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ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
FOLLOWING the lead of fellow film legend Werner Herzog, director Wim Wenders uses 3-D cameras to explore the artistic impulse in the documentary "Pina. " Herzog used 3-D to mull primitive art in "Cave of Forgotten Dreams"; in the Oscar-nominated "Pina," Wenders considers the career and work of avant-garde German choreographer Pina Bausch. Wenders' idea is to allow Bausch's work to speak for itself - he uses 3-D cameras to capture some of her dance pieces, augmented by commentary from members of her troupe, who explain Bausch's gifts as an artist and as a motivator.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1997 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Violence is so pervasive in our movies that a film that discusses its impact instead of simply exploiting it is a welcome and all too rare event. Wim Wenders, the German master whose films include the great Paris, Texas, might seem an ideal choice to cast an objective eye on violence in American culture. His views in The End of Violence yield a provocative work that is at its best in considering those who reap immense profits by purveying images of violence in various media. The movie has its faults - most notably in bending its plot and the behavior of its characters to support an appeal for radical changes in attitude - but it is a better and more deserving piece than its release history suggested.
NEWS
February 4, 1994 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Faraway, So Close" gave me a splitting Euro-headache. The movie, by German directing legend Wim Wenders, is a sequel to his imaginative, winsome "Wings of Desire," and maybe that's the problem. The second time around, Wenders' ideas just don't seem so imaginative. The retread atmosphere tends to draw attention to the film's shortcomings, which can be summarized as the tendency to confound the viewer with windy dialogue, a specialty of European cinema. "They say that time is money," says one character.
NEWS
February 7, 1992 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Until the End of the World" comes dangerously close to an accurate description of its own duration on screen. It's a failed but brave attempt to mix a road picture with fancy science fiction. The movie fails because it has too many ideas, rather than too few. At the better part of three hours, it wears out its welcome. For an hour or so, "Until the End of the World" is a light-hearted traveling adventure, as a free-spirited woman (Solveig Dommartin) attempts to follow a mysterious man (William Hurt)
NEWS
June 3, 1992 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The first time Wim Wenders put on a jacket by Yohji Yamamoto, a trendy Japanese designer whose clothes are marked by a dark, monastic simplicity, the feeling was profound: "The jacket reminded me of my childhood and my father," Wenders says, recalling the unwavering rightness of the fabric and cut. Notebook on Cities and Clothes, the German filmmaker's ruminative 1989 documentary on Yamamoto - which makes its area debut tonight at the Temple...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2011 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
GETTING the hardware and software synchronized for a high-tech product introduction isn't always easy. In the case of 3D TV, the complaint "there's nothing to watch" may have held some weight. But this holiday season, there are wonders galore to explore on 3D Blu-ray video discs. And some pay TV customers can have it really good if they've invested in a 3D-ready television and increasingly comfortable companion glasses. Major figures like Martin Scorsese ("Hugo"), Wim Wenders ("Pina")
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1992 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In the restless films of Wim Wenders, characters are at home only when on the road. All the better to juxtapose rugged mugs, such as those of Harry Dean Stanton in Paris, Texas, and Bruno Ganz in Wings of Desire, with lyrical landscapes. Wenders sees the picturesque everywhere, in a diesel-shrouded U.S. Interstate and also in chrome-plated gargoyles hovering over Berlin. Among Wenders vagabonds, who typically salt their wander with lust, none travels more miles than Claire Tourneur (Solveig Dommartin)
NEWS
February 5, 2012 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
Wim Wenders was two weeks away from the start date for his new film when his star - Philippina "Pina" Bausch , the German choreographer - died. She had cancer, and had been diagnosed only five days earlier. "We had been talking about making this together for almost 20 years," says Wenders, who had finally figured out how to go about doing his documentary - in 3-D - when Bausch died. "We were so happy that after 20 years of stalling, Pina and I were finally now on. " And then came the news of her death.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1992 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"For me, the whole idea of the future was just a way to take a few liberties with the present," says Wim Wenders, whose Until the End of the World portrays a 1999 in which videophones, micro-computers and hand-held tracking machines can keep tabs on people anywhere on Earth. "It was a way to address our hopes and fears and wishes. . . . It's really about us, today. " Literally an all-over-the-map road movie, Until the End of the World stars William Hurt and Solveig Dommartin as a couple in pursuit of love and each other, racing from one country to the next until they land in the Australian outback - where Max Von Sydow and Jeanne Moreau are engaged in high-tech experiments with dreams and HDTV.
NEWS
May 11, 1989 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
The 42d Cannes Film Festival opens tonight with the foreign debut of New York Stories, the Manhattan triptych by director superstars Woody Allen, Francis Coppola and Martin Scorsese. Maverick American filmmakers will also be enjoying considerable exposure here, where for the next 12 days features by Paul Bartel, Kathryn Bigelow, Jim Jarmusch, Spike Lee and Wayne Wang will be given their world premieres. In all, 22 movies from 11 nations - principally the United States, France and Italy - will compete for the Golden Palm, the festival's highest accolade.
