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Wind Chill

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NEWS
January 5, 1999 | ERIC MENCHER / Inquirer Staff Photographer
A homeless man, who declined to be identified, moved his belongings to a spot on 23d Street, just north of Market, yesterday. The city issued a "code blue" Thursday for the duration of the cold snap. When the wind chill falls below 10 degrees, extra teams are sent out to coax homeless people into shelters.
NEWS
December 15, 1989 | By Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
There's not going to be anything sweet about this weekend. In fact, it going to be downwhite bitter. Kicking it off this afternoon is still another snowstorm, followed by "bitter cold" whipped up by a wind chill of below zero. Accu Weather's Chuck Jones said the snow starting this afternoon will continue until the wee hours of tomorrow morning. By then there should be 2 to 4 inches on the ground in the city and immediate suburbs. In a switch from the usual pattern, there will "probably" be less ("an inch or two")
NEWS
January 15, 2000 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Nicole Weisensee contributed to this report
Winter breathed its worst frigid air of the young year yesterday and blasted Philadelphia, killing two homeless men. And despite a weekend respite, temperatures are expected to drop again by Monday, and the freeze could last from six to 10 days, said Accu-Weather forecaster Brett Anderson. "This is January the way it's supposed to be," Anderson said. "It's been above normal for most of the winter. We've had it easy. " But with frigid temperatures comes death. The first to die was Yancie Atkins, 69, who was found lying on the sidewalk at 9th near Poplar streets at 6:41 a.m. yesterday.
NEWS
December 29, 2004
Cold snap ON A RECENT Monday morning: "It's 10 degrees outside. " "You mean wind chill. " "No. The wind chill is 11 below. The temperature is 10 degrees. " Just then KYW radio said it again, so there was no dispute. It's 10 degrees outside. The cold brought with it a certain calmness. There was still the mall and traffic - but the cold of Monday gave such a clear view of the warmth on Saturday. There was still street crime and international war, but when I stepped outside and felt that it was actually 10 degrees, it gave me an extra reason to find warmth in the world.
NEWS
March 6, 1989 | By Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
Here we go again. Only this time it appears to be on the level. There's a snowstorm - accompanied by a wind chill of zero tonight - blowing in from eastern Tennessee that has Philadelphia written all over it. And by tomorrow, there's an outside chance that meteorologists could be writing "I told you so" in a foot of snow. Half that much or less, however, is more realistic. Sure, you say. What about a week ago when the city was supposed to be blanketed? All we got were flurries.
NEWS
February 20, 1993 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
President Clinton couldn't have picked a more appropriate spot for his morning jog yesterday - CHILL-icothe, indeed. The President, in town for a Q&A with taxpayers about his economic plan, logged three miles at a local park, undaunted by toe-numbing cold. "Yeah, it's 3 degrees," Clinton shrugged when shivering reporters exclaimed about the temperature, which felt like 6 below with the wind chill. "Which I suppose means I don't have enough sense to be President," he quipped later at the session with townspeople.
NEWS
December 21, 1993
Yesterday was supposed to be the busiest mail day of the year. That's what the Postal Service was predicting last week, given the track record of Christmases past. It's the day, typically, when folks face the music, as it were, and dump off the last of those rubber-banded stacks of cards and boxes lovingly stuffed with goodies for grown children who can't make it home for the holidays. To give you an idea of just how overwhelming the crunch is, the Postal Service delivers about 80 million pieces on a normal day. Around this time of year, the haul can soar up around the 300 million mark.
NEWS
February 16, 1987 | By GLORIA CAMPISI and FRANK LENNY, Daily News Staff Writers (The Associated Press contributed to this report.)
It was indeed colder than an Arctic igloo overnight. But it didn't break a record. The low of nine degrees at Philadelphia International Airport, which hung on for the three hours between 4 a.m. and 7 a.m., was still warmer than the record two above zero set in 1888. The uniformly single-digit readings throughout the area forced scores of homeless people off the streets. The National Weather Service reported lows of seven degrees in Willow Grove, Harrisburg and Bader Field in Atlantic City, four in Allentown and, coldest in the country, 30 below in Watertown, N.Y. Shelters and police stations took in the homeless yesterday, when temperatures ranged between 9 and 21 degrees and winds averaged 15 mph, at times reducing the wind chill factor to minus 28 degrees.
NEWS
January 6, 1988 | By Mark Wagenveld, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
City workers dispatched emergency fuel and tried to coax the homeless off the streets last night as bitterly cold weather settled in for what looked like a lengthy stay. The National Weather Service predicted near-record lows overnight and said it would remain cold - though sunny - today with a high of 15 to 20, followed by a second night of near-zero cold. Winds out of the west at 10 to 20 m.p.h. will cause a wind chill of 20 below zero, and the weather service advised anyone going outdoors to dress warmly.
