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Wills

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NEWS
February 20, 1991 | By Peter Finn, Special to The Inquirer
Eugene Feldman, the Camden County surrogate, was pacing the room and talking with a volubility that defied his subject: death and, more particularly, dying. "Modern technology has done tremendous things for us in keeping us alive," Feldman said. "But in some cases, it has done too good a job. People are tired of not dying. " A wave of assent, like revival amens, rippled from about 20 senior citizens who had gathered to listen to Feldman at the Brendenwood Retirement Community in Voorhees.
NEWS
October 21, 1987 | By Virginia M. Resnik, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteer firefighters in Camden County have the opportunity to have their wills drawn up by a lawyer free of charge under a new program offered through the Camden County Surrogate's Office. For the last two years, the office has run a program offering free wills to senior citizens, according to Gene Feldman, the county surrogate. Under that program, about 3,500 wills have been drawn up. Now, the will service is being offered to volunteer firefighters because they place their lives at risk for the sake of their communities without pay, Feldman said.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloucester County Surrogate Donald H. Wagner harshly criticized Freeholder Jay H. Sharp last night for suggesting that there may be improprieties in the program providing free wills for senior citizens. Sharp, a Republican seeking re-election, said last week that he was concerned about where the funds for the surrogate's program were kept and about the propriety of Wagner's selecting the lawyer to draw up the wills. "I am hurt and dismayed real deeply regarding some of the comments I've heard made," said Wagner, a Democrat also seeking re-election.
NEWS
July 17, 2015
J OSEPH DOUGHERTY, the 73-year-old former labor leader awaiting sentencing next week on a federal racketeering conviction, just found out the hard way that not even Shakespeare can soften the blow of a judge's gavel. U.S. District Judge Michael Baylson yesterday rejected Dougherty's Hail Mary motion for an acquittal or a new trial. Baylson began the ruling thusly: "Who finds the heifer dead and bleeding fresh, And sees fast by a butcher with an axe, But will suspect 'twas he that made the slaughter?"
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
The daughter of a wealthy Phoenixville developer yesterday accused her younger brother of forging their parents' wills and cheating her out of her full inheritance. Anita Elizabeth Gerhold, 41, of Greenfield, Pa., testified in Chester County Court at the forgery trial of her brother Richard J. Puleo, 34, that their father, Joseph Puleo Sr., had property and other assets valued at more than $4.3 million. In a 1981 will signed by the father, Gerhold said that she, Richard Puleo and two older brothers were made co-executors and shared equally in the estate.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Phoenixville lawyer, charged with drawing up bogus wills for his parents to reduce his sister's inheritance, was acquitted of forgery and related offenses yesterday by a Chester County jury. Richard J. Puleo, 33, the youngest son of a wealthy Phoenixville developer, testified Wednesday that his father, Joseph A. Puleo Sr. and his mother, Lena Puleo, had given him power of attorney to handle their legal affairs. Richard Puleo said he believed that this authority made it legal for him to sign his parents' names to their wills.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
James F. Proud, Delaware County's register of wills and a solicitor for several area towns, was nominated by Gov. Ridge yesterday to fill a county judgeship left vacant in April. The nomination of the 51-year-old Wallingford Republican is subject to confirmation by the Senate. It comes after five months of chatter in the Delaware County Courthouse about whom the governor would nominate. Proud, often touted as professional and hard-working, was long considered the top choice.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Whoever thought that probating wills would be such an attractive job? As the primary nears in Gloucester County, it's the office of surrogate that is getting all of the attention - and is causing the most problems for both political parties. Neither party expected to have a primary contest, but when longtime political figure Donald Wagner announced early this year that he would be retiring from the Surrogate's Office, the field opened wide, prompting both parties to open their coffers and take sides.
NEWS
July 1, 2016
ISSUE | CAMPAIGN 2016 A battle of wills Stalwart conservative columnist George Will announced that he has left the Republican Party because of presumptive presidential nominee Donald Trump, stating, "This is not my party" ("George Will leaves GOP over Trump," Sunday). Instead of trying to convince Will of the error of his ways, Trump wrote on Twitter that Will is "one of the most overrated political pundits (who lost his way long ago). . . . He's made many bad calls. " Folks ought to be growing weary of this shtick, which Trump appears compelled to repeat ad nauseam.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The federal government may soon require hospitals and doctors to give patients information on living wills, documents that allow people to stipulate when they want life-support systems turned off. Critics say that the move would result in government-sanctioned mercy killings, but supporters say it would help prevent patients from being kept alive against their wishes. A provision in a deficit-cutting bill approved early Saturday by the Senate Finance Committee would require hospitals and doctors participating in the Medicare program to ask patients if they had signed a living will and to offer information about the wills to interested adults.
