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NEWS
June 28, 2000 | by Lynn Hoffman, For the Daily News
Time to put on airs Even the best wines need it I had the gang over for a tasting last week. The wine was some light summery white stuff that you'll read about here in a week or two. It was pretty easy to decode - simple fruit flavors and crisp acidity. Lots of fun but not very challenging. When we were done tasting, I felt I owed them something, some wine that was worthy of their efforts, that told them how much I care. So I pulled something from the cellar, a bottle that had gotten some very nice reviews in the wine press.
FOOD
June 7, 2000 | by Lynn Hoffman, For the Daily News
Yeah, but is it wine? I'm enjoying a glass of Bordeaux with my friend the chef. Actually, enjoying is too frivolous a word. He is silent, eyes closed, leaning back in his chair, lower lip pulled in, head tilted slightly back to heaven. I am gaping off into the distance while the flavors bounce around from my tongue to my brain. The wine has layers and layers of taste and aroma. Deep and rich, it goes on forever. My wife walks by. She has seen this tableau before, so she doesn't bother to check either of us for a pulse.
FOOD
March 18, 2010
There are few miracle gadgets in the food world that actually work, but Vinturi's clever wine aerator is a notable exception. Just pour the wine through the stylish lucite funnel, listen to the gurgle as tiny holes infuse the vino with a speed-breathing equivalent of an hour in a decanter, and sip. The results can be startlingly clear - especially in a more rustic bottle, where the rough edges seem to be polished down, the fruit aromas become more...
FOOD
July 26, 2007
Most of these lower-alcohol wines from four Philadelphia restaurants are also available retail. Percentages reflect the alcohol content. Prices are per bottle. Meritage , 500 S. 20th St., 215-985-1922 2005 Montinore Riesling, Oregon, 12%, $36; also at selected state wine stores, $10.99. 2005 Orvieto Antinore "Campogrande," Italy, 11.5%, $34. 2004 Ch√Ęteau Bonnet (Bordeaux), France, 12%, $45; at selected state wine stores, $12.99. 707 , 707 Chestnut St., 215-922-7770 2006 Rudi Wiest Riesling, Germany, 10%, $47.50; at selected state wine stores by special order, $11.69.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2002 | By LYNN HOFFMAN For the Daily News
Don't you wish your grandfather made wine in the basement? Wouldn't you like to have the kind of close-knit neighborhood where people dropped by with a plate of lasagna, or you knew the person who baked your bread - and the one who made your wine? Fortunately, for all of the part-time, wannabe Italians, there's a chance to get in on the fun and the food of an urban, Italian-American neighborhood. It's called the Vendemmia - "Italy in the Park" - and this year marks the festival's 6th annual celebration of the grape harvest in South Philly.
NEWS
January 10, 2001 | by Lynn Hoffman, For the Daily News
There was a time, maybe 30 or 40 years ago, before the wine revival was in full swing, when a few brave souls sampled beyond the edges of the ordinary. Hard as it is to believe now, cream sherry was one of the exotic and daring drinks of the late '60s. (If you dig out an old copy of Gourmet magazine, you may see a half-page ad for one of the brands.) The drink, as I remember it, had a concentrated nutty flavor, a thick texture and a musky, raisiny finish. Unfortunately, it was also a little too sweet.
FOOD
September 20, 2000 | by Lynn Hoffman, For the Daily News
I came across three eccentric, delicious red wines in the last few weeks, wines that had some quirky characteristic that made them stand out from the crowd of low- to-medium priced wines. What they had in common was that they each seemed to call out for meat from the grill, some slab of beef or chop of lamb to ground their high-flying flavors. Now I have to admit a prejudice. I love my grill. I have nurtured its flavor and my technique for years. I would cook my kid's oatmeal on it if I could figure out how. I do make Thanksgiving's turkey on it. I have three different kinds of wood for smoking and a little homemade censer for smoking herbs.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2007 | By NATALIE HAUGHTON Los Angeles Daily News
With the high price of gas taking a chunk out of budgets these days, entertaining at home rather than at a restaurant may ease the strain. An impromptu appetizer-wine party is a good way to gather friends, add a little spice to life and have some fun. It's incredibly easy to pull off if you enlist some help from the array of quality products now available at supermarkets and specialty stores. You don't have to make everything yourself - or feel stress or guilt about serving ready-made items.
NEWS
June 19, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Everyone expects the cork on the bubbly to pop. But the whole bottle? In the realm of Pennsylvania's multibillion dollar liquor business, it was like a comet sighting. Suddenly, glass bottles of sparkling wine were exploding. In the stores. In the halls of the Liquor Control Board headquarters. On someone's kitchen counter. Eight incidents so far, officials say. So the LCB is issuing what may be its first warning ever to consumers about a potentially explosive shipment of wine.
