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Wilson Goode

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NEWS
May 10, 2004
CITY COUNCIL is scheduled to hold hearings today on the budget and a raft of sweeping tax reform bills. How ready is Council? The Daily News asked all 17 members the following question: 1Have you read the 500-page Tax Reform Commission report, which explains the need for each tax reform bill now before City Council? (The report was released in November.) 2Will you support all or some of the 13 tax reform bills put forth by the Tax Reform Commission? 1Yes, absolutely.
NEWS
January 17, 2011 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
W. Wilson Goode is on the pulpit of Zion Baptist Church at Broad and Venango, fidgeting with his BlackBerry. It is a familiar place for Goode, filled with sympathetic and longtime allies, a place where his famously stiff delivery can give way to an only slightly awkward Baptist preacher's brimstone. A place where, at 72, he can flap his arms and do a little hop and wipe sweat from his brow and tell stories of how a woman with a spoon in the dirt ended up building an entire church.
NEWS
January 3, 1992
Wilson Goode is a good man. Philadelphians can confidently expect him to continue to contribute to our city in his new role as private citizen. We may be blessed with our own local version of Jimmy Carter, who has become a nearly revered figure after leaving the presidency. The parallel with Carter runs deep. Like Carter, Goode is a deeply religious man. Like Carter, his lack of political skill and effectiveness cost him dearly. Like Carter, he seemed to believe that people would do the right thing simply because it was the right thing.
NEWS
October 25, 1987
W. Wilson Goode swept into office four years ago on a tide of good will. He had served ably as managing director in the Green administration, bested former Mayor Frank Rizzo in a 1983 primary that was free of the race-baiting that infected big-city elections elsewhere and won broad support - including more than 20 percent of the white vote - by projecting a button-down, no- nonsense, professional image. He stands for election to a second term considerably diminished. The MOVE bombing in 1985 mocked his promise of hands-on management; the trash crisis is still growing and is as urgent and unresolved as the day he took charge in City Hall.
NEWS
January 21, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
MELVIN ELLIS was good at keeping secrets. A 35-year veteran of the Philadelphia Police Department, Melvin worked for many years as both a bodyguard and personal investigator for former Mayor W. Wilson Goode. What did he actually do for Goode? That was between him and the mayor. He didn't even tell his wife. He also worked with Sen. Edward Kennedy and Frank Sinatra. What did he do for them? He'd never tell. "That was why he was in such demand," said his wife, the former Suzanne Malseed.
NEWS
September 20, 1992 | By Craig R. McCoy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was to be the book that let Philadelphia see the man behind that stolid, methodical and guarded presence. A man who once stuttered so badly that counting to 10 was agony. A man born in poverty and bitter circumstance who turned his escapist daydreams of fame into reality. Yet as somehow seems to happen in the life of W. Wilson Goode, things somehow went awry along the way. The news of the very real and intimate disclosures in the former mayor's new autobiography, In Goode Faith, was lost last week amid the clamor over - what else?
NEWS
June 25, 1996 | By Suzanne Sataline, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The man who presided over the 1985 MOVE disaster says yesterday's jury verdict contained a message - not for him, but for the people he once served: Philadelphia, heal thyself. "I hope people will accept the verdict and move on without a lot of commentary and conversation and respect that these seven [jurors] did the very best they could do," W. Wilson Goode said within hours after the $1.5 million verdict against the city was announced. "My prayer is that this city will - on this issue - heal itself.
NEWS
July 19, 1992 | By Robert Zausner and Jodi Enda, INQUIRER CONVENTION BUREAU
Patrick O'Leary, a 40-year-old New Yorker wearing a black shirt and cowboy boots, sat across an aisle from Marlene Johnson, a grandmother from Alaska, who wore all white. They appeared to have nothing in common. Except Bill Clinton. And, for the first time in a long time, elation over the Democratic ticket. "To me, it's a lot more exciting than the last 12 years. It's a new outlook, new blood," said O'Leary. "That's exciting. " "In Perot's words, we've been revitalized.
NEWS
January 7, 1992 | By Vanessa Williams, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was just another day at the office yesterday for Wilson Goode - in before 8 a.m., off to a public appearance, lunch at his desk, out way past 5 p.m. The location had changed, but the routine was the same. On the day when the city celebrated the inauguration of his successor as mayor, Edward G. Rendell, Goode worked his way through the transition from public to private life. Except for the two-hour inauguration ceremony at the Academy of Music, Goode spent the day ensconced in his new Center City high-rise office.