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SPORTS
September 19, 2016 | By Zach Berman, STAFF WRITER
Malcolm Jenkins did not yet know what he will do during the national anthem Monday night before the game against the Chicago Bears, but the Eagles safety plans to make some type of demonstration. He ruled out kneeling and locking arms. He does not know how many teammates will join him. And he expects to make the demonstration every week this season. Jenkins, who is one of the more socially aware Eagles, closely followed how players from other teams made gestures during the national anthem last week to raise awareness of racial injustice.
SPORTS
September 19, 2016 | By Keith Pompey, STAFF WRITER
Midway through his annual preseason media luncheon, Brett Brown was asked his expectations for the season. While the 76ers coach declined to disclose how many wins he expects, he revealed that this season will be sort of like the previous three - minus the tanking. "The difference is everybody is going to want to win some games," the fourth-year coach said Thursday in the second-floor dining room of Lo Spiedo at the Navy Yard. "Let's call it for what it is. I feel like that we are going to want to see growth on the court as it relates to wins.
SPORTS
September 19, 2016 | Mike Jensen, STAFF WRITER
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - Third quarter, Penn State up a couple of touchdowns, the big screen showed images that brought many inside Beaver Stadium to their feet. A familiar face in younger days, glorious days. Words were mentioned over the PA: "Success without honor is an unseasoned dish. It will satisfy your hunger, but it won't taste good. " In the last row of the Temple section in the upper deck above the north end zone, a banner appeared, with a big T for Temple, so there was no mistaking the allegiance of the artist, who wrote, "He turned his back, so we'll turn ours.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
A band played last Friday evening as guests mingled on the sidewalk over hors d'oeuvres, then took seats in the street at long tables laid with hand-printed placemats, below strings of festive lights. It could've been mistaken for the city's latest pop-up beer garden - but this was American Street, the five-lane, industrial artery at the frontier of gentrification pushing west from Fishtown and north from Northern Liberties. Normally, the street isn't much to look at: Vacant lots sprout high weeds and chain link.
SPORTS
September 17, 2016 | By Phil Anastasia, STAFF WRITER
George Vyzaniaris knows the outside perception of the Cherry Hill West football team. "People have the view that we're a team that always has potential but never puts it together," said Vyzaniaris, a senior two-way lineman for the Lions. Cherry Hill West has hovered around the .500 mark for much of the last decade - 4-6 in 2015, 4-5 in 2014, 5-5 in 2013, 4-6 in 2012, 5-5 in 2009. Vyzaniaris and his teammates, especially the 10 or so seniors who have been together since youth football, believe this is the season for the Lions' big breakthrough.
NEWS
September 16, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Staff Writer
It isn't every day, as Josh O'Neill put it, that you have an opportunity to publish work that shows something akin to a "teenage Shakespeare becoming Shakespeare. " But that's what O'Neill's Locust Moon Press in West Philadelphia believes it is doing. This week, Locust Moon officially brings out The Lost Work of Will Eisner , a 70-page compendium of the legendary cartoonist's very early work, much of it never seen before. For those unfamiliar with Eisner, who died in 2005, legendary is not a word used lightly here.
SPORTS
September 15, 2016 | By Marc Narducci, STAFF WRITER
The consensus on the Temple football team is that the 1-1 Owls aren't anywhere near where they need to be if they hope to approach the success they had last season. One person in particular who believes he needs to step up is quarterback Phillip Walker. The 5-foot-11, 205-pound senior has even more responsibility than a year ago, when strong senior leadership and production from the upperclassmen resulted in a 10-4 finish. This year's team is still feeling its way, looking for leaders and big-play performers to emerge.
SPORTS
September 14, 2016 | By Marc Narducci, STAFF WRITER
Temple coach Matt Rhule says he doesn't know about the availability of all-American Athletic Conference running back Jahad Thomas for Saturday's game at Penn State. Thomas has missed the first two games with a dislocated thumb. "We are not sure," Rhule said Monday during a conference call with AAC coaches. "We will see if he is able to practice [Tuesday]. " A senior, Thomas rushed for 1,262 yards and 17 touchdowns last season. During last year's opening 27-10 win over Penn State, Thomas rushed for 135 yards and two touchdowns on 29 carries.
NEWS
September 14, 2016
By John G. Malcolm and Tiffany H. Bates Few presidential elections have featured federal court judges among their top five issues. The Supreme Court's odious decision in the Dred Scott case was a central theme in the 1860 race between Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas. And the Warren Court was front and center in the 1968 faceoff between Richard Nixon and Hubert Humphrey. This may well be another such year. Court-related issues far beyond who will fill the vacancy created by the unexpected death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia loom large.
SPORTS
September 14, 2016 | By Matt Gelb, STAFF WRITER
A manager, two coaches, and a veteran catcher gathered near home plate about four hours before Monday's game to watch Jorge Alfaro. The 23-year-old catching prospect fired again and again to second base in a pregame drill, showing an arm that is regarded as one of the best in the minors. On Tuesday, Alfaro will have a chance to use it in a major-league game. He will catch Alec Asher, in what should be the first of a few opportunities for the Colombian catcher this September. The Phillies have 18 games remaining after Monday.
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