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NEWS
January 16, 2013
Gamesa Technology Corp. Inc., of Trevose, has secured a 10-year contract to provide operation and maintenance for the 264-megawatt NedPower Mount Storm wind-power project in West Virginia. The agreement is a renewal of a five-year contract that ends in June. Under the full-service contract, Gamesa will maintain the 132 Gamesa turbines in Grant County, W.Va., one of the largest wind farms in the eastern United States. NedPower is owned by Dominion Resources Inc. and Shell WindEnergy Inc. Gamesa did not disclose terms of the contract, which involves the employment of about six people.
NEWS
March 5, 2008 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
An established utility, a wind-farm developer, and a consortium of commercial fishermen each have proposed building giant turbine-driven power plants off the Jersey Shore, hoping to demonstrate the viability of the ocean breeze as a clean source of electricity. The three proposals vary widely - locations, for example, are between three and 16 miles off Atlantic or Cape May County - and timelines are iffy. Theoretically, however, within five years 100 spinning turbines could be generating 350 megawatts, enough to power 125,000 homes.
NEWS
October 27, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
HOUSTON - BP Wind Energy has reached a $750 million deal with General Electric Co. to supply and maintain 350 turbines for wind farms in Pennsylvania and Kansas. The agreement was announced Thursday. Houston-based BP Wind Energy says GE has agreed to deliver 88 turbines to the Mehoopany Wind Farm, located 20 miles northwest of Scranton, Pa. The 262 other turbines are meant for BP's Flat Ridge 2 Wind Farm, about 60 miles southwest of Wichita, Kan. BP says both projects are expected to be generating power by late 2012, with a combined capability of 560 megawatts.
NEWS
January 16, 2013
Atlantic Wind Connection announced Tuesday that it has selected New Jersey for the first phase for its transmission project that envisions connecting giant offshore wind farms to the power grid. The Princeton consortium's plans call for converting power generated by wind turbines to high-voltage direct-current electricity that would be transmitted to the mainland by undersea cables. The power would be converted on offshore platforms about 260 feet long, 165 feet wide and 11 stories above the water, according to its application filed with the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management.
NEWS
May 7, 2011
Fishermen's Energy of New Jersey, a company that wants to build wind farms off the coast, has received final state approval for a demonstration project of six turbines in state waters. Company spokeswoman Rhonda Jackson said one more hurdle remains - Army Corps of Engineers permission, which she anticipates could come next week. The latest permit gives the company the go-ahead to dig under the beach and Boardwalk in Atlantic City to lay electric transmission cables. The company also has finished the required year of avian and marine mammal monitoring.
NEWS
March 5, 2008 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An established utility, a wind-farm developer, and a consortium of commercial fishermen each have proposed building giant turbine-driven power plants off the Jersey Shore, hoping to demonstrate the viability of the ocean breeze as a clean source of electricity. The three proposals vary widely - locations, for example, are between three and 16 miles off Atlantic or Cape May County - and timelines are iffy. Theoretically, however, within five years 100 spinning turbines could be generating 350 megawatts, enough to power 125,000 homes.
NEWS
February 26, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
How many tourists would travel to Atlantic City to view the nation's first offshore wind farm? Fishermen's Energy, which has proposed building five giant turbines about 2.8 miles off the resort city's beaches, estimates 4.5 million people a year would visit the site, according to a consultant's report that recommends the state should turn down the project because it is too costly. Fishermen's Atlantic City Windfarm anticipates more visitors each year than the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y., the Washington Monument, or the Museum of Modern Art in New York, according to a derisive analysis by Acadian Consulting Group that was commissioned by the New Jersey Division of Rate Counsel, the state's ratepayer advocate.
NEWS
August 11, 2003
A consistent breeze blows through Web sites and letters-to-the-editor around the country: "Right idea; wrong place. " These "not in my back yard" campaigns oppose proposed "wind farms" that generate electricity an old-fashioned way - from nature. Just as windmills were used for centuries to pump water and grind grain, today they can generate electricity to light homes, run appliances, and charge cell phones. Best of all, wind electricity is inexhaustible and nonpolluting. In theory, wind energy has a high approval rating.
NEWS
April 14, 2005 | By Michael Dolan
Driving through Somerset County in Western Pennsylvania, my eyes are drawn to the giant turbines ahead, which loom over the horizon like apocalyptic watchtowers. To some, they are scars upon the landscape. To others, they are deadly blades taking down hawks and migratory birds alike. To me, they are the winds of hope. Specifically, the wind farms of hope. Thanks to Peco Wind, launched in May 2004, and wind farms throughout Pennsylvania, Peco customers have the option, and I daresay the obligation, to support green energy.
NEWS
October 13, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Investors on Tuesday proposed to build an underwater electricity superhighway that would carry wind power generated off the Mid-Atlantic Coast to land. The $5 billion transmission line, announced by backers including Google, would run about 15 to 20 miles offshore. It would act like a spine, linking the offshore projects to land at four locations - North Jersey, South Jersey near Atlantic City, the coast of Delaware and the coast of Virginia south of Norfolk. "This is a huge, bold project," said Robert Mitchell, CEO of Trans-Elect, an independent transmission company operating nationwide, which is leading the project.
