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BUSINESS
May 3, 2006 | By Jeff Gelles INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With soaring fuel prices making wind energy seem economical as well as green, a local wind-power company agreed yesterday to be bought for $30 million by Iberdrola, a big Spanish rival. Community Energy Inc., of Wayne, said it was selling out because wind's sudden emergence as a competitive alternative has made it difficult for a small company to obtain equipment increasingly in short supply. The privately held company, which had revenue last year of about $10 million, markets about 500 megawatts of wind power to 75,000 residences, businesses and institutions all across the country, said Brent Alderfer, its cofounder and president.
NEWS
January 4, 2013 | By T.W. Farnam, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The fiscal-cliff bill that prevented income taxes from rising for most Americans also renewed special tax breaks for a variety of industries, from Hollywood to wind power, in what has become a perennial ritual on Capitol Hill. The tax breaks, which the Senate included in the legislation that passed Congress late Tuesday, will end up costing about $100 billion over the next two years. Some of the largest include the research-and-development tax credit, which will cost $14 billion over the next decade, and another for overseas income through "active financing" at a cost of $11 billion to taxpayers over the next year.
NEWS
August 10, 1993 | By Jim Detjen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What's wrong with Mario Andretti's windmill? Atop a ridge behind Andretti's northern Pennsylvania home, the racing car legend has built a 120-foot-tall windmill. On a recent morning, its three blades spun briskly in the breeze. But Andretti, a man accustomed to high performance, was unhappy. He has invested close to $70,000 in the wind machine, and it generates only a fraction of the electricity he'd thought it would. "I'm disappointed," he says. "I'm trying to keep an open mind.
NEWS
March 24, 2011
Turkey Hill Dairy, the Lancaster County ice cream and ice tea maker, said today that it will receive 25 percent of its annual electricity needs from a new wind power turbine facility along the Susquehanna River. The Frey Farm project, consisting of two wind turbines, will produce enough power to produce six million gallons of ice cream and 15 million gallons of iced tea annually, the Conestoga-based company said. In February, the turbines' first full month of operation, they provided about 32 percent of the dairy's electricity.
NEWS
March 18, 2012
Gavin Shire is vice president of the American Bird Conservancy in Washington When the young boy in the Hans Christian Andersen fable cried out, "The emperor has no clothes!" the people of the kingdom realized that the ruse was over. They could no longer keep up the pretense that their leader's imaginary new suit was indeed splendid. Had one of the emperor's aides spoken out earlier, he could have been spared a great deal of embarrassment. A trick similar to the one played by the tailors in the Andersen tale is being perpetrated on us today by the wind industry.
NEWS
April 12, 2011 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Viridity Energy Inc., the Conshohocken energy management firm, is expanding its smart-grid technology to Thomas Jefferson University and its Center City hospital. Viridity announced Tuesday that it has signed a letter of intent with Thomas Jefferson to develop a one-megawatt battery system that will allow the institution to cut electrical costs by storing cheap power produced at night for use during the day. Thomas Jefferson will use the system to optimize power purchases for its 18 Center City buildings, which occupy 4.5 million square feet and consume up to 22 megawatts, said Ron Bowlan, Jefferson's chief facilities officer.
NEWS
October 13, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Investors on Tuesday proposed to build an underwater electricity superhighway that would carry wind power generated off the Mid-Atlantic Coast to land. The $5 billion transmission line, announced by backers including Google, would run about 15 to 20 miles offshore. It would act like a spine, linking the offshore projects to land at four locations - North Jersey, South Jersey near Atlantic City, the coast of Delaware and the coast of Virginia south of Norfolk. "This is a huge, bold project," said Robert Mitchell, CEO of Trans-Elect, an independent transmission company operating nationwide, which is leading the project.
NEWS
August 22, 2003 | By Walter Cronkite
The great blackout of 2003 has exposed, with too stark a drama, that the country faces not one but two power problems: One is the matter of electric power; the other is the matter of political power. It will be easier to deal with the former than the latter. Among the experts in the electric power world, there seems to be agreement that to assure an uninterrupted source of power, we need more power plants and more transmission lines. Among the experts in the political power world, there is no agreement at all on how to get there - and as they argue the possibilities, another blackout festers.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1998 | By Rich Heidorn Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rising out of the Mojave Desert, on brown mountains dotted with sagebrush and Joshua trees, they appear first as a flock of lost seagulls. On closer inspection, the wings are the arms of 80-foot soldiers doing calisthenics in unison. This is the otherworldly view that greets visitors to Tehachapi Pass, where nearly 5,000 of these three-armed soldiers borrow the wind rushing through the Sierra Nevadas from the San Joaquin Valley - and turn it into electricity. Tehachapi Pass is the site of the largest collection of wind turbines in the world.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A group of local hospitals has banded together in an unusual initiative to buy power generated by the wind in Schuylkill and Columbia Counties. The wind power will supply approximately a third of their electricity for 10 years, the hospitals said in a news release yesterday. The health institutions participating in the group purchase are Albert Einstein Healthcare Network, Thomas Jefferson University, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital Inc., Main Line Health System, Frankford Hospitals, and Magee Rehabilitation.
