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NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA - The mountainous, blackening snow piles, record power outages, winter-strafed roadbeds, and legions of defeated trees. All argue for the singular ferocity of the winter of 2013-14. Dr. Theodore A. Christopher has witnessed something else, and if the weather community isn't ready to rank this season on the severity scale, he is. "This is the worst," said Christopher, the director of emergency medicine at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, where he has worked for 30 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014
UNDOUBTEDLY, this has been my winter of discontent. As much as I hate to admit it, and in spite of my valiant efforts, I was TKO'd by winter weight gain. For years, I categorized winter weight-gain theories as old wives' tales or urban myths. Until this year, when I was overtaken by this monster who had an insatiable appetite - for chocolate, in particular, but also an unrelenting desire for Herr's potato chips and my favorite vegan peanut butter bars. If I was unsure before, I'm very clear about this now!
SPORTS
December 18, 1990 | By Mayer Brandschain, Special to The Inquirer
Bob Sheppard of Five Ponds Country Club and Brian Kelly of Plymouth Country Club birdied the last two holes to finish in a first-place tie at 9-under-par 62 with Gene Kazan of Medford Village Country Club and Dave Quinn of Burlington Country Club in a two-player scramble in the Five Ponds Winter Golf League yesterday at Five Ponds.
NEWS
August 24, 2014 | By Leah Kochenour, Inquirer Staff Writer
Summer is coming to a close, but some of the region's road crews might be wondering if last winter is ever going to end. "We're still in the midst of treating roads that suffered extensive damage during the winter," said Eugene Blaum, spokesman for the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. From Dec. 1 through Aug. 14, he said, PennDot used 15,922 tons of patching material on the region's roads - about double what it used during the comparable periods in the previous two years combined.
NEWS
February 29, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood and Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
For John Davis, it was a dream winter - over by Halloween. That would have been just after a freak Oct. 29 storm of heavy, wet snow collapsed tree limbs, ripped down power lines and set Davis and his public-works colleagues throughout the region to worrying: Here we go again. But after back-to-back brutal winters, neither Davis - nor his peers nor the best minds of meteorology - imagined that storm would be the very worst of the "winter" of 2011-12. "Ordinarily you spend the winter plowing or getting ready for plowing," said Davis, public-works chief in Doylestown, Bucks County, where the tight streets and well-used sidewalks make snow removal an adventure.
NEWS
March 18, 2001 | By James Dulley FOR THE INQUIRER
Question: The ducts for our central air-conditioning run through the attic and the registers are in the ceiling. It seems that cold air comes out of them in the winter. Is the chilly breeze my imagination? Answer: It most likely is not your imagination. The air inside the air-conditioning ducts in your attic gets cold and becomes dense. Since it is heavier than the air inside your room, it drops down and you feel it. This can create a substantial energy loss and make you uncomfortable.
NEWS
January 13, 2014 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
After two winters that were virtually holidays from ice, winter has returned with an expensive vengeance for the region's road departments. With the typical peak snow period still a few weeks away, the region already has had nearly a season's worth of snowfall - spiced with generous portions of ice - and the plowing and salting bills are piling up faster than the pothole complaints. The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation has spent more than two-thirds of its total seasonal snow-fighting budget, and the New Jersey Department has shelled out more than twice what it did during the entire winter of 2011-12.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jane Valdes-Dapena's garden in Media got walloped this winter, the region's coldest, snowiest, and most miserable in 20 years. Her hydrangea canes are crispy and hollow, with just a few new leaves sprouting from the base. The shrub roses, typically robust in spring, are practically bare. And that big pot of rosemary, 10 years on the terrace? "Dead as a doornail," says Valdes-Dapena, development associate at the Community Arts Center in Wallingford and an experienced gardener.
NEWS
November 18, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
PISCATAWAY, N.J. - What kind of winter will it be? Severe as last year's, or milder like two previous ones? Can an early snow in Siberia affect weather in Philadelphia, and what impact will El Niño have? Rutgers University's Global Snow Lab in Piscataway tries to answer those questions using raw federal data on the snow cover in North America and Eurasia to create maps and long-term climate records to aid forecasting. Bottom line, the winter of 2014-15 will likely be "volatile" across the region, said New Jersey state climatologist David Robinson, director of the snow lab. "I've been standoffish until now" to make a prediction.