FOOD
July 12, 2000 | by Lynn Hoffman, For the Daily News
We're in the middle of the outdoor eating season. Bags of smelly briquets are being toted home, gas grills are popping on with a roar and picnic baskets are being packed all across the Delaware Valley. If you're hosting one of these meals or attending one as a gracious guest, you may be wondering what wines to offer or bring. Even those of us whose idea of outdoor dining is a table at the Four Seasons next to the window are finding ourselves more and more likely to open a bottle of wine for outdoor drinking.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By Madison Russ, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - The Senate approved a bill Wednesday that would let Pennsylvania consumers have wine shipped directly to their homes. The measure, which now heads to the House, allows all wineries to obtain a permit to ship any quantity. Under current law, out-of-state retailers have only been allowed to send wine to a state-run liquor store for residents to pick up. The GOP-led House could vote on the measure as early as next week, said House Republicans spokesman Steve Miskin. Though the bill has support in both parties, drama unfolded on the Senate floor when it came up for debate Wednesday.
NEWS
June 12, 2015
BUZZ: Hey, Marnie, it's supposed to be in the 90s this weekend. That's ice-cold beer weather for me, but what do wine drinkers like you sip? Marnie: There are lots of options, and we chill them down, too - typically white wines, like Riesling and vinho verde, pinot grigio and sauvignon blanc. Whether you're a beer or wine drinker, it's natural to reach for the coldest drinks when you're overheated. The wines that taste best coldest are almost always light-bodied whites that come from cold places, but sometimes include sparkling wines and roses.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2015 | By Sally McCabe, For The Inquirer
Water your trees. Trees do best with at least an inch of rain a week. Practically speaking, this means five gallons of water applied slowly to the roots, either with a dripping hose or a five-gallon bucket with small holes drilled around the bottom. Once a week is good for street trees, but double it for trees planted in the last year. And because water weighs about eight pounds per gallon, skip the gym that day. Plant sweet potatoes. Every year, my friend Victor trades me sweet potato slips for tomato plants.
FOOD
May 22, 2015
Craig LaBan: I've been doing some eating - some fantastic ( see my three-bell rave on the fine farm-to-table revamp of the Mainland Inn in Harleysville), and some not great at all ( see my Sunday take on Chinatown's new Bonchon , the Korean fried-chicken franchise that earned a rare "no bell" rating). In other news, we were all extremely concerned to learn that chef Eli Kulp of Fork, High Street on Market, and a.Kitchen was seriously injured in last week's horrific Amtrak accident.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | BY BARBARA LAKER & STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writers lakerb@phillynews.com, 215-854-5933
CAMOY HONEGAN was on the verge of nothingness a month ago. No home. No money. No way to finish college. "I would have had to quit," she told the Daily News yesterday. "I couldn't focus. I was at my breaking point. " Then Honegan's advisor at Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn told her she should talk to Derrick Griffith, dean of student affairs and enrollment management there. She did. And Griffith, or "Griff" as friends called him, picked up the phone and worked his magic.
NEWS
April 10, 2015
BU ZZ: Hey Marnie, what's the meaning behind all the different shapes of wine bottles? Marnie: Interesting question, Buzz. The vast majority of wines come in one of four classic bottle shapes. Each one traces its roots to one of the world's most famous wine regions. Buzz: OK, give me a lesson. Marnie: Bordeaux-style bottles, which are the most common, are narrow, cylindrical and high-shouldered. Burgundy-style bottles are wider with long, sloped shoulders, and most often used for chardonnay, pinot noir and Rhone blends.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | BY MARNIE OLD & DON RUSSELL & GAR JOSEPH, For the Daily News Daily News Staff Writer
Editor's note: Beer or wine? We posed that question to Don Russell, whose "Joe Sixpack" beer column appears weekly here, and Marnie Old, a local sommelier and wine author who writes the "Cheap Buzz" column in the Daily News with Assistant Managing Editor Gar "Buzz" Joseph. With Buzz as referee, let the games begin. B UZZ: Hey, Marnie, I read that you're going to debate Pennsylvania beer vs. Pennsylvania wine on Tuesday at World Cafe Live. Marnie: Yes, it's a "people's choice" dinner during Philly Wine Week to determine which drink is the best food partner, loosely based on my first book, He Said Beer, She Said Wine . Buzz: How's it work?
NEWS
February 7, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Back in September, dry Haddonfield became one of a growing number of New Jersey municipalities where local wineries can sell their wines at local businesses. Jersey Java & Teas was first to host one of the so-called wine outlets, which require state permission. The restaurants MiaMare and Little Tuna followed. Come Saturday, for one afternoon from 1 to 4, glasses will be tipped all around the downtown district. They're calling it "Haddonfield Uncorked," a first-of-its-kind event for the historic borough, which elected to go dry more than 140 years ago. In addition to the three businesses that are permanent outlets for three South Jersey winemakers, a dozen others via one-day festival permits will host local wineries, which on Saturday will offer tastings and sell bottles.
FOOD
December 26, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
For many, sparkling-wine season comes only in December and is divided into two worlds: a small group of old-reliable big names, and a vast world of unknowns that may intrigue, but are too unfamiliar to risk a once-a-year purchase that rarely comes cheap. This year, we asked five local wine experts for guidance to open your world of bubbles with picks for splurge and value bottles. Not surprisingly, many are not the usual famous labels - but "grower" Champagnes (produced by the same estate that grows the grapes)
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