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NEWS
January 28, 2008
AS A ARMY Reserve vet for six years, I can understand the need for the United States to police the world. But to spend billions on the war in Iraq is a definite waste of dollars. Mideasterners have been killing each other for more than 10,000 years. If the money our government is spending could be given to every U.S. citizen, and it would equal more than $1,000 for all 325 million Americans! Lawrence S. La Mantia, Philadelphia
NEWS
September 9, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - A Goodwill worker who spotted a photograph of Confederate General Robert E. Lee has helped the charity make $23,000 in an online auction. The tintype photograph was in a bin, about to be shipped out, when a worker grabbed it and sent it to the charity's local online department. The item was then put up for auction, which closed Wednesday night. "It would have gone to our outlet store where everything is sold by the pound," Goodwill spokeswoman Suzanne Kay-Pittman said yesterday.
NEWS
March 7, 1991 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
The Ridley School District's decision to drop plans for an earned-income tax has suddenly left Eddystone Borough with a budget surplus of about $57,000. Borough officials said Tuesday there is no legal provision for refunding the money, so it will have to remain in the borough coffers until a new budget is prepared for 1992. The $57,000 represents a 15-mill increase in the tax rate this year to cover a revenue loss anticipated if the School District had enacted a 1 percent earned income tax for the 1991-92 school year.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Mari A. Schaefer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Delaware County animal shelter will get an unexpected windfall Thursday courtesy of the state Treasury. Francisvale Home for Smaller Animals on Upper Gulph Road in Radnor Township found out it is owed $35,000 in unclaimed stock. "It is a complete windfall, a glorious windfall," said Heather Hennessey, shelter manager, adding the money will be earmarked for the general fund. "We have a big gap in our day to day expenses. " The 103-year-old non-profit facility, which sits on 16 acres, is a no-kill shelter and home to about 35 dogs and 62 cats.
NEWS
August 24, 1991
Thousands of people who probably had never won anything big before were shocked to learn each had won a $17,000 minivan. They compared the left halves of a van pictured in their packages of Kraft Singles cheese to right halves that were in Sunday newspaper coupons, and . . . . they matched! It seemed too good to be true. It was. A printing error had created thousands of "winners. " Kraft voided the contest. The inevitable class action suit followed. It has just been tentatively settled.
NEWS
March 8, 1988 | By HOWARD SCHNEIDER, Daily News Staff Writer
In a strongly worded 12-page opinion that speaks of public deception and legislative "mischief," City Solicitor Seymour Kurland has ruled that the windfall pension benefits City Council members voted for themselves and other senior elected officials last year are illegal. "The record in the present case reveals that the public may well have been deceived" when City Council President Joseph E. Coleman contended that a pending pension bill contained no extra benefits for elected officials, Kurland wrote.
NEWS
October 13, 2012 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Delaware County animal shelter received an unexpected windfall Thursday, courtesy of the state Treasury. Francisvale Home for Smaller Animals on Upper Gulph Road in Radnor Township found out it is owed $35,000 in unclaimed stock. "It is a complete windfall, a glorious windfall," shelter manager Heather Hennessey said, adding that the money would be earmarked for the general fund. "We have a big gap in our day-to-day expenses. " It is not the only shelter that has money coming its way. About $100,000 of the $1.9 billion in the Treasury Department's Unclaimed Property Program belongs to 12 organizations statewide that deal with animals.
NEWS
October 13, 1989 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal audit official has charged that last-minute changes in a controversial health-care contract for 80,000 city residents could result in a $29.5 million windfall to the winning contractor. In a detailed 22-page report, the regional inspector general in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services concluded that the $136 million-a-year pact with Healthcare Management Alternatives (HMA) should not be approved by the federal government. Citing lack of documentation and use of improper procedures, the report found that state actions, "invite reasonable people to conclude that there was at least the appearance of favoritism.
NEWS
May 28, 2003 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Two large, unexpected pots of cash arrived in time to bail out the state's budget this fiscal year and next, the Assembly Budget Committee was told yesterday. However, the tone was one of caution rather than unbridled joy at coming upon more than $1 billion in unanticipated revenue. The windfalls - offsetting drops in other revenue - were tempered by uncertainty over whether the state will have to refund some of the money. One legislator equated the situation with a "house of cards.
