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Wills

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NEWS
February 20, 1991 | By Peter Finn, Special to The Inquirer
Eugene Feldman, the Camden County surrogate, was pacing the room and talking with a volubility that defied his subject: death and, more particularly, dying. "Modern technology has done tremendous things for us in keeping us alive," Feldman said. "But in some cases, it has done too good a job. People are tired of not dying. " A wave of assent, like revival amens, rippled from about 20 senior citizens who had gathered to listen to Feldman at the Brendenwood Retirement Community in Voorhees.
NEWS
October 21, 1987 | By Virginia M. Resnik, Special to The Inquirer
Volunteer firefighters in Camden County have the opportunity to have their wills drawn up by a lawyer free of charge under a new program offered through the Camden County Surrogate's Office. For the last two years, the office has run a program offering free wills to senior citizens, according to Gene Feldman, the county surrogate. Under that program, about 3,500 wills have been drawn up. Now, the will service is being offered to volunteer firefighters because they place their lives at risk for the sake of their communities without pay, Feldman said.
NEWS
July 17, 2015
J OSEPH DOUGHERTY, the 73-year-old former labor leader awaiting sentencing next week on a federal racketeering conviction, just found out the hard way that not even Shakespeare can soften the blow of a judge's gavel. U.S. District Judge Michael Baylson yesterday rejected Dougherty's Hail Mary motion for an acquittal or a new trial. Baylson began the ruling thusly: "Who finds the heifer dead and bleeding fresh, And sees fast by a butcher with an axe, But will suspect 'twas he that made the slaughter?"
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloucester County Surrogate Donald H. Wagner harshly criticized Freeholder Jay H. Sharp last night for suggesting that there may be improprieties in the program providing free wills for senior citizens. Sharp, a Republican seeking re-election, said last week that he was concerned about where the funds for the surrogate's program were kept and about the propriety of Wagner's selecting the lawyer to draw up the wills. "I am hurt and dismayed real deeply regarding some of the comments I've heard made," said Wagner, a Democrat also seeking re-election.
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
The daughter of a wealthy Phoenixville developer yesterday accused her younger brother of forging their parents' wills and cheating her out of her full inheritance. Anita Elizabeth Gerhold, 41, of Greenfield, Pa., testified in Chester County Court at the forgery trial of her brother Richard J. Puleo, 34, that their father, Joseph Puleo Sr., had property and other assets valued at more than $4.3 million. In a 1981 will signed by the father, Gerhold said that she, Richard Puleo and two older brothers were made co-executors and shared equally in the estate.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
James F. Proud, Delaware County's register of wills and a solicitor for several area towns, was nominated by Gov. Ridge yesterday to fill a county judgeship left vacant in April. The nomination of the 51-year-old Wallingford Republican is subject to confirmation by the Senate. It comes after five months of chatter in the Delaware County Courthouse about whom the governor would nominate. Proud, often touted as professional and hard-working, was long considered the top choice.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Phoenixville lawyer, charged with drawing up bogus wills for his parents to reduce his sister's inheritance, was acquitted of forgery and related offenses yesterday by a Chester County jury. Richard J. Puleo, 33, the youngest son of a wealthy Phoenixville developer, testified Wednesday that his father, Joseph A. Puleo Sr. and his mother, Lena Puleo, had given him power of attorney to handle their legal affairs. Richard Puleo said he believed that this authority made it legal for him to sign his parents' names to their wills.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Whoever thought that probating wills would be such an attractive job? As the primary nears in Gloucester County, it's the office of surrogate that is getting all of the attention - and is causing the most problems for both political parties. Neither party expected to have a primary contest, but when longtime political figure Donald Wagner announced early this year that he would be retiring from the Surrogate's Office, the field opened wide, prompting both parties to open their coffers and take sides.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The federal government may soon require hospitals and doctors to give patients information on living wills, documents that allow people to stipulate when they want life-support systems turned off. Critics say that the move would result in government-sanctioned mercy killings, but supporters say it would help prevent patients from being kept alive against their wishes. A provision in a deficit-cutting bill approved early Saturday by the Senate Finance Committee would require hospitals and doctors participating in the Medicare program to ask patients if they had signed a living will and to offer information about the wills to interested adults.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 27, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A JUDGE YESTERDAY told the attorney for the demolition contractor facing homicide charges in the deadly Salvation Army building collapse two years ago that the contractor's trial will not be about any other entity or person. "I agree with the commonwealth. You may not attempt to put on trial other entities because that does not mitigate" your client's case, Common Pleas Judge Glenn Bronson told defense attorney William Hobson, who represents demolition contractor Griffin Campbell. "The fact other people could be criminally or civilly culpable is not a defense" for Campbell, the judge said during a motions hearing.
