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Wine Coolers

NEWS
June 3, 1987 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
After lying dormant for more than a month, Gov. Casey's proposal to make changes to the state liquor system will undergo its first Senate test on Monday. Senate Majority Leader John Stauffer (R., Chester-Montgomery) said yesterday that the Law and Justice Committee would take up the measure and probably make major revisions in the area of liquor-law enforcement. The General Assembly must create a new liquor system or re-establish the Liquor Control Board by June 30; otherwise, Pennsylvania, in theory, would become a "dry" state.
NEWS
March 12, 1987 | By Theresa Sullivan Barger, Special to The Inquirer
After receiving complaints from residents, Abington police and the state Liquor Control Board have closed two bars they believe were operating in two Crestmont homes for years. Police have charged Elijah Newman, 59, and Alberta Newman, 62, of the 2600 block of Lamott Avenue, with selling alcoholic beverages without a license. Arrested on similar charges were Harry E. Thompson, 61, of the 1600 block of Fairview Avenue, and Mable Stratton, 61, of the same address. Abington police Lt. John Livingood said township police and LCB agents began an undercover investigation after receiving complaints that bars were being operated in private homes.
NEWS
June 24, 1994 | by Scott Heimer, Daily News Staff Writer
What happens when police take "The Fifth"? No, not the amendment - the booze. Like, when they confiscate liquor from under-aged kids at the Jersey shore. Or when Pennsylvania State Police Liquor Control Enforcement agents seize a load of bootlegged booze bought by Philadelphians at the cheaper Jersey outlets on Admiral Wilson Boulevard in Camden and trunked over the Ben Franklin Bridge? Well, if it's a big-enough haul, the law enforcement boys find themselves not only in court as witnesses but in quarts, too - like, up to their necks in quarts.
NEWS
April 13, 1991 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
A two-day estate sale on the Main Line next weekend will offer bidders the chance to get items that once belonged to one of the most prominent families in the area, the Rushes. It is one of two sales that will begin next Saturday and run through the following day. The Main Line estate sale will be conducted by the Charles A. Whitaker Auction Co., starting at 10 a.m. next Saturday, at Sydenham, a 40-acre farm in Paoli that belonged to the late Deborah Norris Rush. In addition to 18th- and 19th-century furniture, silver, prints and paintings and textiles, many of them imported, the sale will include items from the Biddle and Brock families, to which Mrs. Rush was related.
NEWS
April 8, 1992 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It may have been fate or chance or tragic coincidence that put a young woman and her 4-year-old son in crime's grip on the night of June 28, 1990. The Stauffer brothers, their sister Hope and her son Mikey, all of Camden, stopped at two other bars that night before going to the Rosedale Tavern at 36th and Federal Streets to buy two six-packs of wine coolers. Hope Stauffer, 22, and her son stayed in the car while her brothers went inside. When they emerged 15 minutes later, the car was gone, Mikey was gone, Hope was gone.
NEWS
June 18, 1987 | By Patrisia Gonzales, Inquirer Staff Writer
James John Henderson, 27, of Voorhees, admitted yesterday that he killed a neighborhood acquaintance by putting a tree limb on her throat and stabbing her with a buck knife, and then left her body in the woods in Voorhees. Henderson's guilty plea to murder in Camden yesterday may have saved his life. Had he been tried and convicted of killing Kimberly A. Bracaliello, 17, who lived several blocks away from him, he might have faced the death penalty. Under his plea agreement, he would have to serve 35 years in prison before being eligible for parole.
NEWS
August 30, 2011 | By Mari A. Schaefer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Forget bread, milk, and eggs. It appears the region's residents rode out Hurricane Irene with booze. Whether the boost in business was for hosting hurricane parties or just hunkering down with a bit of Southern Comfort, sales at liquor stores were way up in the days approaching Irene. "We were reporting at some of our Philadelphia stores the wave of people we usually see during the December holiday season," said Stacey Witalec, spokesman for the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board.
SPORTS
April 13, 2013 | By Peter Mucha, Philly.com
Part 4 of a series about Philadelphia fans. Let's bust another Eagles myth. We already learned Philadelphia's only so-so for its percentage of pro football fans . We also learned the Eagles and Phillies have roughly the same size fan base . Now get this: The Eagles - with their history of tailgate-happy fans, a ban on beer sales after the snowball-hurling Bounty Bowl 2, and a courtroom at Veterans Stadium - are not...
FOOD
August 23, 1987 | The Inquirer staff
In this dog-eat-dog world of happy winners and downtrodden losers, pause for a moment to consider the avocado. It's one of the big winners. Consumer use of avocados has climbed 157 percent since the years 1971-75, says the Agriculture Department's annual report on what Americans are eating and how much. Fresh, sweet and low-fat are how USDA researchers describe the foods that are gaining favor with U.S. consumers. And as successful as the avocado has been, its success pales beside consumption figures for a few other products.
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