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Wills

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NEWS
February 20, 1991 | By Peter Finn, Special to The Inquirer
Eugene Feldman, the Camden County surrogate, was pacing the room and talking with a volubility that defied his subject: death and, more particularly, dying. "Modern technology has done tremendous things for us in keeping us alive," Feldman said. "But in some cases, it has done too good a job. People are tired of not dying. " A wave of assent, like revival amens, rippled from about 20 senior citizens who had gathered to listen to Feldman at the Brendenwood Retirement Community in Voorhees.
NEWS
October 21, 1987 | By Virginia M. Resnik, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteer firefighters in Camden County have the opportunity to have their wills drawn up by a lawyer free of charge under a new program offered through the Camden County Surrogate's Office. For the last two years, the office has run a program offering free wills to senior citizens, according to Gene Feldman, the county surrogate. Under that program, about 3,500 wills have been drawn up. Now, the will service is being offered to volunteer firefighters because they place their lives at risk for the sake of their communities without pay, Feldman said.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloucester County Surrogate Donald H. Wagner harshly criticized Freeholder Jay H. Sharp last night for suggesting that there may be improprieties in the program providing free wills for senior citizens. Sharp, a Republican seeking re-election, said last week that he was concerned about where the funds for the surrogate's program were kept and about the propriety of Wagner's selecting the lawyer to draw up the wills. "I am hurt and dismayed real deeply regarding some of the comments I've heard made," said Wagner, a Democrat also seeking re-election.
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
The daughter of a wealthy Phoenixville developer yesterday accused her younger brother of forging their parents' wills and cheating her out of her full inheritance. Anita Elizabeth Gerhold, 41, of Greenfield, Pa., testified in Chester County Court at the forgery trial of her brother Richard J. Puleo, 34, that their father, Joseph Puleo Sr., had property and other assets valued at more than $4.3 million. In a 1981 will signed by the father, Gerhold said that she, Richard Puleo and two older brothers were made co-executors and shared equally in the estate.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
James F. Proud, Delaware County's register of wills and a solicitor for several area towns, was nominated by Gov. Ridge yesterday to fill a county judgeship left vacant in April. The nomination of the 51-year-old Wallingford Republican is subject to confirmation by the Senate. It comes after five months of chatter in the Delaware County Courthouse about whom the governor would nominate. Proud, often touted as professional and hard-working, was long considered the top choice.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Phoenixville lawyer, charged with drawing up bogus wills for his parents to reduce his sister's inheritance, was acquitted of forgery and related offenses yesterday by a Chester County jury. Richard J. Puleo, 33, the youngest son of a wealthy Phoenixville developer, testified Wednesday that his father, Joseph A. Puleo Sr. and his mother, Lena Puleo, had given him power of attorney to handle their legal affairs. Richard Puleo said he believed that this authority made it legal for him to sign his parents' names to their wills.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Whoever thought that probating wills would be such an attractive job? As the primary nears in Gloucester County, it's the office of surrogate that is getting all of the attention - and is causing the most problems for both political parties. Neither party expected to have a primary contest, but when longtime political figure Donald Wagner announced early this year that he would be retiring from the Surrogate's Office, the field opened wide, prompting both parties to open their coffers and take sides.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The federal government may soon require hospitals and doctors to give patients information on living wills, documents that allow people to stipulate when they want life-support systems turned off. Critics say that the move would result in government-sanctioned mercy killings, but supporters say it would help prevent patients from being kept alive against their wishes. A provision in a deficit-cutting bill approved early Saturday by the Senate Finance Committee would require hospitals and doctors participating in the Medicare program to ask patients if they had signed a living will and to offer information about the wills to interested adults.
NEWS
July 12, 1991 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
It began in 1975, when Joe Quinlan walked into Paul Armstrong's office and told the lawyer he wanted help getting his daughter, Karen Ann, removed from a respirator. That desire, and the New Jersey Supreme Court decision that ultimately allowed it, prompted an international debate on the right to die and spawned the practice of people writing living wills in almost every state in the nation. Yesterday, New Jersey, where the debate began, became the 48th state to legally recognize living wills, the documents that allow people to say in advance what sort of care they want and who should make health-care decisions for them if they become incapacitated.