NEWS
July 27, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Boxed wines have come a long way over the last decade in variety, image, and quality, joining the screwcap as a once-controversial technical innovation that's now widely appreciated for its worth. The bag-in-a-box format is smart for fresh young wines, and the air-tight bag's prevention of oxygen damage maintains freshness for weeks after opening. It's also the most cost-effective and earth-friendly way to bring three liters of vino (that's four bottles) to a party. Choosing the right one, though, is tricky, as many boxed wines are still plonkers.
SPORTS
July 27, 2015 | By Jake Kaplan, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHICAGO - The moment Pat Gillick and Ruben Amaro Jr. opted against an offseason trade of Cole Hamels, this coming week was all but sealed as the most important of the Phillies' 2015 season. Now it's here, and it comes fresh off Hamels' first career no-hitter. The ace's future with his longtime team hangs in the balance, as the front office triumvirate of team president Gillick, general manager Amaro, and incoming president Andy MacPhail weigh a potentially franchise-altering decision.
NEWS
July 26, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1981, a Genuardi's supermarket opened in Chesterbrook, anchoring a shopping plaza that helped define the sprawling Chester County development as a cutting-edge planned community. Three decades later, the shine was off. Three quarters of the plaza was vacant, and the supermarket was an abandoned shell. On Tuesday, the former Genuardi's building is set to fall. Its demolition marks the first swing in an $85 million plan to remake the 34-year-old plaza. When it ends, Chesterbrook Village Shopping Center is expected to sprout 123 new townhouses around a 30,000-square-foot retail strip.
SPORTS
July 26, 2015 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
CHICAGO - The trade deadline can make people a little nutty, including overheated sports writers, so Chicago Cubs manager Joe Maddon wore a catcher's mask to his pregame news conference yesterday afternoon at Wrigley Field. "I heard things got a little testy today," Maddon said. That might also be the best adjective to describe the feelings of Cole Hamels (and Jonathan Papelbon) if they're still on the Phillies roster a week from today. The trade deadline (finally) arrives at 4 p.m. Friday.
SPORTS
July 25, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple will open its nonconference basketball schedule with a perennial NCAA tournament team and end it with another. Also on the schedule is a game with last year's NCAA finalist. The Owls announced their 12-game nonconference schedule, which begins with a Nov. 13 meeting against North Carolina at Navy. Temple's final nonconference game is Feb. 17 in a Big Five matchup against Villanova. Temple will visit NCAA runner-up Wisconsin on Dec. 5. The Owls will compete in the eight-team Puerto Rico Tip-Off.
SPORTS
July 25, 2015 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
The Eagles begin training camp a week from Sunday, so here's a question: How do you solve a problem like Sam Bradford? By acquiring Bradford from the St. Louis Rams in March - even though he'd torn his left ACL twice in 10 months and hasn't suited up in a regular-season NFL game since October 2013 - the Eagles would seem to have put themselves in a position only Joseph Heller could appreciate. Bradford will earn $13 million this season, the last in the six-year, $78 million contract he signed after the Rams made him the No. 1 pick in the 2010 draft, and as an NFL Network report earlier this week reaffirmed, he has no interest in signing an extension with the Eagles anytime soon.
NEWS
July 23, 2015 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
THE SALE OF regional rail passes for the weekend of Pope Francis' visit will not resume this week, after the site for pass sales crashed when it went live on Monday due to high volume, SEPTA announced yesterday. In a statement, SEPTA spokesman Andrew Busch said the agency is still considering how best to address the overwhelming demand for the papal passes. Within the first minute of launch, about 54,000 people visited SEPTA's papal pass site. When the site was shut down, more than an hour later, 64,000 people were still trying to buy passes.
SPORTS
July 22, 2015 | BY TOM REIFSNYDER, Daily News Staff Writer
LAST TIME the Union traveled to Red Bull Arena in Harrison, N.J., on May 24, the team came home with its first win in seven tries on New York's home turf, largely thanks to second-half goals from midfielder Vincent Noguiera and leading scorer C.J. Sapong. Sapong leads the team with six goals, but he won't be adding to that tally in today's U.S. Open Cup quarterfinal matchup at 4 p.m. against the host Red Bulls, after picking up a red card against D.C. United in the previous Open Cup game.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2015
A FEW WEEKS ago, in this very space, I laid my pride aside and revealed a part of me that I never thought I'd have the guts to write about. I did have the guts, however. In fact, I had so much guts it had developed into dad bod. What's dad bod, you ask? Clemson sophomore Mackenzie Pearson, in her college magazine, The Odyssey , explained it this way: "The dad bod is a nice balance between a beer gut and working out. The dad bod says, 'I go to the gym occasionally, but I also drink heavily on the weekends and enjoy eating eight slices of pizza at a time.' " While rejoicing that my dad bod would never again play second fiddle to Kim Kardashian's butt on Instagram, I explained that I achieved my dad bod with cheesesteaks, one succulent bite at a time.
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