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NEWS
February 20, 1991 | By Peter Finn, Special to The Inquirer
Eugene Feldman, the Camden County surrogate, was pacing the room and talking with a volubility that defied his subject: death and, more particularly, dying. "Modern technology has done tremendous things for us in keeping us alive," Feldman said. "But in some cases, it has done too good a job. People are tired of not dying. " A wave of assent, like revival amens, rippled from about 20 senior citizens who had gathered to listen to Feldman at the Brendenwood Retirement Community in Voorhees.
NEWS
October 21, 1987 | By Virginia M. Resnik, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteer firefighters in Camden County have the opportunity to have their wills drawn up by a lawyer free of charge under a new program offered through the Camden County Surrogate's Office. For the last two years, the office has run a program offering free wills to senior citizens, according to Gene Feldman, the county surrogate. Under that program, about 3,500 wills have been drawn up. Now, the will service is being offered to volunteer firefighters because they place their lives at risk for the sake of their communities without pay, Feldman said.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloucester County Surrogate Donald H. Wagner harshly criticized Freeholder Jay H. Sharp last night for suggesting that there may be improprieties in the program providing free wills for senior citizens. Sharp, a Republican seeking re-election, said last week that he was concerned about where the funds for the surrogate's program were kept and about the propriety of Wagner's selecting the lawyer to draw up the wills. "I am hurt and dismayed real deeply regarding some of the comments I've heard made," said Wagner, a Democrat also seeking re-election.
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
The daughter of a wealthy Phoenixville developer yesterday accused her younger brother of forging their parents' wills and cheating her out of her full inheritance. Anita Elizabeth Gerhold, 41, of Greenfield, Pa., testified in Chester County Court at the forgery trial of her brother Richard J. Puleo, 34, that their father, Joseph Puleo Sr., had property and other assets valued at more than $4.3 million. In a 1981 will signed by the father, Gerhold said that she, Richard Puleo and two older brothers were made co-executors and shared equally in the estate.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
James F. Proud, Delaware County's register of wills and a solicitor for several area towns, was nominated by Gov. Ridge yesterday to fill a county judgeship left vacant in April. The nomination of the 51-year-old Wallingford Republican is subject to confirmation by the Senate. It comes after five months of chatter in the Delaware County Courthouse about whom the governor would nominate. Proud, often touted as professional and hard-working, was long considered the top choice.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Phoenixville lawyer, charged with drawing up bogus wills for his parents to reduce his sister's inheritance, was acquitted of forgery and related offenses yesterday by a Chester County jury. Richard J. Puleo, 33, the youngest son of a wealthy Phoenixville developer, testified Wednesday that his father, Joseph A. Puleo Sr. and his mother, Lena Puleo, had given him power of attorney to handle their legal affairs. Richard Puleo said he believed that this authority made it legal for him to sign his parents' names to their wills.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Whoever thought that probating wills would be such an attractive job? As the primary nears in Gloucester County, it's the office of surrogate that is getting all of the attention - and is causing the most problems for both political parties. Neither party expected to have a primary contest, but when longtime political figure Donald Wagner announced early this year that he would be retiring from the Surrogate's Office, the field opened wide, prompting both parties to open their coffers and take sides.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The federal government may soon require hospitals and doctors to give patients information on living wills, documents that allow people to stipulate when they want life-support systems turned off. Critics say that the move would result in government-sanctioned mercy killings, but supporters say it would help prevent patients from being kept alive against their wishes. A provision in a deficit-cutting bill approved early Saturday by the Senate Finance Committee would require hospitals and doctors participating in the Medicare program to ask patients if they had signed a living will and to offer information about the wills to interested adults.
NEWS
July 12, 1991 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
It began in 1975, when Joe Quinlan walked into Paul Armstrong's office and told the lawyer he wanted help getting his daughter, Karen Ann, removed from a respirator. That desire, and the New Jersey Supreme Court decision that ultimately allowed it, prompted an international debate on the right to die and spawned the practice of people writing living wills in almost every state in the nation. Yesterday, New Jersey, where the debate began, became the 48th state to legally recognize living wills, the documents that allow people to say in advance what sort of care they want and who should make health-care decisions for them if they become incapacitated.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
FOX 29 TRAFFIC DOYENNE Kacie McDonnell could have a "Bachelorette" for a buddy. As previously reported in this column, McDonnell is dating Aaron Murray , a recently signed quarterback for the Kansas City Chiefs who was previously a star at the University of Georgia. Murray's older brother? That would be former pro baseball player Josh Murray , one of two finalists for the heart of the current "Bachelorette," Andi Dorfman . He was a baseball prospect for the Milwaukee Brewers before joining his brother on the football team at Georgia, where he played safety.