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SPORTS
October 28, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Flyers coach Craig Berube said he was undecided on whether Steve Mason or Ray Emery would be his starting goalie Tuesday against the visiting Los Angeles Kings. "I'm going to sleep on it tonight and see what happens," Berube said after practice Monday in Voorhees. Emery, who has started the last two games, came out early for practice, usually an indication that he would start the next game. Emery is 3-0-1 with a 2.60 goals-against average and a .914 save percentage, and he keyed Saturday's 4-2 win over Detroit.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
      Races to fill the seats of two retiring lawmakers in the Philadelphia suburbs are among the most competitive campaigns for the Pennsylvania House this fall. Those races, in Bucks and Delaware Counties, could indicate whether gains in voter registration for Democrats will translate into campaign victories, analysts say. Though there are only a handful of close House races this fall, "a lion's share of them are right around the Philadelphia suburbs," said Chris Borick, a pollster and political scientist at Muhlenberg College.
SPORTS
October 27, 2014 | By Ed Rendell, For the Daily News
AFTER TODAY'S games, the College Football Playoff Selection Committee will make its first rankings, and, on Tuesday night, we fans will get our first inkling at what the four-team playoff system might look like. This is an improvement over the BCS, which chose two teams to play for the national championship, but it simply isn't fair and won't solve the controversy. Let's assume the college football season plays out as like this . . . * Florida State runs the table and wins the ACC playoff and finishes 13-0.
SPORTS
October 27, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Since football, or more precisely football-viewing, is overwhelmingly the favorite pastime of 21st-century Americans, it's no surprise that it too has become a polarizing subject. Those who love the sport subscribe to a heroic narrative: It's a colorful, compelling, athletic spectacle, one whose participants embody the virtues of teamwork, strength, and dedication. Others see football as a militaristic farce. Its coaches are egomaniacal martinets. Its players are incurious lemmings.
NEWS
October 25, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 182 students whose ACT exams, taken at Upper Darby High School, were apparently lost in the mail will get a second chance to prove themselves. ACT Inc. will allow the students a free retest Nov. 1, this time at Penn Wood High School in Lansdowne. All 182 students also will receive a refund for the tests that were lost, Ed Colby, a spokesman for the Iowa-based testing company, said Thursday. Colby said ACT continues to look for the exams, supposedly mailed Sept. 15 by an ACT-hired testing coordinator.
SPORTS
October 24, 2014 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Basketball, wrestling, and indoor track teams in the Colonial Conference and Cape-Atlantic League will be able to start practice on Nov. 24. The same likely will be true for many teams in the Burlington County Scholastic League. But teams in the Olympic Conference will have to wait a week and won't be able to start the winter season until Dec. 1. That staggered start is a result of a decision made by the Olympic Conference to overrule a pilot program established by the NJSIAA in September to allow boys' and girls' basketball teams to start practice on the Monday before Thanksgiving.
SPORTS
October 24, 2014 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
PAT SHURMUR was asked yesterday about crowd noise in Arizona's domed stadium affecting his center, David Molk, whose start Sunday will be Molk's fourth in the NFL - and maybe his last, given Jason Kelce's pending return from groin surgery. Shurmur said crowd noise wasn't his biggest worry, in this matchup of 5-1 NFC teams. "The challenge this week for our center is the multiple looks that we face from the Arizona defense," the Eagles' offensive coordinator said. "They do a lot of different things to try and create pressure.
SPORTS
October 24, 2014 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
DETROIT - It is the part of coaching that coaches hate most: Cut day. It will be coming by Monday for the Sixers, and head man Brett Brown is no different in his ill feelings. It is a little different with this group, however, in that after a select few there really aren't many players who are going to make a difference on the team this season or in the future. Brown and general manager Sam Hinkie often talk of "finding keepers," but that just doesn't to seem to be the case with this group.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
A $253 million bond offering planned for this week by the New Jersey Casino Reinvestment Development Authority includes $60 million that will be paid to Pitney Bowes Inc. for a settlement linked to a renovation of Atlantic City's Boardwalk Hall that started in 1998. New Jersey and Pitney Bowes, of Stamford, Conn., formed a partnership in 2000 to take advantage of federal historic building rehabilitation tax credits in connection with the project at the Boardwalk complex that hosts the Miss America pageant.
SPORTS
October 22, 2014 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
TODAY, JUST as they did last year, the Eagles return from their bye looking toward a date with the Arizona Cardinals. Some things are the same, many things are different for two NFC teams that finished 10-6 last year, the Eagles winning a weak NFC East, the Cards shut out of the playoffs in the powerful NFC West. Had Arizona beaten the Birds last Dec. 1, instead of getting nipped, 24-21, after coming back from a 24-7 second-half deficit, the Cards would have gone to the 2013 playoffs.
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