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Wills

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NEWS
February 20, 1991 | By Peter Finn, Special to The Inquirer
Eugene Feldman, the Camden County surrogate, was pacing the room and talking with a volubility that defied his subject: death and, more particularly, dying. "Modern technology has done tremendous things for us in keeping us alive," Feldman said. "But in some cases, it has done too good a job. People are tired of not dying. " A wave of assent, like revival amens, rippled from about 20 senior citizens who had gathered to listen to Feldman at the Brendenwood Retirement Community in Voorhees.
NEWS
October 21, 1987 | By Virginia M. Resnik, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteer firefighters in Camden County have the opportunity to have their wills drawn up by a lawyer free of charge under a new program offered through the Camden County Surrogate's Office. For the last two years, the office has run a program offering free wills to senior citizens, according to Gene Feldman, the county surrogate. Under that program, about 3,500 wills have been drawn up. Now, the will service is being offered to volunteer firefighters because they place their lives at risk for the sake of their communities without pay, Feldman said.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloucester County Surrogate Donald H. Wagner harshly criticized Freeholder Jay H. Sharp last night for suggesting that there may be improprieties in the program providing free wills for senior citizens. Sharp, a Republican seeking re-election, said last week that he was concerned about where the funds for the surrogate's program were kept and about the propriety of Wagner's selecting the lawyer to draw up the wills. "I am hurt and dismayed real deeply regarding some of the comments I've heard made," said Wagner, a Democrat also seeking re-election.
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
The daughter of a wealthy Phoenixville developer yesterday accused her younger brother of forging their parents' wills and cheating her out of her full inheritance. Anita Elizabeth Gerhold, 41, of Greenfield, Pa., testified in Chester County Court at the forgery trial of her brother Richard J. Puleo, 34, that their father, Joseph Puleo Sr., had property and other assets valued at more than $4.3 million. In a 1981 will signed by the father, Gerhold said that she, Richard Puleo and two older brothers were made co-executors and shared equally in the estate.
NEWS
July 17, 2015
J OSEPH DOUGHERTY, the 73-year-old former labor leader awaiting sentencing next week on a federal racketeering conviction, just found out the hard way that not even Shakespeare can soften the blow of a judge's gavel. U.S. District Judge Michael Baylson yesterday rejected Dougherty's Hail Mary motion for an acquittal or a new trial. Baylson began the ruling thusly: "Who finds the heifer dead and bleeding fresh, And sees fast by a butcher with an axe, But will suspect 'twas he that made the slaughter?"
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Phoenixville lawyer, charged with drawing up bogus wills for his parents to reduce his sister's inheritance, was acquitted of forgery and related offenses yesterday by a Chester County jury. Richard J. Puleo, 33, the youngest son of a wealthy Phoenixville developer, testified Wednesday that his father, Joseph A. Puleo Sr. and his mother, Lena Puleo, had given him power of attorney to handle their legal affairs. Richard Puleo said he believed that this authority made it legal for him to sign his parents' names to their wills.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
James F. Proud, Delaware County's register of wills and a solicitor for several area towns, was nominated by Gov. Ridge yesterday to fill a county judgeship left vacant in April. The nomination of the 51-year-old Wallingford Republican is subject to confirmation by the Senate. It comes after five months of chatter in the Delaware County Courthouse about whom the governor would nominate. Proud, often touted as professional and hard-working, was long considered the top choice.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Whoever thought that probating wills would be such an attractive job? As the primary nears in Gloucester County, it's the office of surrogate that is getting all of the attention - and is causing the most problems for both political parties. Neither party expected to have a primary contest, but when longtime political figure Donald Wagner announced early this year that he would be retiring from the Surrogate's Office, the field opened wide, prompting both parties to open their coffers and take sides.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The federal government may soon require hospitals and doctors to give patients information on living wills, documents that allow people to stipulate when they want life-support systems turned off. Critics say that the move would result in government-sanctioned mercy killings, but supporters say it would help prevent patients from being kept alive against their wishes. A provision in a deficit-cutting bill approved early Saturday by the Senate Finance Committee would require hospitals and doctors participating in the Medicare program to ask patients if they had signed a living will and to offer information about the wills to interested adults.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 28, 2016 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Staff Writer
With Atlantic City teetering on the brink of insolvency, Mayor Don Guardian is considering skipping a $1.8 million interest payment on municipal bonds due May 1, chief of staff Chris Filiciello said Tuesday. If the city missed the payment, it would be the first default by a New Jersey municipality since the Great Depression, Bloomberg News reported. New Jersey has always intervened to prevent distressed cities from missing debt payments or going bankrupt, but Gov. Christie has twice vetoed aid packages that would redirect casino funds, now assigned to marketing, to help Atlantic City with its debt.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
T YKA NELSON soon may be a very rich woman. Prince's 55-year-old sister, his only surviving full blood relative, believes that the Great Purple One didn't leave a will. That places her at No. 1 on the inheritance chart. To protect Prince's estate from the always-circling vultures, however, Tyka wisely asked a Minnesota court Tuesday to appoint Bremer Trust as special administrator to oversee his Paisley Park empire. Court documents say Bremer Bank provided financial services to Prince for many years.