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NEWS
September 8, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
ISSUE | WIND POWER Birds, bats victimized Wind farms have one big drawback ("Hot air isn't wind power," Aug. 30). Even the relatively small number of wind turbines in this country slaughter an estimated 140,000 to 328,000 eagles, hawks, falcons, vultures, California condors, and other endangered and protected flying creatures in North America each year. While possession of an eagle feather can result in a stiff fine, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service allows repeated "takings" (killings)
NEWS
August 31, 2016
Back when he was working full-time in New Jersey, instead of trekking campaign trails for himself or an old chum, Gov. Christie signed a bill laying the foundation for his state to lead the nation in helping the fledgling wind energy industry expand to the sea. Funny how that changed once Christie began his run for president. Other than blowing his own hot air, he lost interest in wind power. Under Christie's direction, the state Board of Public Utilities created bureaucratic delays to impede the progress of an industry that had already received federal funding to locate turbines three miles off the Atlantic City coast.
NEWS
May 9, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proposal to build an offshore wind farm about three miles east of Atlantic City could be back in the race to become the nation's first. On Wednesday, the U.S. Department of Energy announced that the New Jersey project would receive up to $47 million in funding over the next four years - a quarter of the $188 million plan. Financial feasibility had been the main issue when, in March, the state Board of Public Utilities rejected the plan. Fishermen's Energy asked for a reconsideration, which was rejected in late April.
NEWS
March 21, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey's energy regulation agency on Wednesday rejected the funding mechanism for a $188 million offshore wind farm, essentially blocking a proposal that supporters said could have made the state a leader in offshore wind. At a meeting Wednesday in Trenton, the four commissioners of the state Board of Public Utilities voted unanimously, in support of board staff's recommendation, to reject the proposal. The funding was the final necessary piece of the proposed Atlantic City Offshore Windfarm project, developer Fishermen's Energy said.
NEWS
October 2, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Sierra Club launched an ad campaign Monday aimed at pressuring Gov. Christie into making building offshore wind farms a priority. The ad blitz - including messages on billboards on major highways and in some of the state's largest newspapers - came as a new poll showed broad support among New Jerseyans for public investment in renewable energy sources, including offshore wind farms. "I join the majority of New Jerseyans calling on Gov. Christie to make our state a leader in clean, renewable offshore wind power," Michael Brune, executive director of the Sierra Club, said in a statement Monday.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gamesa Technology Corp., the Spanish wind-turbine maker with U.S. headquarters in Trevose, said it has sold 10 of its new high-capacity turbines to its first U.S. customer, the Big Turtle Wind Farm near Harbor Beach, Mich. Gamesa said the G114-2.0 megawatt wind turbines, which have a rotor diameter of 114 meters or 374 feet, are designed to significantly increase energy output from low- and medium-wind sites. The new turbine has a 38 percent larger swept area than Gamesa's 97-meter turbine.
NEWS
April 15, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NORTH EAST, Pa. - Some northwestern Pennsylvania residents want limits placed on the size of wind turbines that can be built in their area and a ban on commercial windmills within a mile of any neighborhood. Neighbors For A Responsible North East also wants a requirement that developers set aside money to cover any depreciation in private property after a wind farm is built and the cost to remove nonfunctional turbines, the Erie Times-News said. One of the organizers, Paul Crowe, said members are trying to spread the word about plans to build a commercial wind farm in North East Township before any ordinances are considered.
NEWS
February 26, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
How many tourists would travel to Atlantic City to view the nation's first offshore wind farm? Fishermen's Energy, which has proposed building five giant turbines about 2.8 miles off the resort city's beaches, estimates 4.5 million people a year would visit the site, according to a consultant's report that recommends the state should turn down the project because it is too costly. Fishermen's Atlantic City Windfarm anticipates more visitors each year than the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y., the Washington Monument, or the Museum of Modern Art in New York, according to a derisive analysis by Acadian Consulting Group that was commissioned by the New Jersey Division of Rate Counsel, the state's ratepayer advocate.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Offshore wind power has gotten off to a slow start in New Jersey, but that has not stopped the developers of an ambitious plan to transmit the electricity generated by giant turbines from moving forward with their multi-billion dollar project. The developers of the Atlantic Wind Connection, which envisions building a seabed transmission backbone linking offshore power generators to onshore customers, are rallying political support for the project, casting it as a cost-effective solution that will make New Jersey the center of the nation's offshore power industry.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2013
In the Region   Plan for giant wind farms off N.J.   Atlantic Wind Connection announced Tuesday that it selected New Jersey for the first phase for its transmission project that envisions connecting giant offshore wind farms to the power grid. The Princeton consortium's plans call for converting power generated by wind turbines to high-voltage direct-current electricity that would be transmitted to the mainland by undersea cables. The power would be converted on offshore platforms about 260 feet long, 165 feet wide and 11 stories above the water, according to its application filed with the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management . The NJ Energy Link would connect offshore power to users in northern, central and southern New Jersey.
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