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ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014
UNDOUBTEDLY, this has been my winter of discontent. As much as I hate to admit it, and in spite of my valiant efforts, I was TKO'd by winter weight gain. For years, I categorized winter weight-gain theories as old wives' tales or urban myths. Until this year, when I was overtaken by this monster who had an insatiable appetite - for chocolate, in particular, but also an unrelenting desire for Herr's potato chips and my favorite vegan peanut butter bars. If I was unsure before, I'm very clear about this now!
NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA - The mountainous, blackening snow piles, record power outages, winter-strafed roadbeds, and legions of defeated trees. All argue for the singular ferocity of the winter of 2013-14. Dr. Theodore A. Christopher has witnessed something else, and if the weather community isn't ready to rank this season on the severity scale, he is. "This is the worst," said Christopher, the director of emergency medicine at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, where he has worked for 30 years.
SPORTS
December 18, 1990 | By Mayer Brandschain, Special to The Inquirer
Bob Sheppard of Five Ponds Country Club and Brian Kelly of Plymouth Country Club birdied the last two holes to finish in a first-place tie at 9-under-par 62 with Gene Kazan of Medford Village Country Club and Dave Quinn of Burlington Country Club in a two-player scramble in the Five Ponds Winter Golf League yesterday at Five Ponds.
NEWS
August 24, 2014 | By Leah Kochenour, Inquirer Staff Writer
Summer is coming to a close, but some of the region's road crews might be wondering if last winter is ever going to end. "We're still in the midst of treating roads that suffered extensive damage during the winter," said Eugene Blaum, spokesman for the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. From Dec. 1 through Aug. 14, he said, PennDot used 15,922 tons of patching material on the region's roads - about double what it used during the comparable periods in the previous two years combined.
NEWS
January 4, 2016 | By Jacqueline Urgo, Staff Writer
STONE HARBOR, N.J. - After the holidays were over and the population of this tiny Cape May County beach town last winter plummeted to mere hundreds - as it traditionally does here during the coldest months of the year - more than 10 percent of the year-round residents showed up weekly for a new fitness campaign offered by the town. The fact that so many of the 850 permanent dwellers braved the ice and snow for the 10-week free program to learn about a healthier lifestyle gave Mayor Suzanne Walters insight into just how eager those residents were to connect with others over what is the most desolate time of the year.
NEWS
February 29, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood and Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
For John Davis, it was a dream winter - over by Halloween. That would have been just after a freak Oct. 29 storm of heavy, wet snow collapsed tree limbs, ripped down power lines and set Davis and his public-works colleagues throughout the region to worrying: Here we go again. But after back-to-back brutal winters, neither Davis - nor his peers nor the best minds of meteorology - imagined that storm would be the very worst of the "winter" of 2011-12. "Ordinarily you spend the winter plowing or getting ready for plowing," said Davis, public-works chief in Doylestown, Bucks County, where the tight streets and well-used sidewalks make snow removal an adventure.
NEWS
March 18, 2001 | By James Dulley FOR THE INQUIRER
Question: The ducts for our central air-conditioning run through the attic and the registers are in the ceiling. It seems that cold air comes out of them in the winter. Is the chilly breeze my imagination? Answer: It most likely is not your imagination. The air inside the air-conditioning ducts in your attic gets cold and becomes dense. Since it is heavier than the air inside your room, it drops down and you feel it. This can create a substantial energy loss and make you uncomfortable.
NEWS
January 13, 2014 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
After two winters that were virtually holidays from ice, winter has returned with an expensive vengeance for the region's road departments. With the typical peak snow period still a few weeks away, the region already has had nearly a season's worth of snowfall - spiced with generous portions of ice - and the plowing and salting bills are piling up faster than the pothole complaints. The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation has spent more than two-thirds of its total seasonal snow-fighting budget, and the New Jersey Department has shelled out more than twice what it did during the entire winter of 2011-12.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jane Valdes-Dapena's garden in Media got walloped this winter, the region's coldest, snowiest, and most miserable in 20 years. Her hydrangea canes are crispy and hollow, with just a few new leaves sprouting from the base. The shrub roses, typically robust in spring, are practically bare. And that big pot of rosemary, 10 years on the terrace? "Dead as a doornail," says Valdes-Dapena, development associate at the Community Arts Center in Wallingford and an experienced gardener.
NEWS
November 18, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
PISCATAWAY, N.J. - What kind of winter will it be? Severe as last year's, or milder like two previous ones? Can an early snow in Siberia affect weather in Philadelphia, and what impact will El Niño have? Rutgers University's Global Snow Lab in Piscataway tries to answer those questions using raw federal data on the snow cover in North America and Eurasia to create maps and long-term climate records to aid forecasting. Bottom line, the winter of 2014-15 will likely be "volatile" across the region, said New Jersey state climatologist David Robinson, director of the snow lab. "I've been standoffish until now" to make a prediction.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
February 5, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
The reformed marijuana grower and the ex-Wall Street banker make an unlikely duo, working side by side in an old South Philadelphia factory building where - despite the chill outside - the air is warm, humid, and sweetened by hundreds of basil plants. Lee Weingrad, the grower, and Jack Griffin, the businessman, have great hopes for this "vertical" farm, where hydroponic herbs, microgreens, and tomatoes crowd together in troughs stacked almost to the ceiling. This is Metropolis Farms.
