Pa., testified in Chester County Court at the forgery trial of her brother Richard J. Puleo, 34, that their father, Joseph Puleo Sr., had property and other assets valued at more than $4.3 million. In a 1981 will signed by the father, Gerhold said that she, Richard Puleo and two older brothers were made co-executors and shared equally in the estate.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Phoenixville lawyer, charged with drawing up bogus wills for his parents to reduce his sister's inheritance, was acquitted of forgery and related offenses yesterday by a Chester County jury. Richard J. Puleo, 33, the youngest son of a wealthy Phoenixville developer, testified Wednesday that his father, Joseph A. Puleo Sr. and his mother, Lena Puleo, had given him power of attorney to handle their legal affairs. Richard Puleo said he believed that this authority made it legal for him to sign his parents' names to their wills.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
James F. Proud, Delaware County's register of wills and a solicitor for several area towns, was nominated by Gov. Ridge yesterday to fill a county judgeship left vacant in April. The nomination of the 51-year-old Wallingford Republican is subject to confirmation by the Senate. It comes after five months of chatter in the Delaware County Courthouse about whom the governor would nominate. Proud, often touted as professional and hard-working, was long considered the top choice.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Whoever thought that probating wills would be such an attractive job? As the primary nears in Gloucester County, it's the office of surrogate that is getting all of the attention - and is causing the most problems for both political parties. Neither party expected to have a primary contest, but when longtime political figure Donald Wagner announced early this year that he would be retiring from the Surrogate's Office, the field opened wide, prompting both parties to open their coffers and take sides.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The federal government may soon require hospitals and doctors to give patients information on living wills, documents that allow people to stipulate when they want life-support systems turned off. Critics say that the move would result in government-sanctioned mercy killings, but supporters say it would help prevent patients from being kept alive against their wishes. A provision in a deficit-cutting bill approved early Saturday by the Senate Finance Committee would require hospitals and doctors participating in the Medicare program to ask patients if they had signed a living will and to offer information about the wills to interested adults.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 2, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas, Staff Writer
Let's say you count on earning $360,000 a year to take care of your many dependents, pay the bills, and stay afloat. You got lucky from 2010 to 2014, when you averaged about $552,000 a year. You were so flush that, in 2015, you gave your dependents a little extra, about $61,100. But last year, you saw your earnings slashed to $36,800. And to make matters worse, this year your earnings will be less, way less. And all along, however, the bills have to be paid, only they'll be higher this year.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2016
FOREVER: That's how long the United States promises to deliver snail mail bearing commemorative stamps, in four bright new designs, recalling the Star Trek TV series, a racial- allegorical space opera set 300 years in the future when it debuted 50 years ago. The stamps, two of which depict the Starship Enterprise and a traveler "beaming up," were designed in Old City at the Heads of State , a partnership formed by Hazelton native ...
REAL_ESTATE
February 1, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
Center City's walkability and accessible public transit are two major reasons home buyers give for moving there from the suburbs. But how many of those buyers are truly eager to give up their cars? Parking is still important to a home sale or apartment rental in Center City and adjacent neighborhoods, real estate agents and developers say. How important is determined by the price of the home or the monthly rent. "At higher price points - $600,000-plus - that buyer will pay a premium for parking," said Mickey Pascarella, an agent with Keller Williams Real Estate in Center City.
NEWS
January 31, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
A 17-year-old Camden girl charged with gunning down a 13-year-old boy in the city earlier this month will remain in police custody following a hearing Friday in Camden County Superior Court. The hearing was closed to the public because the suspect is a juvenile. Authorities have not released her name. More than a dozen relatives and friends of Nate Plummer Jr., who was killed around 11:15 p.m. Jan. 7 near his grandmother's East Camden home, crowded into the hallway outside the courtroom.
SPORTS
January 28, 2016 | By David Murphy, Daily News Columnist
SEVEN SOMEWHAT related observations . . . 1) I'm not sure Zach Ertz has the big-play ability to ever be a star in the NFL, but he is a solid tight end with good hands and the kind of mentality and work ethic that usually translates into steady improvement. In fact, when you put it that way, he sounds a lot like the guy who Tuesday restructured his deal in the wake of Ertz's new contract extension. Brent Celek knows firsthand what kind of numbers a tight end can put up in an Andy Reid offense.
NEWS
January 28, 2016 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Staff Writer
WHEN IT came time to build his administration last fall, Mayor Kenney didn't hesitate to turn to some familiar faces. Richard Ross was appointed the city's police commissioner. Mike DeBerardinis was tapped to be managing director. Debbie Mahler, Kenney's longtime aide in City Council, was named deputy mayor for intergovernmental affairs. But Kenney, the son of a retired Philadelphia fire battalion chief, committed himself early on to conducting a national search for a fire commissioner.
NEWS
January 28, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, POLITICS WRITER
MARSHALLTOWN, Iowa - Donald Trump said Tuesday that he would boycott the final Republican televised debate before the Iowa caucuses because Fox News had taunted him in a news release, rejecting his demands that the network remove anchor Megyn Kelly as a moderator. "The point is, they're dealing with somebody who's a little different," Trump said in a news conference before a rally here. "They can't toy with me. . . . It's time somebody plays the grown-up. " Instead, Trump said, he would hold an event Thursday to raise money for the Wounded Warriors Project, which helps combat veterans.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
Wills Eye Hospital is talking to donors about raising money to expand its Center City campus with a new research and medical-care facility that would replace a strip of vacant houses and an empty lot. The eye-care hospital is seeking to raise at least $30 million to build the new facility on South Ninth Street properties beside its main building at Walnut Street, chief executive officer Joseph P. Bilson said in a statement. "This area has become a very vibrant center for health care and academic medicine," Bilson said.
SPORTS
January 26, 2016 | By Bob Cooney, Staff Writer
BRETT BROWN has been in this position before. It was about this time a year ago when his team was starting to find a decent rhythm at both ends of the floor. Michael Carter-Williams and Nerlens Noel were learning how to play better together; rookies JaKarr Sampson and Jerami Grant were growing their games and Robert Covington was proving to be a legitimate NBA scorer. Then the rug got pulled out from under Brown when general manager Sam Hinkie traded MCW to the Milwaukee Bucks and the progression that had moved the team into being watchable and produced an 8-12 run from early January to early February was pretty much gone.
NEWS
January 26, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, WASHINGTON BUREAU
WASHINGTON - Republican anxiety is growing in Pennsylvania and corners of New Jersey over the possibility that Donald Trump or Ted Cruz will win the party's presidential nomination. Tough races loom down the ballot in both states - most prominently Republican Sen. Pat Toomey's re-election bid in Pennsylvania - and establishment figures worry that the bombastic New York billionaire or acerbic Texas senator could make the GOP toxic to critical swing voters in both states. "Their presence at the top of the ticket would create serious problems," said former Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Ridge, a Republican.
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