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NEWS
February 5, 2012 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
Wim Wenders was two weeks away from the start date for his new film when his star - Philippina "Pina" Bausch , the German choreographer - died. She had cancer, and had been diagnosed only five days earlier. "We had been talking about making this together for almost 20 years," says Wenders, who had finally figured out how to go about doing his documentary - in 3-D - when Bausch died. "We were so happy that after 20 years of stalling, Pina and I were finally now on. " And then came the news of her death.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
FOLLOWING the lead of fellow film legend Werner Herzog, director Wim Wenders uses 3-D cameras to explore the artistic impulse in the documentary "Pina. " Herzog used 3-D to mull primitive art in "Cave of Forgotten Dreams"; in the Oscar-nominated "Pina," Wenders considers the career and work of avant-garde German choreographer Pina Bausch. Wenders' idea is to allow Bausch's work to speak for itself - he uses 3-D cameras to capture some of her dance pieces, augmented by commentary from members of her troupe, who explain Bausch's gifts as an artist and as a motivator.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2011 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
GETTING the hardware and software synchronized for a high-tech product introduction isn't always easy. In the case of 3D TV, the complaint "there's nothing to watch" may have held some weight. But this holiday season, there are wonders galore to explore on 3D Blu-ray video discs. And some pay TV customers can have it really good if they've invested in a 3D-ready television and increasingly comfortable companion glasses. Major figures like Martin Scorsese ("Hugo"), Wim Wenders ("Pina")
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2003 | By Nathaniel Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
On 1997's Buena Vista Social Club, Ibrahim Ferrer's powerful, fluid tenor was one voice among many in the musical panorama that Ry Cooder, in almost documentary fashion, had reanimated for posterity. But in 1998, Wim Wenders' actual documentary granted Ferrer individuality and star power. Ferrer's garrulous good nature, man-about-town charm, and unpretentious lust for life - not to mention his habit of doling out liquor to his favorite saints - made him the most vivid and personable of the Buena Vista bunch.
NEWS
June 18, 1999 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Music has always played a major role in the haunting, dreamstate films of Wim Wenders, harking back to his directorial debut in 1970 with "Summer in the City," dedicated to the Kinks. "Rock and roll, to quote Lou Reed, has saved my life," allowed the 53-year-old German-born director with a laugh, in a recent conversation sparked by his small yet charming new musical documentary, "Buena Vista Social Club," opening today. "All my movies have been influenced by the music I've used in them - 'Lisbon Story' by the Portuguese group Madredeus, 'Paris, Texas,' and 'The End of Violence' by the scoring of Ry Cooder.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1997 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Violence is so pervasive in our movies that a film that discusses its impact instead of simply exploiting it is a welcome and all too rare event. Wim Wenders, the German master whose films include the great Paris, Texas, might seem an ideal choice to cast an objective eye on violence in American culture. His views in The End of Violence yield a provocative work that is at its best in considering those who reap immense profits by purveying images of violence in various media. The movie has its faults - most notably in bending its plot and the behavior of its characters to support an appeal for radical changes in attitude - but it is a better and more deserving piece than its release history suggested.
NEWS
February 4, 1994 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Faraway, So Close" gave me a splitting Euro-headache. The movie, by German directing legend Wim Wenders, is a sequel to his imaginative, winsome "Wings of Desire," and maybe that's the problem. The second time around, Wenders' ideas just don't seem so imaginative. The retread atmosphere tends to draw attention to the film's shortcomings, which can be summarized as the tendency to confound the viewer with windy dialogue, a specialty of European cinema. "They say that time is money," says one character.
NEWS
June 3, 1992 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The first time Wim Wenders put on a jacket by Yohji Yamamoto, a trendy Japanese designer whose clothes are marked by a dark, monastic simplicity, the feeling was profound: "The jacket reminded me of my childhood and my father," Wenders says, recalling the unwavering rightness of the fabric and cut. Notebook on Cities and Clothes, the German filmmaker's ruminative 1989 documentary on Yamamoto - which makes its area debut tonight at the Temple...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1992 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"For me, the whole idea of the future was just a way to take a few liberties with the present," says Wim Wenders, whose Until the End of the World portrays a 1999 in which videophones, micro-computers and hand-held tracking machines can keep tabs on people anywhere on Earth. "It was a way to address our hopes and fears and wishes. . . . It's really about us, today. " Literally an all-over-the-map road movie, Until the End of the World stars William Hurt and Solveig Dommartin as a couple in pursuit of love and each other, racing from one country to the next until they land in the Australian outback - where Max Von Sydow and Jeanne Moreau are engaged in high-tech experiments with dreams and HDTV.
NEWS
February 7, 1992 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Until the End of the World" comes dangerously close to an accurate description of its own duration on screen. It's a failed but brave attempt to mix a road picture with fancy science fiction. The movie fails because it has too many ideas, rather than too few. At the better part of three hours, it wears out its welcome. For an hour or so, "Until the End of the World" is a light-hearted traveling adventure, as a free-spirited woman (Solveig Dommartin) attempts to follow a mysterious man (William Hurt)
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