SPORTS
July 29, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - Phillies officials do not believe a long-term rebuilding process is necessary for a team hurtling toward another silent October, but few methods exist to inject young talent. A trade is one. The amateur draft remains the most crucial. The international market is another avenue, although it carries the most risk. That is why it is not surprising to see the Phillies, a team flush with money but no substantial minor-league talent, emerge as suitors for Rusney Castillo. The team will hold a private workout Tuesday with Castillo, a 27-year-old Cuban outfield prospect, according to a source.
SPORTS
July 28, 2014 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
AND ON the third day, Ryan Howard rested. Again. After Howard was held out of the Phillies lineup in each of the two previous games against the San Francisco Giants, manager Ryne Sandberg kept the former MVP in the dugout again last night against lefthander Wade Miley and the Arizona Diamondbacks. Howard appeared to be a little more than unhappy on Thursday afternoon. But yesterday, he was a bit more upbeat as he walked out of the clubhouse before batting practice. The length of his stay out of the lineup is unknown, as Sandberg continues to say he writes out his lineup "on a day-to-day" basis.
NEWS
July 28, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Faye Corman was leading the little boy with the deep brown eyes across the train platform when all of a sudden he stopped, planted his feet, and refused to move. "Come on, Jon Paul," she urged him. No luck. She and her husband had adopted the 3-year-old from China a few months before, and communication was still tricky. There was the language barrier, sure, but also the boy was blind - and always had been, as far as anyone knew. He'd just had a second surgery at Wills Eye Hospital, but the doctors did not hold out much hope that he would see. Suddenly, Jon Paul leaned forward, almost as though he were looking at something - looking?
NEWS
July 28, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey's medical-marijuana program is coming under fire from a group of parents, who are setting up orange traffic cones on a sidewalk in front of the Statehouse each week to make their point, simply and colorfully. The program needs repairs, they say, and Gov. Christie is blocking changes that would help their severely ill children get treatment their doctors have recommended. The cones are intended as a visual reference to Bridgegate. The protests have been held each Thursday this month.
SPORTS
July 24, 2014 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Staff Writer
AMONG THE popular theories accompanying Chip Kelly's release of DeSean Jackson in March, most popular was the premise it was done to establish some type of moral beachhead: That alleged gang involvement, petulance and insubordination induced the NFL coach, a year removed from college, to release a Pro Bowl receiver coming off his best season statistically. Such theories say more about how we view our favorite NFL football team than how Kelly, or most any other successful NFL football coach coaches them.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
THE REV. KEVIN R. Johnson, embattled pastor of Bright Hope Baptist Church, will leave the 103-year-old North Philadelphia church on Oct. 31. Several congregants said Johnson announced from the pulpit yesterday that it was "crystal clear" after a contentious meeting of church leadership Thursday that the time had come for him to depart. "I have enjoyed Philadelphia," Johnson reportedly told the congregation. "But the Lord has told me it is time to move on. " He said that because his wife is "gainfully employed" as a lawyer, he will take his time seeking another pulpit, congregants said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
  STING   isn't the only celebrity not leaving his fortune to his kids. Citing court documents, the New York Post reports that Philip Seymour Hoffman , who died in February of a drug overdose, refused to set aside money for his three children (ages 5, 7 and 10) because he did not want them "to be considered 'trust fund' kids. " Hoffman instead left his estimated $35 million fortune to his children's mother, his longtime girlfriend. According to his accountant, David Friedman , Hoffman believed O'Donnell would "take care of the children," which does seem like a reasonable belief.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania has received a $10 million donation to create a center that aspires to develop new energy policy by reframing the relationship between research and practice. The Kleinman Center for Energy Policy will be named for donor Scott Kleinman and his wife, Wendy. He is a Wall Street private-equity manager and 1994 Penn alum. It will be directed by Mark Alan Hughes, a professor of practice at Penn's School of Design. Hughes was the city's first director of sustainability and is a former adviser to Mayor Nutter.
NEWS
July 17, 2014 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
His body was shaking like never before. Blood poured from a tiny cut between his wrist and his thumb. Moments earlier, around 8 p.m. Monday, David Bodkin-Parris, 14, had run to his friend's car, parked on Ashland Avenue in Glenolden, Delaware County. Thunder echoed around him. Wind shook the trees. Rain pounded the pavement. Then, it struck. "At first, it seemed not real," Bodkin said Tuesday. "I got hit by lightning. " Odds are one in 12,000 that someone will be struck by lightning in his or her lifetime, according to the National Weather Service.
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