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Winslow Homer

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SPORTS
February 3, 2010 | THE INQUIRER
Holy Bull Stakes winner Winslow Homer has suffered a stress fracture in his cannon bone that will cause him to miss the Triple Crown races this year, according to multiple reports. Winslow Homer, who is owned by Wilmington resident Rick Porter's Fox Hill Farms, was considered among the leading Kentucky Derby prospects after winning the Jan. 23 race at Gulfstream Park. The trainer said the 3-year-old colt will leave for Rood and Riddle Clinic in Lexington, Ky., on Friday where he'll have surgery performed by Larry Bramlage.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1991 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Before he became recognized as a premier realist painter, Winslow Homer worked many years as a magazine illustrator, in the days before the invention of the halftone process brought photographs to the popular press. Some of Homer's best-known paintings, such as Snap-the-Whip and Dad's Coming, originated as illustrations in Harper's Weekly, one of the most popular periodicals in mid-19th-century America. Homer's years as a painter, which began about 1875, have been abundantly documented through books and exhibitions, but his early career as a commercial artist has received far less attention.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1986 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Does blue really dominate Winslow Homer's watercolors, or does it only seem that way? Not all of them include an audacious passage of water or sky - perhaps even the majority don't - but I have always envisioned them as flashes of brilliant ultramarine and regal Prussian blue. I don't know of another watercolorist who flaunts his blues as Homer does, nor can I think of anyone else who consistently creates such clarified envelopes of color and light in this capricious and fugitive medium.
NEWS
October 19, 2012 | BY MORGAN MEIS, For the Daily News
IT IS a sexy and exciting painting. A beautiful woman in boots and underclothes is draped in the arms of a mysterious man whose face is obscured by the red blaze of a scarf blowing in the wind. His strength, though, is apparent in his big hands and powerful arms. The woman is in full swoon, her right arm dangling down to her side, a flash of naked thigh peeking out on both legs. The great American artist Winslow Homer painted "The Life Line" in 1884, and it's the centerpiece of a show at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, "Shipwreck!
TRAVEL
September 30, 2012 | By Clarke Canfield, Associated Press
SCARBOROUGH, Maine - The studio where painter Winslow Homer derived inspiration on Maine's craggy coast and produced some of his most notable seascapes isn't heated with wood or illuminated by oil lamps as it was in Homer's day. But in most other ways, the studio has now been restored to what it was like when Homer lived there, from 1883 until his death in 1910, following a multiyear, $2.8 million restoration by the Portland Museum of Art. ...
SPORTS
January 25, 2010 | By DICK JERARDI, jerardd@phillynews.com
It was last summer when Tony Dutrow first began to think Kentucky Derby with Winslow Homer, a colt he thought he had serious promise. The thought got much more serious Saturday when Winslow Homer, a colt that won an allowance race at Philadelphia Park on Nov. 20, made his stakes debut and won the Holy Bull Stakes at Gulfstream Park. "I wanted to walk away from the race, regardless of his placing, and feel good," Dutrow said. Winning was not necessary. This is about the first Saturday in May. Winslow Homer won like the good horse Dutrow always thought he was, beating favored Jackson Bend by three-quarters of a length.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Winslow Homer made "art about life. " Now, it becomes clear that a large and closely focused part of his work authentically evokes a particular era. And that era was the American Civil War. As a young artist serving as a war correspondent for Harper's Weekly, Homer and other artists with a similar mission were in touch with the outer reaches of its battlefront - remote places where daily life differed in so many remarkable ways from his own...
NEWS
September 24, 2012
'COOKING' AT THE PLAYHOUSE Some folks consider cooking a drag. But in the case of Jay Falzone and Stephen Smith, that's a good thing. The pair are the two gender-bending stars (as well as two of the three co-creators) of "Cooking with the Calamari Sisters," which on Thursdays begins an open-ended run at the Society Hill Playhouse. Presented as an episode of a Brooklyn-based low-budget public-access cable TV show, the program offers Italian humor and music with actual culinary activity (the two stars whip up a meal as they sing, dance and crack wise)
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Ironically, Winslow Homer became a great American artist in large part because he spent nearly two years living in an English fishing village at the edge of the North Sea. Before he settled in Cullercoats in the spring of 1881, Homer had built up an impressive portfolio of prints and paintings that marked him as a perceptive observer of American life, particularly as lived outdoors. These images often depicted ordinary people such as farm boys, or fashionably dressed young women at leisure.
NEWS
March 31, 1991 | By Edward Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
In 1883, when he was well into his maturity as an artist, Winslow Homer closed his New York studio and established his home on a small peninsula south of Portland, Maine, called Prout's Neck. During the time he lived there, until he died in 1910, he produced a series of seascapes that define that genre magnificently, within American and European art. No other artist has painted the sea as Homer did because no one else has understood it as totally. His incomparable vision was the inevitable consequence of living and working for 27 years in a studio that was literally a stone's throw from the breakers crashing against the cliffs of Prout's Neck.