SPORTS
April 28, 2016 | By Joe Juliano, STAFF WRITER
The Villanova men are trying something a little different at the Penn Relays this year, and coach Marcus O'Sullivan appears to be quite excited about it. As always, the Wildcats will run their first race at the 122nd carnival in Friday's distance medley relay, an event that covers 10 laps and 4,000 meters around Franklin Field. But a little more than four hours later, Villanova will take part in the sprint medley relay - a race of four laps and 1,600 meters that the Cats have entered "for the first time in my 18 years" as head coach, O'Sullivan said.
BUSINESS
April 28, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
Activist Kati Sipp and Comcast customers won't have a public forum this year to grill Comcast CEO Brian Roberts. Comcast Corp. has scrapped its traditional annual shareholder meeting, the site of protests over the Time Warner Cable deal and other issues, for an Internet-based, "virtual" shareholder meeting. The company, which earned $8.2 billion in profits and paid its top six executives $176 million in 2015, said the online shareholder meeting will save Comcast on meeting costs at the Kimmel Center.
NEWS
April 28, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Jeremy Roebuck, and Claudia Vargas, STAFF WRITERS
Chaka Fattah, a fixture in Philadelphia politics for three decades, was ousted from the Second Congressional District seat by State Rep. Dwight Evans in Tuesday's Democratic primary. Fattah's fall came 20 days before the start of his federal criminal trial, an impending peril he tried to downplay as he campaigned for a 12th term. Fattah conceded just after 10 p.m. He stuck to the twin themes of his campaign - his long record of bringing resources to the district, and his complaint that the media did not give those accomplishments attention.
SPORTS
April 28, 2016 | By Sam Carchidi, STAFF WRITER
Steve Mason and Michal Neuvirth both want to be the Flyers' No. 1 goalie next season, which will make an interesting subplot when training camp opens in September. "Over the course of the summer, I'm going to prepare to be a No. 1 guy," Mason said after the players cleared out their lockers at the team's Voorhees practice facility Tuesday. "Nothing is given. Nothing was given this year. Both of us had to earn playing time, so I go into next season not expecting to be given anything and having to come in and earn everything.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Jennifer Childs, longtime artistic director for 1812 Productions, debuts Tuesday night in her self-penned, one-woman show I Will Not Go Gently at Plays & Players Theatre. Childs plays multiple roles in a musical tale of ageism, egoism, comebacks, and rock and roll. Three characters - a podcasting fan-mom, a faded television heroine, and a tech-centric tween - try to grab for glory they may or may not ever have had. These characters all bear some connection to Sierra Mist, an imaginary '70s/'80s female rocker icon whose music and image (Childs says)
NEWS
April 27, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
YOU KNOW what today is, right? ASPCA Help a Horse Day. And Pennsylvania Primary Day. (Also Delaware, Maryland, Connecticut and Rhode Island, but we are the Big Enchilada.) This year, for a change, despite our late-to-the-party primary, Pennsylvania can be the La Brea tar pit for Bernie Sanders, Ted Cruz, and John Kasich. The dance can end here. After the drubbing Sanders and Cruz took in the Vampire State - oops, Empire State - a Keystone State loss will be an insurmountable roadblock for the senators, who are playing hardball, and for the governor, who is playing Yahtzee.
NEWS
April 26, 2016
ISSUE | PRINCE A lasting influence I was a fan of Prince in the 1980s, when I was growing up. I owned some of his albums, including Purple Rain , Around the World in a Day , and Parade . My favorite Prince songs are "I Wanna Be Your Lover," "Controversy," "1999," "Little Red Corvette," "Purple Rain," "When Doves Cry," "Let's Go Crazy," "I Would Die 4 U," "Raspberry Beret," "Pop Life," "Mountains," "Sign 'O' the Times," "Diamonds...
NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Phil Galewitz, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
In states that expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, low-income adults were more likely to see a doctor, stay overnight in a hospital, and receive their first diagnoses of diabetes and high cholesterol, according to a study published Monday. Yet researchers found no improvement in adults' own assessments of their health, a conclusion echoed by similar studies, the authors wrote in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Two factors might explain the lack of perceived improvement.
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