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Wills Eye Hospital

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BUSINESS
December 24, 1990 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wills Eye Hospital, which for 159 years has traded on its reputation for sophisticated eye care, is adding a new service: psychiatry. The hospital, at Ninth and Walnut Streets, is joining with a longtime affiliate, Thomas Jefferson University, to open a 30-bed unit for treating elderly patients with psychiatric problems. Wills personnel will operate the unit and provide nurses and other support personnel. Jefferson doctors will direct the professional services. The development is not quite as unusual as it seems, says the specialty hospital's executive director, D. McWilliams Kessler.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2000 | By Andrea Knox, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a medical minuet at Ninth and Walnut Streets, Wills Eye Hospital has sold its building to Thomas Jefferson University, and will build a new medical center across the street atop the Walnut Towers office building and parking garage. The existing Wills Eye building is on the southwest corner of Ninth and Walnut Streets, and Walnut Towers is on the southeast. The $29.5 million sale, which has been in the works for a year, was completed yesterday, the hospitals said. No immediate changes will occur.
NEWS
July 11, 2016 | By Dawn Fallik, For The Inquirer
Rose Carvalho had not been to her doctor for a while. Then she got a letter asking whether she would be interested in a free eye exam - at her primary-care doctor's office. It was good timing because she had noticed changes in her night vision and had trouble reading the guide on the TV screen. The former social services worker saw a Wills Eye Hospital doctor who made the trip from the Center City institution to Spectrum Health Center in West Philadelphia for the exam, part of federally funded research aimed at lowering barriers to care.
NEWS
March 1, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
"It's mental," said one of the bridesmaids in the wedding where The Dress was worn. Lindsay Maden, of Blackpool, England, was referring to the sheer nuttiness of the worldwide debate over the color of a piece of fabric. But she was also correct from a scientific perspective. It is all in the brain. The garment in question, in case you have not been near a smartphone or computer in a day or two, is a blue-and-black dress that, to many people, unquestionably appears white and gold in a photo posted on the social networking site Tumblr.
NEWS
July 9, 2016
By Thomas Leibrandt In an unfortunate accident, Matt Imhof, a 22-year-old Phillies minor-league pitcher had his right eye damaged when the mounted base of a resistance band in the exercise room broke off and hit him in the eye and nose. The damaged eye was removed and replaced with a prosthetic one. Trauma is a leading cause of monocular blindness in the United States. Traumatic eye loss has both physical and emotional aspects. Monocular blindness reduces peripheral vision by about 25 percent; depth perception can be affected.
NEWS
May 21, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Fox 29 reporter and anchor Chris O'Connell was alarmed to wake up Jan. 12 with blurry vision in his left eye. Nearly two months later, after Wills Eye Hospital physicians figured out what caused the problem, he was glad it happened. Turned out O'Connell had two undiagnosed heart defects, one of which probably led to a clot that blocked the blood supply to the optic nerve and retina in that eye. "In the beginning, I thought it was a devastating diagnosis," O'Connell said. "As I learned what exactly happened to me and why it happened, I felt almost like it was a blessing.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Wills Eye Hospital, which said last month that it is trying to raise $30 million for a new research and medical-care facility, on Monday announced the hiring of Leslie G. Hyman to spearhead the expansion of the hospital's research program. Hyman, currently a head of the epidemiology faculty and professor at Stony Brook University Medical Center in Stony Brook, New York, is scheduled to start at Wills this summer, Will said. In addition to the job at Wills, she will hold the Thomas D. Duane Endowed Chair in the Department of Ophthalmology at the Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University and will become co-director of the Wills Vision Research Center at Jefferson.
NEWS
August 1, 1986 | By Monica Gonzales, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 4-year-old Delran girl, who suffered a case of pinkeye that scarred the tissue in her left eye last winter, may lose sight in that eye if she does not receive a cornea transplant. The girl, Tiffany Altschul, needs a cornea from a donor 3 to 6 years old, said her mother, Mary Ann Altschul. The Burlington County girl was taken last week to Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia, where she was put on a waiting list for cornea donations. Altschul has been told by doctors that her daughter will have to wait four months to a year before receiving a cornea.
NEWS
March 11, 1994 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Dr. Frederick B. Frisch Jr., 76, an ophthalmic surgeon associated with Wills Eye Hospital and Scheie Eye Institute in Philadelphia as well as hospitals at the South Jersey Shore, died Saturday at Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia. A Ventnor resident, Dr. Frisch was an assistant surgeon with Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia from 1949 to 1983. He was associated with Atlantic City Medical Center, and was a former director of ophthalmology at Shore Memorial Hospital in Somers Point.