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NEWS
October 19, 2012 | BY MORGAN MEIS, For the Daily News
IT IS a sexy and exciting painting. A beautiful woman in boots and underclothes is draped in the arms of a mysterious man whose face is obscured by the red blaze of a scarf blowing in the wind. His strength, though, is apparent in his big hands and powerful arms. The woman is in full swoon, her right arm dangling down to her side, a flash of naked thigh peeking out on both legs. The great American artist Winslow Homer painted "The Life Line" in 1884, and it's the centerpiece of a show at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, "Shipwreck!
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Ironically, Winslow Homer became a great American artist in large part because he spent nearly two years living in an English fishing village at the edge of the North Sea. Before he settled in Cullercoats in the spring of 1881, Homer had built up an impressive portfolio of prints and paintings that marked him as a perceptive observer of American life, particularly as lived outdoors. These images often depicted ordinary people such as farm boys, or fashionably dressed young women at leisure.
TRAVEL
September 30, 2012 | By Clarke Canfield, Associated Press
SCARBOROUGH, Maine - The studio where painter Winslow Homer derived inspiration on Maine's craggy coast and produced some of his most notable seascapes isn't heated with wood or illuminated by oil lamps as it was in Homer's day. But in most other ways, the studio has now been restored to what it was like when Homer lived there, from 1883 until his death in 1910, following a multiyear, $2.8 million restoration by the Portland Museum of Art. ...
NEWS
September 24, 2012
'COOKING' AT THE PLAYHOUSE Some folks consider cooking a drag. But in the case of Jay Falzone and Stephen Smith, that's a good thing. The pair are the two gender-bending stars (as well as two of the three co-creators) of "Cooking with the Calamari Sisters," which on Thursdays begins an open-ended run at the Society Hill Playhouse. Presented as an episode of a Brooklyn-based low-budget public-access cable TV show, the program offers Italian humor and music with actual culinary activity (the two stars whip up a meal as they sing, dance and crack wise)
SPORTS
February 3, 2010 | THE INQUIRER
Holy Bull Stakes winner Winslow Homer has suffered a stress fracture in his cannon bone that will cause him to miss the Triple Crown races this year, according to multiple reports. Winslow Homer, who is owned by Wilmington resident Rick Porter's Fox Hill Farms, was considered among the leading Kentucky Derby prospects after winning the Jan. 23 race at Gulfstream Park. The trainer said the 3-year-old colt will leave for Rood and Riddle Clinic in Lexington, Ky., on Friday where he'll have surgery performed by Larry Bramlage.
SPORTS
January 25, 2010 | By DICK JERARDI, jerardd@phillynews.com
It was last summer when Tony Dutrow first began to think Kentucky Derby with Winslow Homer, a colt he thought he had serious promise. The thought got much more serious Saturday when Winslow Homer, a colt that won an allowance race at Philadelphia Park on Nov. 20, made his stakes debut and won the Holy Bull Stakes at Gulfstream Park. "I wanted to walk away from the race, regardless of his placing, and feel good," Dutrow said. Winning was not necessary. This is about the first Saturday in May. Winslow Homer won like the good horse Dutrow always thought he was, beating favored Jackson Bend by three-quarters of a length.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Winslow Homer made "art about life. " Now, it becomes clear that a large and closely focused part of his work authentically evokes a particular era. And that era was the American Civil War. As a young artist serving as a war correspondent for Harper's Weekly, Homer and other artists with a similar mission were in touch with the outer reaches of its battlefront - remote places where daily life differed in so many remarkable ways from his own...
NEWS
June 5, 1994 | By Galina Espinoza, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Lined up along the blackboard were reproductions of works by some of the greatest artists of all time. There was a Renior, a Chagall, a couple of Picassos. The works had been set up last week for a group of first graders at Clara Barton Elementary School. A goal of the "exhibit" was to teach the students about the use of different colors, materials and forms in creating a piece of art. Most of all, the exhibit was intended to expose children to cultural masterpieces in an attempt to cultivate a lifelong appreciation of art. That is precisely what the local chapter of the Art Goes to School Program, which staged last week's exhibit at the Barton school, has been trying to do for 20 years.
NEWS
July 30, 1992 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
If you've never heard of a marine painter named William Partridge Burpee, you shouldn't be surprised. Burpee's reluctance to sell his work and a series of unusual circumstances kept his name buried in American art history for years after his death in 1940. The exhibition of 44 of his seascapes in oil and pastel at the Philadelphia Maritime Museum is only the second ever devoted to him. The first was mounted in 1976 in his home town of Rockland, Maine, by the William A. Farnsworth Library and Art Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1991 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Before he became recognized as a premier realist painter, Winslow Homer worked many years as a magazine illustrator, in the days before the invention of the halftone process brought photographs to the popular press. Some of Homer's best-known paintings, such as Snap-the-Whip and Dad's Coming, originated as illustrations in Harper's Weekly, one of the most popular periodicals in mid-19th-century America. Homer's years as a painter, which began about 1875, have been abundantly documented through books and exhibitions, but his early career as a commercial artist has received far less attention.
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