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NEWS
April 4, 2016 | By Craig LaBan, Restaurant Critic
I usually don't pay attention to celebrity wines. But the quality of some (see Wine Spectator's recent cover story on Sting's Tuscan wine, Il Palagio) has recently surged. The latest celeb vintner to make a splash will be familiar to college basketball fans. CBS sportcaster Jim Nantz, who's calling the Final Four and national championship game Monday, has put out a trio of surprisingly tasty Sonoma wines under the Calling label. The quality is no surprise, given that Nantz's partner, Peter Deutsch, is a veteran importer (CEO of W.J. Deutsch)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2009
Every so often, I come across a wine that's simply too delicious to be so inexpensive. And yet, here we've lucked into just such a juicy gem, the 2006 Amalaya from Bodega Colome in Argentina, which has been given a nearly 50 percent Chairman's Selection discount in Pennsylvania - despite a big 90-point rating from the Wine Spectator. I don't always agree with wine-mag ratings, but for $10, this is the real deal, a malbec-cabernet blend (with touches of syrah, tannat and bonarda)
NEWS
December 19, 2012 | By Bob Ecker, For The Inquirer
Today, upscale cruise ships are appealing to passengers who already appreciate wine and want to learn more about the global wine experience. Luxury vessels for years have been bringing aboard celebrated winemakers who interact with passengers, but now some are presenting stand-alone, state-of-the-art facilities paired with wine education programs, wine immersion classes, seminars, tastings, and extravagant wine dinners. Now Oceania Line, a cruise line that straddles the premium/luxury categories, offers wine fans La Reserve by Wine Spectator, the cruise industry's first professional shipboard wine tasting/educational facility.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1987 | By FREDERICK H. LOWE, Daily News Staff Writer
Paul Masson sells wine only when it's time, but Henry Wendt, chairman of SmithKline Beckman, makes wine at his Northern California vineyard only when he has the time. "All of our (Wendt and his wife, Holly) vacations are spent there . . . during big holidays such as Christmas, New Year's and Labor Day, we will wrap a week around them and go there . . . and when I am in California on a business trip, I try to stop there for at least a day," said Wendt, who spends most of his time running the $3.7-billion-a-year Philadelphia-based pharmaceutical company.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1995 | By Bruce Meyerson, ASSOCIATED PRESS Inquirer staff writer Andrea Knox contributed to this story
A proud father, Bill Sokolin was determined to set his newborn daughter on the right path. So in 1964, he bought the infant 100 cases of wine. Eighteen years later, that $2,000 investment in 1963 Taylor's Vintage Port had aged into a fine $90,000 college fund that easily covered four years at Tufts University. Hardly a fluke, said Sokolin, a veteran New York wine merchant who believes everyone's investment portfolio should include "liquid assets. " It may sound far-fetched to those not versed in the history of vineyards in France's Bordeaux region.
NEWS
May 27, 2005 | By Trevor M. Knox
The opinion the United States Supreme Court issued May 16 in Granholm v. Heald has prompted headlines ranging from "Interstate Wine Shipment Legal" to "In Vino Libertas. " Not so fast. Overreaching journalists are eager to fall off a wagon that has barely left the station. However, the decision will benefit people such as Frederic Burr, who, some 65 years after the repeal of Prohibition, wrote a letter to the editorial board of Wine Spectator, which complained, "It's ridiculous that I can buy a gun through the mail, but not a bottle of Caymus Special Selection.
NEWS
March 1, 2009 | By Jay Clarke FOR THE INQUIRER
For wine lovers, there's nothing like discovering new tastes of the grape. For cruise lovers, there's nothing like touring some of the most beautiful regions of the world. Combine the two, and you have a wine cruise - a happy blend that is attracting more and more travelers. "We love wine, and we love Europe," says Joan Carter of Destin, Fla., explaining why she and her husband, Stephen, chose a wine cruise as their very first sea voyage. "We had a wine event almost every day, and a wine dinner with pairings," Carter says of their seven-night Windstar cruise in the Mediterranean last year.
NEWS
September 5, 2004 | By Ken Dilanian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Maryse Meyre is bewildered. Her family has been successfully making wine for five generations here in France's world-famous Bordeaux region. But in the last few years, sales have crashed. "It's a catastrophe," she said as she escorted visitors through the fragrant winery, with its rooms full of oak barrels and shelves of vintages dating to 1929. "I don't understand, because we have changed nothing. On the contrary, the wine is better, because we have better technology. " That may be true, but it hasn't staved off a crisis in much of the French wine industry.
NEWS
December 2, 1988 | By Sam Gugino, Daily News Restaurant Critic
If you were asked to conjure up the image of an Italian family restaurant, you might envision checkered tablecloths, chianti bottles plugged with dripping candles and a squat mama in the kitchen turning out homespun favorites. Then there is the Sena family restaurant, La Famiglia. Instead of a dark and humble trattoria, La Famiglia is an elegant ristorante. It reminded me of an Italian villa, one whose owner has some sense of taste. Marble wall columns separate alternating wallpapered and exposed- brick walls.
