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Window Treatments

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2016
Q: My husband and I are considering buying a house in a great location, but it seems very open to the street. The windows let in lots of light, except there is no privacy - anybody going by can see right in, especially the kitchen. And my husband and I love to cook together and sometimes we get "playful. " I'd hate to live with all the curtains closed. We want this house, but I love our "moments" together, and I don't want to lose them. - M&M 4ever! A: It's wonderful to find playful moments whenever you can, not just around your anniversary or Valentine's Day. Celebrating cooking and food together is very romantic, and I would also hate for you to lose that because you feel on display in a new house.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2015
Q: I am a new owner of a Queen Anne Victorian. Although the furniture is Victorian, I do not want to use Victorian window coverings because the house has its original wavy glass windows and newly restored window surrounds. The windows are double hung, and only the bottom half would need to be covered at night for privacy. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated. - L.B. A: This sounds like a fun project. And there is no reason you have to stay true to the heavy Victorian style for your window treatments.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2016 | By Jennifer Adams
Q: A while ago, I bought some beautiful linen-colored drapery panels for my apartment, but now they have some stains and are very dusty. When I was a kid, I remember my grandma having her fancy draperies sent out for cleaning. Is there an easier way I can do this myself? - M.P. A: You'd be amazed at how much dust collects on draperies (and your walls, too), even though they are vertical. Cleaning your drapes and all window treatments will help reduce allergens and odors in your home, as well as lengthen the life of the fabric.
LIVING
April 18, 1997 | By Denise Cowie, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Window treatments are a bit like hair styles. You see a picture in a magazine of a style that looks great, so you tear out the page and say, "I want that!" Wrong approach, says Pam Singer, manager of the Calico Corners home-decorating store in Strafford, Chester County. What looks wonderful in a glamorously styled magazine room may not be right for your home at all. "There are certain styles that are suited to an old stone house in Philadelphia," she says, "but a new house with large, overscale furniture and Palladian windows will suggest a different treatment.
LIVING
April 26, 1996 | By Jill P. Capuzzo, FOR THE INQUIRER
Virginia Miller leads a visitor through a maze of 100 windows, each one adorned with a different combination of diaphanous curtains, casually arranged top sashes, colorful tiebacks and wrought-iron rods. These are windows with no views, and no walls, for that matter. This is the window-coverings department of J.C. Penney at the King of Prussia Mall, where the knowledgeable, efficient Miller can outfit a total decorating novice with the latest look in window treatments guaranteed to turn a drab apartment into something worthy of Melrose Place.
NEWS
April 27, 1997 | By Nicole Pensiero, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Brian and Beth Dworkin decided to go into business for themselves nearly nine years ago, they had one clear idea of what they wanted their store to be. "We wanted to offer things that weren't available in every store in the mall," said Beth Dworkin. "It was our goal to be unique. " So the Dworkins shopped for an existing business to take over and settled on a home decorating store in Pitman. They changed the product mix of linens, window treatments and gifts to include items for babies and small children, and Distinctively Yours was born.
REAL_ESTATE
October 21, 2007 | By Al Heavens, Inquirer Columnist
When is landscape lighting not just about lighting? When it becomes an important ingredient of curb appeal, says a lighting company "outdoor living expert" who contacted me recently. This was just the latest snowball in the avalanche of story pitches I've been getting from manufacturers trying to offer their products as routes out of the real estate slowdown. So, please, disregard the market forces affecting residential real estate - tighter credit, too much inventory, overproduction of new homes, too many flippers invading and then fleeing, and the fact that most Americans seemed to think they were living in cash registers and now the till is practically empty and the bill is due. Go buy some lights.
LIVING
September 14, 2001 | By Diane Goldsmith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With fall in the air, you might be thinking about sprucing up the inside of your home. After all, you'll be spending more time there in the coming months and want the space to be inviting. But with the economy in a slump, many folks are reluctant - or unable - to spend much. Can a modest outlay - such as the $600 federal income-tax rebate many families have received - begin to make a difference? You bet it can. Even if you can't afford a major room refurbishing, you can still get mileage out of, say, adding a pair of stylish rattan armchairs and an end table, or introducing new colors and textures into a room with such things as an area rug, pillows, accessories and plants, not to mention affordable window treatments and lighting.
LIVING
June 14, 2002 | By Claire Whitcomb FOR THE INQUIRER
Philadelphia native Sheila Bridges believes that with a little planning, a few flea-market finds, and several gallons of carefully chosen paint, you can turn any house into a place of calm and comfort. And you can achieve that goal even if you don't think you have the money to decorate. Her new book, Furnishing Forward: A Practical Guide to Furnishing for a Lifetime (Bulfinch Press, $40), distills her considerable wisdom. Bridges' ideas are sought by celebrity clients who range from novelist Tom Clancy to hip-hop musician/producer Sean "P. Diddy" Combs.
