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Winnie Mandela

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NEWS
September 19, 1990 | By Rick Lyman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The South African government plans to put Winnie Mandela on trial for kidnapping and assault in a 19-month-old case for which one of her former bodyguards has already been sentenced to death, it was announced yesterday. Mandela, the controversial wife of African National Congress Deputy President Nelson Mandela, will be charged with taking part in the beatings of four young black men brought to her house in December 1988 on suspicion of being police informers. The youngest of the four was later found dead, but Mandela is not accused of his murder.
NEWS
January 1, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Anti-apartheid activist Winnie Mandela was released from jail yesterday for the second time in eight days, but was warned that she would be re-arrested if she again defied a government ban and returned to her Soweto home. She was detained Monday as she tried to drive to her home in the black township of Soweto, outside Johannesburg. She has repeatedly defied government attempts to silence her and keep her out of the Johannesburg area. The court freed her on $200 bail yesterday and ordered her to abide by the government order curbing her movements.
NEWS
February 19, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
South Africa yesterday temporarily dropped charges against black activist Winnie Mandela until a court rules on her challange to an order banning her from her family home. Under the country's tough internal-security laws for blacks, Mandela had been forbidden to enter Johannesburg or the nearby black township of Soweto, where her family has its home. Witwatersrand Attorney General Klaus von Lieres und Wilkau said he would withdraw the charges because Mandela was challenging the banning order in the Supreme Court.
NEWS
February 16, 1989 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Staff Writer
Winnie Mandela and her young bodyguards were linked to a murder yesterday when South African police announced they had identified a body as that of a black teenager who was allegedly beaten in the Mandela home. As Mandela consulted yesterday with her imprisoned husband, Nelson Mandela, police said they were opening a murder investigation because the decomposed body of Stompie Mokhetsi Seipei, 14, bore stab wounds. Winnie Mandela has acknowledged that Seipei and three young black men were taken to her Soweto home by her bodyguards on Dec. 29, but she has said she was protecting them from sexual abuse by a white Methodist minister.
NEWS
June 24, 1986 | Daily News Wire Services
Defying South African emergency laws, black nationalist leader Winnie Mandela has called for international sanctions against Pretoria, saying they were the only way to fight "an immoral . . . ungodly" regime. Mandela, in her first television interview since South Africa imposed a state of emergency on June 12, said sanctions were the "last door open to us" to exert pressure on the government. She was interviewed secretly in Johannesburg's black township of Soweto by Britain's commercial Granada television company, which said it smuggled the film out of South Africa in defiance of emergency reporting restrictions.
NEWS
March 2, 1995 | By Glenn Burkins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a move that some called unprecedented in South Africa, police yesterday raided the Soweto home of President Nelson Mandela's estranged wife, Winnie, carting away a "large quantity" of documents that allegedly link her to a kickback scheme involving the construction of low-income houses. The raid was the latest incident in a recent string of allegations and political embarrassments involving Winnie Mandela, who serves in her husband's cabinet as deputy minister of arts, culture, science and technology.
NEWS
April 3, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Her fist raised in a defiant black-power salute, activist Winnie Mandela returned in triumph yesterday to her home in the black township of Soweto after white authorities apparently gave up their effort to keep her from living there. Mandela was greeted by friends and family, including three grandchildren, and 100 children from a local school who sang freedom songs and chanted "Viva, Mandela. " Since 1962, Mandela has been subject to a variety of government restrictions on her residence, associations and public statements - the process is called banning - and yesterday her lawyer said the government had decided to "abandon" its banning order.
NEWS
April 16, 1992 | By Rick Lyman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Winnie Mandela resigned her position yesterday as head of social welfare for the African National Congress. The move comes just two days after the announced breakup of her 34-year marriage to ANC President Nelson Mandela. "Nothing can make me waiver in my commitment to my organization, to my husband and to the oppressed and impoverished people of South Africa," Mandela told journalists at the ANC's downtown skyscraper. But, she said, "persistent and sensational" charges in recent weeks linking her to the 1989 death of a 14-year-old Soweto youth and the subsequent killing of a township doctor have created "a difficult situation for the ANC. " Winnie Mandela, 57, was convicted of kidnap and accessory to assault and sentenced to six years in prison last year in a case involving the dead youth, "Stompie" Moketsi Seipei.
NEWS
January 26, 1987 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Staff Writer
Winnie Mandela, wife of jailed African National Congress leader Nelson Mandela, was held by South African police for nearly six hours yesterday, and documents were seized from her home, according to her attorney. The attorney, Ismail Ayoub, said Mandela, 52, was returned to her home by police after being taken to a police station and questioned. Her daughter, Zinzi, 25, also was taken in and later released, Ayoub said. Thirteen neighborhood youths playing cards outside the Mandela home in the black township of Soweto also were detained by police.