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SPORTS
February 25, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
EVEN IN THE most stressful form of golf, Matt Kuchar and his easy smile made the Match Play Championship in Marana, Ariz., look like a weekend game with his buddies. It was fun when he built a 4-up lead at the turn. And when Hunter Mahan threw his best golf at him during a wild back nine Sunday at Dove Mountain, Kuchar never looked rattled, never felt as if the match belonged to anyone but him, and never lost the lead. Kuchar kept momentum on his side with four birdies on the back nine, the last conceded on the 17th hole for a 2-and-1 victory.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sam did not die Wednesday night. Despite the cold and the untold ounces of Hurricane Malt Liquor he drank; despite shivering uncontrollably in his bed of ragged blankets beneath I-95 in South Philadelphia - Sam survived. That's because a team from Project H.O.M.E. and the city's Department of Behavioral Health cajoled and begged the homeless 52-year-old native of Ho Chi Minh City to let them take him to the emergency room at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in the midst of a code-blue alert under a frigid moon.
SPORTS
January 24, 2013 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
MILWAUKEE - Halfway numbers: As Monday marked the halfway point of the season, let's take a look at some of the numbers the Sixers accumulated during their first 41 games. * The Sixers were 15-0 when leading at the end of the first quarter this season. They were 2-24 when tied or trailing going into the fourth quarter. Both wins came against the Toronto Raptors. * The team was 9-3 when scoring 100 or more points and 3-17 when scoring below 90. * The Sixers had made 18 more shots than their opponents, but were outscored by 170 points.
NEWS
January 24, 2013 | BY DERRICK MOORE, Daily News Staff Writer moored@phillynews.com, 215-854-5904
AS A SAX-PLAYING busker in Suburban Station ad-libbed his final bars, stores shuttered for the night Tuesday and two homeless-outreach workers scanned the underground concourse. The workers' goal: Get any people out on the streets - or those hiding out in Suburban Station to avoid the bone-chilling cold - into a shelter. The wind chill was projected to dip to a dangerous 5 degrees. "This is one of our busiest nights," said Stanley Crawley. "It's going to be Code Blue all week.
NEWS
March 27, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
The mercury dipped below 32 overnight, but the area may have been largely spared from a damaging deep freeze. The temperature bottomed out at 32 about 7 a.m. at Philadelphia International Airport; Trenton never got below 33; and even Lancaster and Reading never hit the 20s. Hourly readings showed only a single 28 or 29 in Wilmington, Millville and Pomona, outside Atlantic City, with only a couple of readings below 32. Cold did linger, though,...
SPORTS
June 19, 2009 | By Joe Juliano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With a gusty wind pushing the rain sideways at times and a chill in the air, one could have sworn alien forces had picked up the U.S. Open overnight and transported it to the Scottish coast. But this was still Bethpage Black and this was yesterday's first round of the 109th national championship, or at least 3 1/4 hours of it, anyway, because of heavy rain that overwhelmed an already saturated course and forced suspension for the day. Play was initially called at 10:15 a.m. after puddles formed on the greens faster than the squeegees could clear them off. The U.S. Golf Association hoped for a window of clearing that would have gotten players back on the course in mid-afternoon but surrendered to the elements at 1:55 p.m. after more than an inch of rain had fallen.
NEWS
January 21, 2009 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Barack Hussein Obama took the oath of office yesterday as the 44th president of the United States, calling in a sober inaugural address for a "new era of responsibility" and shared sacrifice to lead the nation back to peace and prosperity. "Our time of standing pat, of protecting narrow interests and putting off unpleasant decisions - that time has surely passed," Obama declared. "Starting today, we must pick ourselves up, dust ourselves off, and begin again the work of remaking America.
SPORTS
January 9, 2009 | By LES BOWEN, bowenl@phillynews.com
It was really, really cold last week in Minnesota, the wind chill at minus-16 just before the Eagles and Vikings kicked off Sunday afternoon. Since the game was played inside the Metrodome, though, that circumstance was just a footnote, instead of the trigger to some sort of historic struggle against the elements, like the 1967 "Ice Bowl" between the Cowboys and Packers. This week, when the Eagles visit the Giants in a divisional round playoff game, nobody on the field is going to be wondering what the weather outside Giants Stadium is like.
NEWS
October 28, 2008 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After 28 years in the wilderness, Phillies fans are used to frustration. But this latest blow asked an awful lot. For six innings, victory seemed at hand, and the city was gearing up for a long night of revelry. But cold wind and steady rain crashed the party. When the game was officially suspended at 11:10 p.m., a collective groan emanated from inside Citizens Bank Park and echoed throughout the region. Redemption remains at least a day away. "We're cursed," said Steve Levay of Furlong, Bucks County, who found himself huddling among the shivering masses in the ballpark corridors as the suspension was announced.
NEWS
February 6, 2007 | Daily News wire services
Bone-chilling cold blamed for four deaths across the U.S. CLEVELAND - A bone-chilling arctic cold wave with temperatures as low as 42 below zero shut down schools for thousands of youngsters yesterday, sent homeless people into shelters and put car batteries on the disabled list from the northern Plains across the Great Lakes. At least four deaths were linked to the cold weather. "Anybody in their right mind wouldn't want to be out in weather like this," Lawrence Wiley, 57, said at Cincinnati's crowded Drop Inn Center homeless shelter, where he has been living.
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