REAL_ESTATE
February 1, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Carbon monoxide poisoning is more of a danger in winter months than it is in summer because cold weather tends to make us stay in a very tight indoor environment. The odorless, colorless - yet potentially deadly - gas results from the burning of wood, natural gas, oil, and kerosene. To keep carbon monoxide from building up in your home, don't use generators, charcoal grills, camp stoves, or other gasoline- or charcoal-burning devices inside the house, the basement or the garage, or near windows.
NEWS
January 30, 2016
By Ellen Scolnic and Joyce Eisenberg Twenty-three inches of snow ago, we were feeling pretty smug. We were proud that we didn't waste money on a January vacation to the Riviera Maya like some of our friends did. We were glad we didn't prepay for discount lift tickets at Jack Frost, whose ski trails were bare. We wondered whether anyone was buying the marked-down mittens and scarves at the post-Christmas sale when it was 70 degrees outside. We felt bad for the kids who wouldn't have a snow day and the TV weather anchors who had to fake enthusiasm for a seven-day forecast of nothing but mid-40s temperatures and gray skies.
FOOD
January 29, 2016 | By Jill P. Capuzzo, For The Inquirer
For many of us living in the cold climes of the Northeast, the start of the year presents something of a consumption conundrum. We vow to knock off those extra pounds racked up from our holiday indulgences and promise we'll stick to our New Year's resolutions to eat more healthily. Meanwhile, the low temperatures and shorter days find us desperately craving hearty dishes filled with carbohydrates and fats. Scientific studies support our comfort food urges: everything from how the body takes more time to break down foods dense in calories, thereby releasing a steady flow of energy to stave off the cold, to the psychological response to seasonal affective disorder that has us reaching for mac and cheese or chicken pot pie to overcome the gloom from lack of daylight.
NEWS
January 26, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
First, it's too warm to buy a new winter coat. Then, just when you need one, a powerful storm forces the stores to close. While many began the exhaustive task of digging themselves and their vehicles out, others stayed indoors, hoping the sun would do much of the work. As a result, the region's malls, restaurants, and bars reopened for business, but their customers didn't return in droves. Wendy Silverwood, 55, of East Goshen, Chester County, was among those who stayed home Sunday.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
For coat retailers, it's worse than a winter of discontent. It's one of deep discounts. The unseasonably warm weather and zero snow have left piles of unsold winter merchandise on stores' floors. While no one has tracked the overall losses, retail analysts say it's easily in the hundreds of millions of dollars for the year's last quarter, causing havoc at stores from Macy's to Burlington Coat Factory. All that red ink is a boon for consumers, though. This month, several retailers resorted to deep discounting of coats, which typically doesn't occur until February or March.
NEWS
January 13, 2016
A doctoral student at the University of Pennsylvania died late last month during the winter break, a school official confirmed Monday night. Stephen Kyle Wilshusen's death Dec. 31 was ruled a suicide by the Philadelphia Medical Examiner's Office, the Daily Pennsylvanian newspaper reported. No further information on his death was available. Wilshusen, a native of Boulder, Colo., was a first-year Ph.D. student in computer science, said Vijay Kumar, the Nemirovsky Family Dean of Penn Engineering.
REAL_ESTATE
January 10, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
I chuckled as I wrote this in December because it had been warmer than usual and the next several days promised to be in the upper 50s and mid-60s, if one believes the weather forecasters (I don't). What I offer are suggestions from the people who make the Snow Joe Hybrid iON, a snow blower that operates on either a lithium battery or an AC power cord. As veteran readers know, I bought a gas-driven snow thrower/blower in the fall of 1997 after having weathered the winter of 1996 and its record snowfalls.
NEWS
January 9, 2016
PENNSAUKEN Camden County's WinterFest Ice Rink will present free professional ice skating shows four times a week beginning Friday and continuing through Valentine's Day. "Rock the Ice" skating shows will be presented at 7 p.m. Fridays, 3 and 7 p.m. Saturdays, and 2 p.m. Sundays. "Come see the performers as they bring modern music to life on ice," said Freeholder Jeffrey L. Nash, liaison to the Camden County Parks Department. "The show features upbeat dance moves, specialty skating acts, triple jumps, backflips, and great music.
FOOD
January 7, 2016
Makes 4 servings / enough for 2 batches of socca. 3 tablespoons olive oil 2 cloves garlic, diced 1 onion, diced ½ large bell pepper, diced ½ large eggplant, cut into small chunks 1 small potato, cubed 1 small sweet potato 1 teaspoon dried basil 1 tablespoon Italian seasoning 1/2 teaspoon salt 14 ounce can diced tomatoes 3/4 cup water 1 tablespoon flour 1 cup cooked chickpeas Salt and...
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