FOOD
July 3, 1988 | By Ted Dziemianowicz, Special to The Inquirer
Quick now. Which California wine would you pick to wash down a spicy, marinated grilled salmon you had landed earlier the same day? Now, how about a white to go with a rosemary-roasted quail to be served at an elaborate wedding dinner? If a Napa Valley merlot with the salmon and a lush sauvignon blanc with the bird sound like awkward, or even terrible, combinations to you, you're clearly not the stuff of which a Wine Wizard is made. For those are exactly the inspired matches that distinguished Mike Kelly of Wilmington over 500 other entrants in the third annual California Wine Wizard competition, which concluded May 2 with Kelly claiming the title Grand Wizard of 1988.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 4, 2016 | By Craig LaBan, Restaurant Critic
I usually don't pay attention to celebrity wines. But the quality of some (see Wine Spectator's recent cover story on Sting's Tuscan wine, Il Palagio) has recently surged. The latest celeb vintner to make a splash will be familiar to college basketball fans. CBS sportcaster Jim Nantz, who's calling the Final Four and national championship game Monday, has put out a trio of surprisingly tasty Sonoma wines under the Calling label. The quality is no surprise, given that Nantz's partner, Peter Deutsch, is a veteran importer (CEO of W.J. Deutsch)
FOOD
December 20, 2012 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Sparkling wine producers would pop their corks with joy if we embraced the notion that Champagne and its other bubbly brethren can be drunk all year, not just on New Year's Eve. I'm all for it. After all, fine Champagne should be quality wine before the fizz. ("The bubbles are a fact," says David Moore of Moore Brothers, "but they do not define the great wines. ") But there's no denying the urge is stronger when the weather turns as cold as an ice bucket and the skies grow steely: A golden shimmer of bubbles rising in our glasses lifts the spirits, too. What do I hope for each year?
NEWS
December 19, 2012 | By Bob Ecker, For The Inquirer
Today, upscale cruise ships are appealing to passengers who already appreciate wine and want to learn more about the global wine experience. Luxury vessels for years have been bringing aboard celebrated winemakers who interact with passengers, but now some are presenting stand-alone, state-of-the-art facilities paired with wine education programs, wine immersion classes, seminars, tastings, and extravagant wine dinners. Now Oceania Line, a cruise line that straddles the premium/luxury categories, offers wine fans La Reserve by Wine Spectator, the cruise industry's first professional shipboard wine tasting/educational facility.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2009
Every so often, I come across a wine that's simply too delicious to be so inexpensive. And yet, here we've lucked into just such a juicy gem, the 2006 Amalaya from Bodega Colome in Argentina, which has been given a nearly 50 percent Chairman's Selection discount in Pennsylvania - despite a big 90-point rating from the Wine Spectator. I don't always agree with wine-mag ratings, but for $10, this is the real deal, a malbec-cabernet blend (with touches of syrah, tannat and bonarda)
NEWS
March 1, 2009 | By Jay Clarke FOR THE INQUIRER
For wine lovers, there's nothing like discovering new tastes of the grape. For cruise lovers, there's nothing like touring some of the most beautiful regions of the world. Combine the two, and you have a wine cruise - a happy blend that is attracting more and more travelers. "We love wine, and we love Europe," says Joan Carter of Destin, Fla., explaining why she and her husband, Stephen, chose a wine cruise as their very first sea voyage. "We had a wine event almost every day, and a wine dinner with pairings," Carter says of their seven-night Windstar cruise in the Mediterranean last year.
FOOD
April 10, 2008 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Gino Razzi has heard his share of wisecracks. Making wine in Pennsylvania, it seems, has long been a grand cru invitation to cynicism. But the double-takes acquire an extra snap, and the remarks a deeper chuckle of disbelief, when I tell people I'm excited about Penns Woods, Razzi's ambitious new winery in Eddystone. This blue-collar burg, slipped into an industrial zone between I-95 and the Delaware River, just beyond the airport and the Boeing plant, doesn't exactly conjure images of the Napa Valley.
NEWS
May 27, 2005 | By Trevor M. Knox
The opinion the United States Supreme Court issued May 16 in Granholm v. Heald has prompted headlines ranging from "Interstate Wine Shipment Legal" to "In Vino Libertas. " Not so fast. Overreaching journalists are eager to fall off a wagon that has barely left the station. However, the decision will benefit people such as Frederic Burr, who, some 65 years after the repeal of Prohibition, wrote a letter to the editorial board of Wine Spectator, which complained, "It's ridiculous that I can buy a gun through the mail, but not a bottle of Caymus Special Selection.
NEWS
September 5, 2004 | By Ken Dilanian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Maryse Meyre is bewildered. Her family has been successfully making wine for five generations here in France's world-famous Bordeaux region. But in the last few years, sales have crashed. "It's a catastrophe," she said as she escorted visitors through the fragrant winery, with its rooms full of oak barrels and shelves of vintages dating to 1929. "I don't understand, because we have changed nothing. On the contrary, the wine is better, because we have better technology. " That may be true, but it hasn't staved off a crisis in much of the French wine industry.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1995 | By Bruce Meyerson, ASSOCIATED PRESS Inquirer staff writer Andrea Knox contributed to this story
A proud father, Bill Sokolin was determined to set his newborn daughter on the right path. So in 1964, he bought the infant 100 cases of wine. Eighteen years later, that $2,000 investment in 1963 Taylor's Vintage Port had aged into a fine $90,000 college fund that easily covered four years at Tufts University. Hardly a fluke, said Sokolin, a veteran New York wine merchant who believes everyone's investment portfolio should include "liquid assets. " It may sound far-fetched to those not versed in the history of vineyards in France's Bordeaux region.
NEWS
December 2, 1988 | By Sam Gugino, Daily News Restaurant Critic
If you were asked to conjure up the image of an Italian family restaurant, you might envision checkered tablecloths, chianti bottles plugged with dripping candles and a squat mama in the kitchen turning out homespun favorites. Then there is the Sena family restaurant, La Famiglia. Instead of a dark and humble trattoria, La Famiglia is an elegant ristorante. It reminded me of an Italian villa, one whose owner has some sense of taste. Marble wall columns separate alternating wallpapered and exposed- brick walls.
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