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NEWS
January 27, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Scientists who tested a floating windmill off the coast of Maine a year ago have gathered enough data to build a full-size model that can be moved to take advantage of high winds. The U.S. Department of Energy is using lasers attached to buoys to measure wind speeds at differing altitudes off the coast of Virginia Beach to learn how cost-effective it would be to harness the higher winds above sea level to power wind turbines. Meanwhile, construction of the nation's first offshore wind farm may begin this year off Rhode Island.
NEWS
May 7, 2014
War on words As a Rutgers undergraduate in 1965, I was personally outraged when history professor and avowed Marxist Eugene Genovese said, "I do not fear or regret the impending Viet Cong victory in Vietnam. I welcome it. " However, I was even more outraged when Wayne Dumont, the Republican candidate for governor, called for Genovese's ouster. His attempt to muzzle free speech mobilized opposition to Dumont at Rutgers and caused me to cast my first vote ever for Democrat Richard Hughes.
NEWS
April 23, 2014 | BY JOHN M. CRISP
HERE'S A LOCAL story with national implications: With an average wind speed of around 12 mph, the city where I live isn't the windiest place in the country. But on many days - especially during spring and the long, hot summer - a strong, steady flow off the Gulf of Mexico makes Corpus Christi, Texas, a dependable destination for windsurfers and sailors. The energy in wind is impressive. Thus, the last half-decade has seen significant development of wind farms in the area, including the 168-turbine Penascal complex, 40 miles south of the city, and 196 turbines at the Papalote Creek installation to the north, which produces enough energy to supply 114,000 homes.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
As business leaders and members of a congressional task force on climate change met in Washington on Thursday to discuss how they were adapting, the Ikea Group trumped them by announcing a new renewable-energy project, its biggest worldwide. Rob Olson, chief financial officer and acting president of Ikea's U.S. division, based in Conshohocken, said the company was investing in a wind farm in Hoopeston, Ill., south of Chicago. It is the company's first wind farm, to be completed in 2015.
NEWS
March 21, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey's energy regulation agency on Wednesday rejected the funding mechanism for a $188 million offshore wind farm, essentially blocking a proposal that supporters said could have made the state a leader in offshore wind. At a meeting Wednesday in Trenton, the four commissioners of the state Board of Public Utilities voted unanimously, in support of board staff's recommendation, to reject the proposal. The funding was the final necessary piece of the proposed Atlantic City Offshore Windfarm project, developer Fishermen's Energy said.
NEWS
October 2, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Sierra Club launched an ad campaign Monday aimed at pressuring Gov. Christie into making building offshore wind farms a priority. The ad blitz - including messages on billboards on major highways and in some of the state's largest newspapers - came as a new poll showed broad support among New Jerseyans for public investment in renewable energy sources, including offshore wind farms. "I join the majority of New Jerseyans calling on Gov. Christie to make our state a leader in clean, renewable offshore wind power," Michael Brune, executive director of the Sierra Club, said in a statement Monday.
NEWS
April 18, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania maintained its green-power superiority for the seventh straight year, finishing in first place once again in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's nationwide challenge of universities that buy renewable power. Penn purchased 200.2 million kilowatt hours of wind power last year, 30 percent more than the next closest challenger, the University of Oklahoma. EPA defines green power as electricity produced from solar, wind, geothermal, biogas, eligible biomass, and low-impact small hydroelectric sources.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2013
In the Region   Wharton dean to step down   Thomas S. Robertson will resign as dean of the Wharton School , the prestigious business school at the University of Pennsylvania , as of June 30, 2014. He made the announcement in a letter to the faculty in which he said he intended to return to the school's marketing department to teach and pursue research. Named dean in June 2007, Robertson succeeded Patrick Harker, who left to become president of the University of Delaware . During Robertson's tenure, the size of the faculty increased to 478, including 230 tenured and tenure-track professors, from 435. - Mike Armstrong   Penn keeps green-power title   The University of Pennsylvania maintained its green-power superiority for the seventh straight year, finishing in first place once again in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 's nationwide challenge of universities that buy renewable power.
NEWS
January 4, 2013 | By T.W. Farnam, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The fiscal-cliff bill that prevented income taxes from rising for most Americans also renewed special tax breaks for a variety of industries, from Hollywood to wind power, in what has become a perennial ritual on Capitol Hill. The tax breaks, which the Senate included in the legislation that passed Congress late Tuesday, will end up costing about $100 billion over the next two years. Some of the largest include the research-and-development tax credit, which will cost $14 billion over the next decade, and another for overseas income through "active financing" at a cost of $11 billion to taxpayers over the next year.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The extension of the federal wind-power tax credit as part of the fiscal cliff package was hailed as a victory Wednesday by renewable power advocates. But a Bucks County wind-turbine manufacturer, where much of the workforce was furloughed in September because of a slowdown in orders, is unlikely to ramp up production any time soon because of the last-minute congressional rescue of the tax credit. "I think it will take a little while for this to work its way to the manufacturing sector, but it will be a stimulus," said David J. Rosenberg, the vice president of marketing for Gamesa USA, the Spanish wind-turbine manufacturer with U.S. headquarters in Langhorne.
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