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NEWS
July 8, 2012 | By Phillip Leyman and FOR THE INQUIRER
As I drove down the winding country road in the Demone Valley of northeastern Sicily, passing through small towns and villages with old rustic farmhouses in the distance, there was a feeling of growing anticipation and excitement. Even though I had made this trip only once before almost 10 years earlier with my wife, everything looked very familiar. With Mount Etna, the active volcano known as a muntagna by the Sicilians, looming in the distance, Uncle Tony and I made our way along the last leg of our trip from Fiumafreddo to Linguaglossa.
FOOD
September 28, 1986 | The Inquirer staff
The quality of wine is often judged by the type of closure that keeps it in the bottle. Those sealed with screw tops tend to be inexpensive and unappreciated by wine aficionados. On the other hand, wines bottled with a cork often get an automatic sense of legitimacy - regardless of whether the respect is deserved. Bad wine should not be attributed simply to the presence of a screw top, according to a presentation at the recent annual convention of the American Chemical Society, held in Anaheim, Calif.
NEWS
March 19, 1987 | By Calvin Trillin
This supposedly took place at a particularly fancy restaurant somewhere in the United States - the sort of restaurant I've always referred to as La Maison de la Casa House, Continental Cuisine. The wine waiter - or the sommelier, as the folks at La Maison de la Casa House would certainly have called him - arrived at the table with the expensive bottle of wine that had just been ordered. He displayed the label, opened the bottle, placed the cork on the table in front of the customer who had done the ordering, and poured an inch or so of wine to be tasted.
NEWS
May 21, 2000 | By John V.R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There's no need for Trumpets to toot its own horn, for I'll happily do it instead. The Kennett Square restaurant with lovely Victorian setting opened six weeks ago in what used to be Samantha's Cafe, offering splendid contemporary cuisine paired with the appropriate wines. The entire restaurant is non-smoking, even the attractive bar, which may mean that the beautiful decor will remain pristine for as long as I hope the restaurant survives. The menu is uncommonly appealing and dishes are prepared with considerable accomplishment.
NEWS
June 6, 1986 | By Dan Rottenberg
One day in the fall of 1980 - shortly after Vartan Gregorian had been passed over for the presidency of the University of Pennsylvania, and shortly after I'd written a column on the subject - I was having lunch in a Center City restaurant when a waiter appeared at my table with a glass of white wine. "Compliments of a friend," he said, motioning across the room. I looked in the direction he indicated and saw Gregorian's goateed face grinning at me. Now, put yourself in my place: How would you react?
FOOD
October 1, 2000 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
In the Technicolor glow of stained-glass poultry, Rose Parrotta is stomping her feet to Johnny Cash, reliving her wilder days in the apple orchards of New York and filling her Happy Rooster with an infectious energy boost. She welcomes friends to her little restaurant in a playful headlock, leading them around the thick brass bar pole. Even diners unknown to this diamond-studded dynamo get a blast of her charisma. She preens like Vanna White beside her ambitious chalkboard menu, discoursing on everything from her hand-scribbled boutique wine list ("people want forward fruit, but I won't give it to them!"
NEWS
March 11, 1992 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Robert M. Jacobs Sr., a wine and liquor sales representative who serviced a number of Philadelphia's top lounges and nightclubs, died Sunday. He was 67 and lived in West Philadelphia. "My father was a great sales representative, a natural who knew how to move a product. He was as comfortable with the owner of a corner tavern as he was with the operator of a top-flight lounge," said a son, Robert Jr. "He represented Calvert whiskey and the Bartolomeo Pio line of wines. " Jacobs grew up in the Haddington section of West Philadelphia, attended Overbrook High School, and served in the South Pacific with the Army Air Corps during World War II. He was a Philadelphia police officer during the 1950s, working out of the 12th District station house at 65th Street and Woodland Avenue.
FOOD
October 11, 1989 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Wine is often overlooked as a cooking ingredient. But just as a sip of wine can enhance the taste of the food it accompanies, wine can also add a flavorful dimension when added to a dish during cooking. Some cooks insist on using the same wine that will be served at the table, but that's not an issue to become preoccupied with. The general rule is simply to use a cooking wine similar to or compatible with the one you're served. The quality of the cooking wine, however, is important.
NEWS
December 22, 2011 | Staff Report
A tractor trailer hauling wine broke an axle after smashing into one of the metal bollards that rim Philadelphia City Hall early this morning. A liquid was flowing underneath the large truck, but it was unclear if it was wine. The incident occurred sometime around 4:30 a.m., according to police. The tractor trailer, fully loaded with wine, was apparently rounding City Hall when its rear axle struck the bollard, and the trailer became disabled partially on the pavement.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2012
Buzz: I was down the Shore last weekend, lying on the beach. My brother opened his beer cooler and instead of a sixpack, he had a bunch of little juice boxes — of wine. What's the world coming to? Marnie: You have to get with the times, Buzz. There has been a revolution in wine packaging in the last 10 years. Buzz: Why abandon the old-fashioned bottle and cork? Marnie: Juices used to come in glass, too, but now it's all cartons and pouches. Wine is just grape juice, so why not put it a more convenient container?
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