NEWS
October 16, 1992 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Harold Douglas Barnshaw, 87, former chief of ophthalmology at Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center in Camden and former medical staff president at both Cooper and Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia, died Monday at The Cadbury in Cherry Hill. Dr. Barnshaw "was truly a physician of the old school," said George Hare, head of geriatrics at Cooper and long a friend and colleague. "He loved his patients and medicine. " After retiring in 1981, he did volunteer work at Cooper, said Dr. Hare.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 18, 2016
Robert M. Kelley is an Inquirer editor They tell you to "keep your eye on the ball," and for some of us - namely, me, and now Phillies pitching prospect Matt Imhof - the singular is correct. Imhof recently lost an eye in a training accident, and he intends to go ahead with his quest to join the Phillies' pitching roster. The lack of depth perception that comes with losing your binocular vision might make it hard to gauge when to swing at a pitch, but you can still throw your own pitches over the plate accurately.
NEWS
July 11, 2016 | By Dawn Fallik, For The Inquirer
Rose Carvalho had not been to her doctor for a while. Then she got a letter asking whether she would be interested in a free eye exam - at her primary-care doctor's office. It was good timing because she had noticed changes in her night vision and had trouble reading the guide on the TV screen. The former social services worker saw a Wills Eye Hospital doctor who made the trip from the Center City institution to Spectrum Health Center in West Philadelphia for the exam, part of federally funded research aimed at lowering barriers to care.
NEWS
July 9, 2016
By Thomas Leibrandt In an unfortunate accident, Matt Imhof, a 22-year-old Phillies minor-league pitcher had his right eye damaged when the mounted base of a resistance band in the exercise room broke off and hit him in the eye and nose. The damaged eye was removed and replaced with a prosthetic one. Trauma is a leading cause of monocular blindness in the United States. Traumatic eye loss has both physical and emotional aspects. Monocular blindness reduces peripheral vision by about 25 percent; depth perception can be affected.
NEWS
May 21, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Fox 29 reporter and anchor Chris O'Connell was alarmed to wake up Jan. 12 with blurry vision in his left eye. Nearly two months later, after Wills Eye Hospital physicians figured out what caused the problem, he was glad it happened. Turned out O'Connell had two undiagnosed heart defects, one of which probably led to a clot that blocked the blood supply to the optic nerve and retina in that eye. "In the beginning, I thought it was a devastating diagnosis," O'Connell said. "As I learned what exactly happened to me and why it happened, I felt almost like it was a blessing.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Wills Eye Hospital, which said last month that it is trying to raise $30 million for a new research and medical-care facility, on Monday announced the hiring of Leslie G. Hyman to spearhead the expansion of the hospital's research program. Hyman, currently a head of the epidemiology faculty and professor at Stony Brook University Medical Center in Stony Brook, New York, is scheduled to start at Wills this summer, Will said. In addition to the job at Wills, she will hold the Thomas D. Duane Endowed Chair in the Department of Ophthalmology at the Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University and will become co-director of the Wills Vision Research Center at Jefferson.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
Wills Eye Hospital is talking to donors about raising money to expand its Center City campus with a new research and medical-care facility that would replace a strip of vacant houses and an empty lot. The eye-care hospital is seeking to raise at least $30 million to build the new facility on South Ninth Street properties beside its main building at Walnut Street, chief executive officer Joseph P. Bilson said in a statement. "This area has become a very vibrant center for health care and academic medicine," Bilson said.
NEWS
December 27, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Mark H. Blecher has not yet had cataract surgery himself. But the cataract and refractive surgeon has been doing the procedure on others for 30 years, during which the safety and the outcomes have improved dramatically. So at whatever point Blecher does need cataract surgery - as many do - he's "looking forward to the time when I can replace my failing lenses with superior technology. " Blecher, co-chief of cataract and primary eye service at Wills Eye Hospital, recently spoke to us about cataract surgery today, and what's in store.
NEWS
November 30, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A MAN WHO WAS seen throwing a trash can and other furniture out of upper-floor windows of Wills Eye Hospital in Center City early Wednesday has not been charged, a police spokeswoman said yesterday. Officer Christine O'Brien said that after the man was taken into custody Wednesday, he was taken to a mental-health center for a psychiatric evaluation. She did not know if he was still at the mental-health center yesterday or what his relationship was to Wills Eye, on Walnut Street near 9th. It was about 2 a.m. Wednesday when a security officer at Jefferson Hospital for Neuroscience, across from Wills Eye, saw a man throw a trash can out of a ninth-floor window of the eye hospital.
NEWS
November 25, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
Someone apparently wreaked havoc at Wills Eye Hospital overnight. At about 2 a.m. Wednesday, a man tossed a trash can out of a ninth-floor window of the eye hospital, on Walnut Street near 9th in Center City, a Philadelphia Police spokeswoman said. A security officer who was outside at the Jefferson Hospital for Neuroscience building, across the street, saw the man after first hearing banging. The security officer then saw the man throw other items out of other windows, all of which landed on the 800 block of Walnut Street, police said.
NEWS
November 1, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Three years ago, Allison Turner noticed her vision was getting a little blurry. "I knew I had to see a doctor," she said. "But I was scared and didn't deal with it. " The result was that when Turner, a professor of public policy and administration at West Chester University, awoke one morning, she couldn't see out of her left eye. A trip to a retina specialist confirmed she had suffered a detached retina caused by diabetic retinopathy....
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