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Wine

FOOD
November 21, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
According to a recent poll by Food & Wine magazine, 58 percent of Americans who drink wine on Thanksgiving (and that's 86 percent of drinkers) go for pinot noir. It's no wonder, since that mid-weight red is among the most flexible choices to handle the wide range of flavors on the table. But which pinot to purchase? I side with the 68 percent of those surveyed who go for American for this definitively all-American holiday. And in years past, I've gravitated toward the earthier, tarter bottles from Oregon.
NEWS
November 12, 2014
P ATRICK MICHAEL Carrow, 46, of Bella Vista, is owner and creative director of Patrick Michael Accessories, in North Philly. Carrow creates one-of-a-kind handbags, clutches, wallets and wine totes from discontinued fabrics he sources from textile mills overseas. The business, started in 2009, sells from a website, at craft shows and at boutiques. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for the biz? A: I've always collected beautiful fabrics, and one night I stacked all the fabrics and, after running errands, came back and saw this harmony of color, print and texture.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2014
B UZZ: Hey, Marnie, why do wines need to rest before they're ready to drink? Marnie: Most wines are ready to drink immediately, Buzz. Certainly all wines in your favorite bargain category. If it's on the shelf for less than $25, there's no need to age it any further, so drink up. Buzz: No, I mean when you make wine, not when you buy it. My Italian father-in-law makes his own homemade red. I helped him crush grapes in September, so when we visited last weekend I wanted to drink the batch we made.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | Michelle Singletary, Washington Post Writers Group
I T TOOK a few years of running a financial ministry at my church before I realized that the program needed to be revamped. Initially, I would have participants start with creating a budget. But by the time we got midway through the 10-month schedule, far too many people hadn't done theirs. So I spent one session probing why folks couldn't finish - or even start - their budgets. For the most part, it all came down to fear. One 50-year-old woman clarified it for me. "I'm ashamed," she said, shaking and choking back tears.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2014
  B   UZZ: I had enough French in high school to know blanc means white. But grapes, like sauvignon blanc, are green. Shouldn't it be sauvignon vert ? Marnie: That's a good question, Buzz. Green wine grapes likely weren't dubbed "white" because they look white but to emphasize their contrast with purple grapes, which are so dark they look black on the vine. Buzz: So, you're saying winemakers think in black and white? Marnie: I guess they must, since that's how they historically named grape varieties in Europe.
NEWS
September 3, 2014
ISSUE | SPORTS INJURIES Coach attentive On behalf of six other student athletes, our experience in playing for Craig Reed's under-17 soccer club team in Chester County does not in any way match the player-trauma allegations in a recent lawsuit ("In Chesco, a soccer lawsuit," Aug. 25). Reed is a great coach who cares about our welfare. He is always positive. Collectively, we have played for the coach anywhere from four to seven years, and we were on the team with the player who sued.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
  B   UZZ: Hey, Marnie, I'm glad I ran into you. We have our family reunion barbecue every Labor Day in Fairmount Park, and this year I'm supposed to bring the wine. Any suggestions? Marnie: Sure thing, Buzz. I recommend sticking to chilled, lightweight wines when the occasion involves drinking in broad daylight. This goes double for warm weather, so steer away from the heavier reds. Think white or pink, and bring a cooler. Buzz: Oh, I never leave home without a cooler.
NEWS
August 23, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
The lawyer who peddled fine wines from his Main Line home made out with probation and community service. His wine might not fare as well. Police want to destroy the 2,426 bottles they seized in January from Arthur Goldman's Malvern home, the typical fate for bootleg booze. But this collection is not a typical bounty. It's far more valuable. Goldman is fighting to keep it, and wine enthusiasts say the thought of its being dumped is hard to swallow, an example of how Pennsylvania's antiquated liquor laws frustrate connoisseurs and seed a black market for alcohol unavailable in state stores.
FOOD
August 22, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
About a decade ago, when Melissa Monosoff was working as a sommelier at the Four Seasons, she faced plenty of tests - some from the Court of Master Sommeliers, where she obtained the highest possible certification, and others tableside, from skeptical customers. "A lot of times I did have to prove myself," she recalled. "I'd approach people and say, 'I see you're looking at the wine list. Can I help you?' And they'd say, 'Yes. If you could get the sommelier, that'd be great.' " Since then, the city's wine landscape has evolved, and more women are assuming prestigious sommelier posts than ever before.
NEWS
June 20, 2014
Buzz: Hey Marnie. Yesterday was the hottest day so far this year, which made me wonder: Why do people ice down their white wines, but not reds? Is it the only way to make them taste good? Marnie: No, Buzz, not at all. Other wine styles are routinely served cold too - sparkling wines and roses, dessert wines and even most fortified wines. The question should really be why we don't chill red wines - they are the exception to the rule. Think about it: Almost all drinks are served cold because it makes them seem more refreshing.
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