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FOOD
April 29, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
So our supper begins. It hasn't begun so humbly in days, various feasts and celebrations having spirited us to finer tables, in one case concluding in the take-home gift of a hollow dark-chocolate pig commemorating the birthday of a friend born in the Year of the Pig. One sprawling dinner in an Old City bistro included a passed hors d'oeuvre of tiny potato blinis topped with a bud of house-cured salmon, exquisite and sweet. Another, in a cozy townhouse dining room, was an homage to spring foraging - a mince of wild ramps beneath the pecorino in tender ravioli; and baby fava beans slick beside spongy morels in the rabbit dish.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
WHEN IS Atlantic City's famed Boardwalk not a Boardwalk? This weekend, when it will be transformed into the world's largest wine bar. Tomorrow and Sunday, the Great Wood Way will be an oenophile's fantasyland as the first Do AC Boardwalk Wine Promenade is staged along the oceanside pedestrian thoroughfare. "We have created a really unique event that celebrates the beauty and excitement of the Boardwalk through the lens of food and wine," offered Leslie Sbrocco , the TV wine expert ("The Today Show," PBS' "Check Please!"
FOOD
March 4, 2010 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
There should be little surprise about what's on the menu at Queen Village's Hoof + Fin (617 S. Third St., 215-925-3070), which filled the former Gayle last month. Owner Lucas Manteca, who owns Quahog's Seafood Shack and Sea Salt in Stone Harbor and is chef for Cape May Resort, has opted for a rustic look at his South American-influenced BYOB grill: suspended clear lightbulbs, butcher-block tables, and assorted tchotchkes. Prices are aimed at the neighborhood; figure on under $20 for main courses.
FOOD
February 28, 2008 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Pearl , a pan-Asian restau-bar three years in the works, has opened in a former Little Pete's at 1904 Chestnut St. The project from David, Scott and Sean Stein of Old City's Red Sky, with lawyer/club promoter Brett Perloff, is a two-story affair designed by DAS Architects (Rae, Rat's, Le Bec-Fin). First floor includes a white dining room and bar. There are a dark lounge, DJ booth, plus private room overlooking Chestnut Street on the second floor; four large "pearls," or seating areas, allow for bottle service for groups.
FOOD
January 15, 2009 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Darlene Boline Moseng, who did catering and private chef-ing, is into her third week of A La Maison (53 W. Lancaster Ave., Ardmore, 484-412-8009), a rustic French BYOB in the Main Line storefront that was Jewel of India. Moseng, a graduate of the Restaurant School, is keeping it traditional on a blackboard menu - coq au vin, short ribs, steak frites (dinner entrees: $21 to $28). She's backed in the kitchen by Maurice deRamus (Zen in Northern Liberties, Kujaku on the Parkway), and Marabella's alumna Lori Sexton is running the front of the house.
FOOD
April 9, 2009 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Another steak house is coming down the pike. Win and Sutida Somboonsong - who own Mikado Thai Pepper in Ardmore, Flavor in Wayne, Azie in Media, and Teikoku in Newtown Square - signed a deal for the old Roux 3 site (4755 West Chester Pike) by the United Artists cineplex in Newtown Square. Parker's Prime , a steak house named after the Somboonsongs' youngest child, Parker, will have a wine list put together by winemaker/importer Gino Razzi of Penns Woods Winery. A late summer/early fall 2009 opening is planned.
NEWS
August 30, 2009 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Economic forces continue to pummel the restaurant industry, with more than three dozen closings in the region this year. Yet, surprisingly, at least as many eager opportunists have stepped in, checkbooks in hand, to open new ones. "Restaurateurs are, almost to a fault, optimists," said Michael O'Halloran, who two weeks ago opened Kong, a Chinese bar-restaurant in Northern Liberties with a low-priced, small-plate menu. But there is a difference: Unlike the barn-size, $10 million-plus projects like the plush steak houses that were the norm as recently as a year ago, restaurants now on the books tend to have fewer seats, lower prices, and less lofty ambitions.
FOOD
October 19, 2006 | By Karen Heller INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Michael McCaulley is a successful Philadelphia sommelier, which means he makes more than $70,000 annually working three jobs and almost 70 hours a week under conditions that, at times, would seem risible anywhere else in the nation. "From a restaurant standpoint, it's archaic how we buy wine," McCaulley says of operating in a state where the sole seller is the beloved Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board. He's beverage director at Tria, the popular Rittenhouse Square wine bar; sommelier at Northern Italian steak restaurant Davio's; and co-owner of Tria Fermentation School, which opened this week and offers classes and wine tastings.
NEWS
May 25, 2007 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What seemed worse for the young woman was not her alleged drugging and rape by Jeffrey Marsalis, but her decision to get an abortion after becoming pregnant as a result of the alleged assault. The woman, then a 26-year-old pharmaceutical rep living in Bethlehem, Pa., wanted to be a good Catholic, and nearly every time the abortion was mentioned, she welled-up in tears on the stand yesterday. "I was embarrassed and ashamed," she said as she sat in a wheelchair with her left leg propped up from a recent surgery.
NEWS
July 7, 2005
Look to Del. to learn how to fix State Stores I read with great interest your article on the "improvements" in the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board in recent years ("Toasting the bottom line: State Stores, now offering better wines, more hours and more sites, took in nearly $1.5 billion in the last year," June 30.) I agree that the recent changes have made some aspects of wine purchasing in Pennsylvania a little more digestible than in years past. However, overall the changes are far inferior to the quality, pricing and service that I receive from stores in Delaware.
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