LIVING
November 4, 1993 | By Fen Montaigne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
W. Wilson Goode is stretched out on a massage table in a pair of maroon Jockey briefs, getting Rolfed. Sitting on a stool next to him is Robert Toporek, a Messianic masseur with a checkered past and a history of involvement in est, acupuncture, Gestalt Therapy, Silva Mind Control, Mastery of Empowerment and just about every other alternative, holistic or self-help movement that has hit America in the last quarter-century. Toporek, who has the pitchman's gift of gab, is kneading the smooth, light- brown skin of Philadelphia's former mayor and talking nonstop about his vision of the future.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 11, 2014
ISSUE | FERGUSON, MO. Call for backup Since when is the absolute guarantee of a conviction the basis for deciding whether to charge an individual with a crime ("Close read shows the Ferguson grand jury got it right," Dec. 7)? That would seem to be Currents columnist Michael Smerconish's conclusion in defending the prosecutor's decision not to bring charges against Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of Michael Brown, but it skirts the very issue Smerconish portends to address.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
NOBODY PICKED on Wilson Goode when he was a kid when his big brother was around. James Goode, three years older than the future Philadelphia mayor, didn't shy away from a fight, especially when it came to protecting his younger brother. "I was not a fighter," Wilson Goode said. "He took care of me. " James Henry Goode Sr., who grew up with Wilson, three other brothers and two sisters picking cotton and tobacco on a sharecropping farm in Seaboard, N.C., longtime operator of an auto-repair business in Southwest Philadelphia and a devoted supporter of his brother's political ambitions, died Sunday.
NEWS
January 21, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
MELVIN ELLIS was good at keeping secrets. A 35-year veteran of the Philadelphia Police Department, Melvin worked for many years as both a bodyguard and personal investigator for former Mayor W. Wilson Goode. What did he actually do for Goode? That was between him and the mayor. He didn't even tell his wife. He also worked with Sen. Edward Kennedy and Frank Sinatra. What did he do for them? He'd never tell. "That was why he was in such demand," said his wife, the former Suzanne Malseed.
SPORTS
November 30, 2012 | BY TED SILARY, Daily News Staff Writersilaryt@phillynews.com
LIKE MANY PEOPLE, Najee Goode likes to type his name into Google and see what pops up. He was doing exactly that in the fall of 2009 when, surprise, surprise, he discovered a guy named Najee Goode was a promising football player at West Virginia University. "That was pretty exciting. A guy with my name who was good in football," this Najee (pronounced nah-GEE) said. That Najee, a rookie, is now a backup linebacker with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. "Oh, yeah. I'm a big fan," this Goode said.
SPORTS
November 30, 2012 | BY TED SILARY, Daily News Staff Writer silaryt@phillynews.com
LIKE MANY PEOPLE, Najee Goode likes to type his name into Google and see what pops up. He was doing exactly that in the fall of 2009 when, surprise, surprise, he discovered a guy named Najee Goode was a promising football player at West Virginia University. "That was pretty exciting. A guy with my name who was good in football," said this Najee (pronounced nah-GEE). That Najee, a rookie, is now a backup linebacker with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. "Oh, yeah. I'm a big fan," this Goode said.
NEWS
January 19, 2011
'Day of Service' misses King's point I have watched with dismay as the so-called Martin Luther King Day of Service has grown more popular each year ("More than 75,000 help put King's legacy into action," Tuesday). I believe that Dr. King would not have participated in one of these days of service. Dr. King was not a servant. He was a rebel. He fought and struggled for justice and equality. While I do believe that volunteer service is laudable, I don't believe we are honoring him by doing it on his holiday.
NEWS
January 17, 2011 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
W. Wilson Goode is on the pulpit of Zion Baptist Church at Broad and Venango, fidgeting with his BlackBerry. It is a familiar place for Goode, filled with sympathetic and longtime allies, a place where his famously stiff delivery can give way to an only slightly awkward Baptist preacher's brimstone. A place where, at 72, he can flap his arms and do a little hop and wipe sweat from his brow and tell stories of how a woman with a spoon in the dirt ended up building an entire church.
NEWS
August 18, 2010
IN J. MATTHEW Wolfe's Aug. 16 op-ed ( "Brownouts: Unsafe & Unsound" ), he states his opinion on several local laws that he believes are unnecessary, including "a law that requires any company seeking to do business with the city pay all of its employees, even those not involved in city work, 150 percent of the higher of the state or federal minimum wage," and that "all of these laws apply nowhere else in Pennsylvania. " First, the local living wage and benefits laws that I sponsored require that certain city contractors pay at least 150 percent of the federal minimum wage with comparable basic health benefits for full-time employees.
NEWS
August 12, 2010
CHARLES W. Bowser, who died yesterday at 79, tried twice to become the city's first black mayor. As an independent in 1975, Bowser came in second to Democrat Frank Rizzo but ahead of Republican Tom Foglietta. In '79, he came within 37,000 votes of winning the Democratic primary against eventual mayor Bill Green. But while his own candidacies were unsuccessful, Bowser blazed a trail for African-American leaders in this city. His advice, support and political savvy were critical to the election of the man who did reach that milestone in 1983, W. Wilson Goode.
NEWS
May 13, 2010 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When he left office in 1992, W. Wilson Goode Sr. set about putting what he called his "real feelings" about the MOVE tragedy into writing. "Sadly I realized that the police had killed two birds with one stone - MOVE and me," Goode wrote in his autobiography, In Goode Faith. But today, at 71, with two more decades of perspective, a doctorate from a Baptist seminary, and a distinguished gray goatee, the city's first black mayor says he has moved on from such a harsh assessment of the significance of May 13, 1985.
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