NEWS
April 7, 2006 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Don't count on a tax-season windfall to rescue the state from steep tax increases, state financial experts warned an Assembly panel yesterday. The $1 billion in unanticipated income tax that the state collected last spring is unlikely to materialize again, Treasurer Brad Abelow told the Budget Committee. "We're going to have to make these cuts," he said. "I can't imagine there being a surprise of the magnitude that would change that picture. " Last month, Gov. Corzine recommended raising the state's sales tax from 6 percent to 7 percent and making deep cuts in higher-education and municipal funding to close a multibillion-dollar budget shortfall.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
THE JURY sure didn't see any blurred lines. In Los Angeles, Marvin Gaye 's children were awarded nearly $7.4 million yesterday after a decision that Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams copied their father's music to create "Blurred Lines," the biggest hit song of 2013. Gaye's daughter Nona Gaye wept as the verdict was being read and was hugged by her attorney, Richard Busch . "Right now, I feel free," Nona Gaye said after the verdict. "Free from . . . Pharrell Williams and Robin Thicke's chains and what they tried to keep on us and the lies that were told.
NEWS
October 11, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he became principal of Lingelbach School this year, Marc Gosselin was stunned to learn that the 374-student school's budget for supplies this year was a meager $160. "As a new principal, I couldn't even send a letter to parents introducing myself," he said, "because I couldn't buy stamps. " On Tuesday, Gosselin and other principals around the district learned that his school was in line for a cash infusion - and right away - as a result of the district's decision Monday to cancel the teachers union contract and require teachers to pay more toward their health insurance.
SPORTS
January 11, 2014 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
The rich got richer last week and the poor/middle-income people who buy the tickets sure would like to know what the rich plan to do with all that money. What's going to happen to the Phillies payroll now that they have won baseball's version of Powerball on Steroids, which also goes by the name mega-billion-dollar deal with local regional sports network ? The short-term and long-term answers appear to be nothing, and that's not entirely a bad thing. When Citizens Bank Park opened in 2004, the Phillies payroll jumped from 15th among baseball's 30 teams to fifth.
NEWS
October 13, 2012 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Delaware County animal shelter received an unexpected windfall Thursday, courtesy of the state Treasury. Francisvale Home for Smaller Animals on Upper Gulph Road in Radnor Township found out it is owed $35,000 in unclaimed stock. "It is a complete windfall, a glorious windfall," shelter manager Heather Hennessey said, adding that the money would be earmarked for the general fund. "We have a big gap in our day-to-day expenses. " It is not the only shelter that has money coming its way. About $100,000 of the $1.9 billion in the Treasury Department's Unclaimed Property Program belongs to 12 organizations statewide that deal with animals.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Mari A. Schaefer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Delaware County animal shelter will get an unexpected windfall Thursday courtesy of the state Treasury. Francisvale Home for Smaller Animals on Upper Gulph Road in Radnor Township found out it is owed $35,000 in unclaimed stock. "It is a complete windfall, a glorious windfall," said Heather Hennessey, shelter manager, adding the money will be earmarked for the general fund. "We have a big gap in our day to day expenses. " The 103-year-old non-profit facility, which sits on 16 acres, is a no-kill shelter and home to about 35 dogs and 62 cats.
NEWS
July 29, 2012 | By Bill Reed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph Bucci was like "a kid in a candy store," his lawyer says. One day, the Trevose, Bucks County, man had $35.46 in his bank account. The next day, he had nearly $70,000. Over the next month, Bucci, 22, spent all but $2,000 of the windfall, buying a used car, a computer, a camera, clothes, furniture, and a dog, lawyer Michael Parlow said Friday. "He spent a majority of the money helping family and friends," Parlow said. "He lent money to a lot of people. " Now it's time to repay the bank that made the bookkeeping mistake, and he's trying scrape up the money and stay out of jail.
NEWS
April 27, 2012 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer
WINNING $172.7 million in the Powerball lottery is hardly the last stop for 48 lucky SEPTA-workers-turned-instant-millionaires - but rather an unscheduled detour in the route of life. The Daily News spoke last night with Matthew Sweeney, author of 2009's The Lottery Wars: Long Odds, Fast Money, and the Battle Over an American Institution, to get a sense of what's waiting down the tracks. Q. So what's the first piece of advice you'd give the SEPTA lottery winners?
NEWS
March 16, 2012 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Burlington County Board of Freeholders has agreed to sell Buttonwood Hospital for $15 million to help taxpayers, but the county budget will get only a roughly $7 million bump after the facility's debt is paid off. The 100-year-old county institution is expected to be turned over by June to Ocean Healthcare, a Lakewood, N.J., nursing-home rehabilitation chain. But first the county will have to retire more than $8 million in improvement bonds, Ralph Shrom, a board spokesman, said Thursday.
NEWS
September 9, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - A Goodwill worker who spotted a photograph of Confederate General Robert E. Lee has helped the charity make $23,000 in an online auction. The tintype photograph was in a bin, about to be shipped out, when a worker grabbed it and sent it to the charity's local online department. The item was then put up for auction, which closed Wednesday night. "It would have gone to our outlet store where everything is sold by the pound," Goodwill spokeswoman Suzanne Kay-Pittman said yesterday.
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