NEWS
April 18, 2012
ROLFE NEILL WAS the first editor of the Daily News after the sale to Knight Newspapers Inc. more than 40 years ago. A master of promotion and branding, one of his first acts as editor was to demand that the building at Broad and Callowhill streets bear the name of both newspapers above the entrance. Until then, the Daily News was effectively a tenant in its own headquarters – in the Inquirer Building. And it was done. In fact, the message was so clear that the simple block letters of the Daily News logo were visually dominant over the fussy gothic script of the Inquirer's.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2016 | By Jennifer Adams
Q: A while ago, I bought some beautiful linen-colored drapery panels for my apartment, but now they have some stains and are very dusty. When I was a kid, I remember my grandma having her fancy draperies sent out for cleaning. Is there an easier way I can do this myself? - M.P. A: You'd be amazed at how much dust collects on draperies (and your walls, too), even though they are vertical. Cleaning your drapes and all window treatments will help reduce allergens and odors in your home, as well as lengthen the life of the fabric.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2016
Q: My husband and I are considering buying a house in a great location, but it seems very open to the street. The windows let in lots of light, except there is no privacy - anybody going by can see right in, especially the kitchen. And my husband and I love to cook together and sometimes we get "playful. " I'd hate to live with all the curtains closed. We want this house, but I love our "moments" together, and I don't want to lose them. - M&M 4ever! A: It's wonderful to find playful moments whenever you can, not just around your anniversary or Valentine's Day. Celebrating cooking and food together is very romantic, and I would also hate for you to lose that because you feel on display in a new house.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2015
Q: I am a new owner of a Queen Anne Victorian. Although the furniture is Victorian, I do not want to use Victorian window coverings because the house has its original wavy glass windows and newly restored window surrounds. The windows are double hung, and only the bottom half would need to be covered at night for privacy. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated. - L.B. A: This sounds like a fun project. And there is no reason you have to stay true to the heavy Victorian style for your window treatments.
NEWS
August 22, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
New York-based window treatment maker The Shade Store is leasing a two-story building at 1725 Chestnut St. in Center City, which will house its first Philadelphia-area showroom. The store, which opens Friday, will occupy the first floor of the 4,000-square-foot building that previously housed a succession of restaurants, including a Famous Dave's barbecue, said Larry Steinberg, a senior vice president at real estate brokerage CBRE, who brokered the lease. "For their first foray into the Philadelphia-area market, they chose Center City," Steinberg said.
REAL_ESTATE
February 17, 2013 | By Joanne McLaughlin, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE EDITOR
In winter, my parkside property has a stark beauty. Male cardinals perch vibrantly red on bare tree branches. Tall grasses sway, bleached of their summertime green to a pale wheat color. On a recent frost-dusted day, a tiny black-and-white bird sat under the snow-covered overhang of my front-yard feeder. Outside, a calm had descended. Inside, well, it was pretty darn chilly. Not absolute-zero frigid, just cold enough to merit two pairs of socks, fuzzy slippers, two shirts, a cardigan, and a down vest.
NEWS
April 18, 2012
ROLFE NEILL WAS the first editor of the Daily News after the sale to Knight Newspapers Inc. more than 40 years ago. A master of promotion and branding, one of his first acts as editor was to demand that the building at Broad and Callowhill streets bear the name of both newspapers above the entrance. Until then, the Daily News was effectively a tenant in its own headquarters – in the Inquirer Building. And it was done. In fact, the message was so clear that the simple block letters of the Daily News logo were visually dominant over the fussy gothic script of the Inquirer's.
REAL_ESTATE
October 21, 2007 | By Al Heavens, Inquirer Columnist
When is landscape lighting not just about lighting? When it becomes an important ingredient of curb appeal, says a lighting company "outdoor living expert" who contacted me recently. This was just the latest snowball in the avalanche of story pitches I've been getting from manufacturers trying to offer their products as routes out of the real estate slowdown. So, please, disregard the market forces affecting residential real estate - tighter credit, too much inventory, overproduction of new homes, too many flippers invading and then fleeing, and the fact that most Americans seemed to think they were living in cash registers and now the till is practically empty and the bill is due. Go buy some lights.
LIVING
June 14, 2002 | By Claire Whitcomb FOR THE INQUIRER
Philadelphia native Sheila Bridges believes that with a little planning, a few flea-market finds, and several gallons of carefully chosen paint, you can turn any house into a place of calm and comfort. And you can achieve that goal even if you don't think you have the money to decorate. Her new book, Furnishing Forward: A Practical Guide to Furnishing for a Lifetime (Bulfinch Press, $40), distills her considerable wisdom. Bridges' ideas are sought by celebrity clients who range from novelist Tom Clancy to hip-hop musician/producer Sean "P. Diddy" Combs.
LIVING
September 14, 2001 | By Diane Goldsmith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With fall in the air, you might be thinking about sprucing up the inside of your home. After all, you'll be spending more time there in the coming months and want the space to be inviting. But with the economy in a slump, many folks are reluctant - or unable - to spend much. Can a modest outlay - such as the $600 federal income-tax rebate many families have received - begin to make a difference? You bet it can. Even if you can't afford a major room refurbishing, you can still get mileage out of, say, adding a pair of stylish rattan armchairs and an end table, or introducing new colors and textures into a room with such things as an area rug, pillows, accessories and plants, not to mention affordable window treatments and lighting.
NEWS
April 27, 1997 | By Nicole Pensiero, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Brian and Beth Dworkin decided to go into business for themselves nearly nine years ago, they had one clear idea of what they wanted their store to be. "We wanted to offer things that weren't available in every store in the mall," said Beth Dworkin. "It was our goal to be unique. " So the Dworkins shopped for an existing business to take over and settled on a home decorating store in Pitman. They changed the product mix of linens, window treatments and gifts to include items for babies and small children, and Distinctively Yours was born.
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