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Wine Coolers

NEWS
May 27, 1987 | By DAVE BITTAN, Daily News Staff Writer
"Wednesday at Midnight" on WYSP (FM/94) features a special two-hour "Rolling Stone Magazine 20th Anniversary Salute. " The show includes some of the best live rock performances recorded over the past two decades. Superstars to be heard include Janis Joplin, Cream, Jefferson Airplane, the Beatles - and, of course, the Rolling Stones. At 7 tonight, on Mike Wolf's "7 O'clock Sideshow" on WYSP, you'll hear side 1 of "90125" by Yes. If you're a relative or friend of Camden's Richard Sterban or Philly's Joe Bonsall, a Frankford High grad, tune in tonight at 11 to the "Larry King Show" on WIP (AM/610)
NEWS
September 17, 1994 | By WALTER E. WILLIAMS
I love robust California zinfandels, merlots and cabernet sauvignons. But you may have as strong a passion for chardonnay, wine coolers and beer. I love biking 20, 40 and 60 miles on my custom-made Klein, Campagnolo-fitted road bike. But you may hate biking and rather play tennis, golf or just watch television. How come there's no conflict between us on these strongly held values? The answer's easy. I drink my zinfandel and bike my 40 miles, and you down your wine coolers and play several sets of tennis.
NEWS
October 2, 1986 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A strike against a group of California wineries, including two of the nation's largest, apparently collapsed yesterday in the face of a threat by the wineries to hire permanent replacements for the strikers. Although union ballots on the wineries' contract offer still were being counted yesterday after voting in several wine-region cities, union leaders acknowledged that their members appeared ready to accept the wage cuts and other concessions demanded by the winemakers. "We may have lost this battle, but we'll never lose the war," said Lonnie Sloan, vice president of Local 186 of the winery workers' union.
FOOD
August 24, 1988 | By BARBARA GIBBONS, Special to the Daily News
For a real "cooler," drink water! When the weather's hot and you're thirsty, a sugary wine drink is more likely to make you hot and dry than it is to cool you off and quench your thirst. A cold beer or a gin and tonic will have the same heat-producing effect. Even sugary soda pop, lemonade and iced coffee can heat you up. Thirst is the body's natural mechanism for replacing fluid, and the closer a drink comes to calorie-free, the better choice it is as a summer drink. For pure refreshment and replenishment, nothing beats plain water, whether from the tap or bottle.
NEWS
December 27, 1990 | By Marguerite P. Jones, Special to The Inquirer
"Tis the season to be jolly. But the way people get jolly seems to be changing. Once alcohol flowed freely at holiday parties, and quarts of vodka, whiskey or rum were standard gifts for employees, clients and acquaintances. But with alcohol awareness increasing, many people in Bucks County will be drinking a little less this season. Throughout Pennsylvania, holiday alcohol consumption fell 4 percent between 1988 and 1989. In Bucks County, overall consumption dropped 2.3 percent, or by 39,411 gallons, between 1988 and 1989.
NEWS
June 26, 1998 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
Before last week, the last time I tasted hard cider, I was about 9. Granny was in the kitchen cooking up some possum stew, and Uncle Jed was out by the cee-ment pond, whittlin' his stick. Me and Cousin Jethro snuck into the root cellar and found Granny's jug, threateningly marked XXX. Talk about "bubblin' crude," that cider had us flying for the rest of the afternoon. My family, naturally unnerved by this boyhood episode, loaded up the truck and spirited me away to Pennsylvania, land of the America's most regressive booze laws.
NEWS
September 10, 1986 | By Lee Winfrey, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Brenner's new late-night television talk show didn't quite die during its premiere, but it certainly slipped into a coma. The most interesting thing about it was an injury to his guest the day before. If Brenner's new Nightlife series doesn't soon show some zip, an insomniac's favorite tick on the dial will be Channel 29 at 11 p.m., when WTAF is running this syndicated series each week night. Monday night's premiere was slow enough to make a speed freak drowsy. Brenner lucked out with his first guest, Chicago Bears quarterback Jim McMahon, who had sustained a shoulder separation in Sunday's game against the Cleveland Browns.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1986 | By LINI S. KADABA and MINNA JUNG, Daily News Staff Writers
Half a dozen three-piece-suited executives fumble through their briefcases, pausing to listen to the drone of flight information. One savors the last drag of his fourth cigarette as he settles into another half-hour wait in the USAir lounge at Philadelphia's International Airport. Slouching into his chair, another man yawns loudly and closes his eyes for a nap. A young girl, her nose pressed against the glass window, follows the slow descent of a DC-10. "Is our plane here yet, mommy?"
NEWS
July 21, 2011 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - Less than two weeks remain for proponents to gather support for posing a November ballot question that could turn this famously dry Shore town into a haven for fans of BYOB restaurants. If they can't gather 747 signatures from local voters by Aug. 3 to call for a referendum, the issue will recede, as it has several times before. If they are successful, the battle over whether to allow diners to bring their own beer and wine to eating establishments could shift into higher gear as foes campaign to preserve the town's family-first brand.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1996 | By Martha Groves, LOS ANGELES TIMES Inquirer staff writer Andrea Knox contributed to this story
Vintners in the famed Napa Valley get giddy when they contemplate the growing cadre of customers like Suzanne Patmore. The entertainment-industry executive used to spend no more than $10 for a bottle of wine. Yet there she was on a recent Friday night, clutching a wine magazine's list of recommendations as she strolled the aisles of a chic liquor shop in Los Angeles, scrutinizing labels on bottles marked $20 and up. "I'm sort of branching out to decent stuff, to things that actually rate on the Wine Spectator scale," said Patmore, 28, as she stood in line at Wally's.
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