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NEWS
January 10, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
A WEEK BEFORE "12 Years a Slave" battles for Oscar glory, it will be up for outstanding motion picture at the NAACP Image Awards. As this has been a strong year for black-oriented films, a win there isn't a gimme - "Slave" will go up against " Lee Daniels ' The Butler," "Fruitvale Station," " Mandela : Long Walk to Freedom" and "The Best Man Holiday. " Nominees for best movie actor include Chadwick Boseman for "42," Chiwetel Ejiofor for "12 Years a Slave," Forest Whitaker for "Lee Daniels' The Butler," Idris Elba for "Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom" and Michael B. Jordan for "Fruitvale Station.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2010 | By MICHAEL PHILLIPS, Chicago Tribune
CANNES, France - Jennifer Hudson has visited the film festival here twice, the first time in 2006 with a 20-minute highlights reel from the film version of "Dreamgirls. " That was before "Dreamgirls" won her a supporting-actress Oscar. Posh, influential festivals and the component parts of hype machinery were relatively new to Hudson then. In fact, when the producers told her she'd be going to Cannes, she says, "I was, like, 'You mean Canada?' " She came back to Cannes this week. This time, Hudson had a bodyguard, an enormous Gallic Lurch-like fellow with a surprisingly mellow disposition.
NEWS
April 3, 2000 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
Winnie Mandela, in Philadelphia yesterday as part of a U.S. tour, called for women to have a greater leadership role in the world. Referring to the American and former Soviet governments as "diabolical" and "tyrants," she said that if women had been allowed to lead more during the 20th century, "we would have bequeathed a worthier heritage to the new millennium. " Mandela - whose ex-husband, Nelson Mandela, was a hero of the South African anti-apartheid movement - spoke in West Philadelphia yesterday afternoon before an organization of black women.
NEWS
April 3, 2000 | By Maria Panaritis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Her freedom-fighting reputation tarnished in recent years by allegations of murder, torture and kidnapping, South African antiapartheid activist Winnie Mandela received a hero's welcome in Philadelphia yesterday during a meeting with black female activists, her first stop on a weeklong tour of Philadelphia and New Jersey. Mandela, a member of the South African Parliament, delivered the keynote address for "Black Splendor Weekend," held by the Philadelphia Congress of the National Political Congress of Black Women.
NEWS
December 8, 1997
The testimony heard by South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission about the alleged crimes of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela is as painful as it is revealing. Back when her ex-husband, Nelson Mandela, was a political prisoner, and she carried out a lonely struggle against apartheid, Winnie Mandela was a heroine to much of the world. But in the late 1980s, a protection squad that operated out of her home became involved in a general reign of terror, torture and murder. She was tried in 1991 and convicted of instigating the kidnapping and assault of three people, including 14-year-old Stompie Seipei, who was later murdered.
NEWS
December 7, 1997 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Not many people have the capacity to shrug off eight days of testimony from nearly 40 witnesses linking them to an assortment of murders, assaults and tortures. But there are not many people in the world like Winnie Madikizela-Mandela. Nelson Mandela's ex-wife emerged from an extraordinary session of South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission last week unrepentant, unbowed and, for the most part, undamaged by a fusillade of testimony indicating that she directed a terroristic gang of youths during the antiapartheid struggle.
NEWS
November 30, 1997 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nine years ago, as the news emerged that Winnie Mandela's bodyguards had beaten and killed a 14-year-old boy in her Soweto home, Azhar Cachalia girded himself for one of the most troubling decisions of his life. For several months, he had watched as the actions of Mandela's personal gang of vigilantes had become increasingly frightful. The Mandela United Football Club was conducting a reign of terror in the black township in the late 1980s. Club members were suspected of killing rivals, assassinating informers and intimidating opponents with rapes and beatings.
NEWS
November 27, 1997 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Paul Verryn sat behind his desk yesterday at the Central Methodist Mission in Johannesburg, exhausted from the sermon he had delivered - not from the pulpit, but from the witness stand. "It was good for me to be able to face Mrs. Mandela directly and it was good for me to have a chance to say to her what I said to her," said Verryn. Hours earlier, Verryn, 45, had wept as he told South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission that he had failed to protect a 14-year-old boy who was abducted from Verryn's house nine years ago and then beaten to death by loyalists of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela.
NEWS
November 26, 1997 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A former member of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela's bodyguard unit yesterday accused her of stabbing a 14-year-old suspected police informant to death nine years ago. Katiza Cebekhulu, 30, who fled South Africa six years ago to avoid testifying in Madikizela-Mandela's trial for kidnapping and assault, said that he saw the popular antiapartheid activist kill the teenager. Madikizela-Mandela denied it. Cebekhulu's testimony was one of the most damaging accusations leveled against Madikizela-Mandela in the weeklong hearing before South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission about the actions of her and her former bodyguard detail, called the Mandela United Football Club.
NEWS
October 27, 1997 | By Maida Odom, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Feeling an ebullient rush an hour after addressing hundreds of thousands of women Saturday, Winnie Madikizela-Mandela stood in the middle of her hotel room with her arms outstretched. "It was a historical occasion. I have never seen anything like it," she said to a small cadre of associates and helpers. "So many women. African. African American women. Sisters. " Comparing the strengths, needs and histories of African and African American women, she began considering what broader cooperation between them could mean.
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