NEWS
January 4, 2016 | By Jacqueline Urgo, Staff Writer
STONE HARBOR, N.J. - After the holidays were over and the population of this tiny Cape May County beach town last winter plummeted to mere hundreds - as it traditionally does here during the coldest months of the year - more than 10 percent of the year-round residents showed up weekly for a new fitness campaign offered by the town. The fact that so many of the 850 permanent dwellers braved the ice and snow for the 10-week free program to learn about a healthier lifestyle gave Mayor Suzanne Walters insight into just how eager those residents were to connect with others over what is the most desolate time of the year.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
March 29, 2016 | By Phil Anastasia, Staff Writer
Nick Evangelista couldn't pitch last season. He still believes he became a better pitcher. He sat out his junior year at Washington Township with an injury to his right shoulder. He sat and watched as the Minutemen labored through a difficult season, losing a series of close games en route to a 12-14 record. "That was really bad," Evangelista said. "Just sitting there and watching it happen, and knowing I couldn't help in any way, it was really tough. " Evangelista is back for his senior season.
TRAVEL
March 7, 2016 | By George Hobica, AIRFAREWATCHDOG.COM
The film begins with establishing shots of mountain scenery and downhill skiing. It's 1934, and we are in St. Moritz, Switzerland, an alpine resort town the English upper classes have only recently been persuaded is as attractive in winter as it is in summer. The Lawrence family has come for the fresh mountain air and alpine sports. Mommy is a crack sharpshooter (for sport only, at least at first). Not sure what Daddy does; perhaps he's living off family money back in London. And Betty, their rambunctious daughter, has a knack for getting into hot water.
FOOD
February 26, 2016 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Hairy, bumpy, and misshapen, root vegetables are hardly glamorous produce. But these kitchen workhorses are ideal for hearty meals, especially in the pre-green months. "When root vegetables are cooked well, they're naturally sweet and they can really hold their own as the center of the plate," says Jon Cichon, chef of Lacroix. The trick is to make them feel exciting. Often relegated to prepackaged soup kits or the forlorn corners of the supermarket shelf, the less familiar roots and tubers are nevertheless worth exploring.
SPORTS
February 23, 2016 | By Matt Gelb, Staff Writer
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Between winter throwing sessions at his alma mater, Aaron Nola held a baseball in his right hand. He tinkered with different grips for his changeup as he paced the training facilities at Louisiana State University. The Phillies told Nola, their presumptive 22-year-old No. 1 pitcher, that if he were to do anything this winter, it was improve his change. "I played with several grips," Nola said. "One kind of fit me the best. One that I felt comfortable throwing. " This spring offers something of a luxury for Nola, a veteran of all of 13 major league starts.
SPORTS
February 23, 2016 | By Matt Gelb, STAFF WRITER
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Between winter throwing sessions at his alma mater, Aaron Nola held a baseball in his right hand. He tinkered with different grips for his change-up as he paced the training facilities at Louisiana State University. The Phillies told Nola, their presumptive No. 1 pitcher at age 22, that if he were to do anything this winter, it was improve his change. "I played with several grips," Nola said. "One kind of fit me the best, one that I felt comfortable throwing. " This spring offers something of a luxury for Nola, a veteran of all of 13 major-league starts.
NEWS
February 21, 2016
Q: How can I protect myself from carbon monoxide poisoning? A: As the weather gets colder, cases of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning increase because people tend to use fireplaces, portable heaters, and generators during power outages or attempt to warm up their cars without adequate ventilation. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 400 Americans die from unintentional CO poisoning not linked to fires, more than 20,000 visit the emergency room, and more than 4,000 are hospitalized.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2016 | By Ellen Dunkel, Staff Writer
This weekend might be your only chance to see otherwise glorious concert dance performed by dancers wearing very large bunny ears. Such was the case when Trey McIntyre's Big Ones received its world premiere Wednesday night, as BalletX opened its winter series at the Wilma Theater. McIntyre was the mentor for BalletX's new choreographic fellowship. He and Yin Yue, an emerging choreographer from China chosen among 50 applicants, worked together for two months, each producing a new ballet.
NEWS
February 10, 2016 | By Emily Babay, Staff Writer
Several inches of snow are possible in the Philadelphia region.  A dusting fell overnight with more expected later today  and a coastal flood warning is in effect for the New Jersey and Delaware coasts. The National Weather Service posted a winter storm warning through Tuesday night for the immediate Philadelphia area, calling for about 2 to 4 inches of snow, with possibly a bit more to the west. American Airlines announced it would waive ticket change fees and fare differences for customers who want to put off traveling because of the storm.
REAL_ESTATE
February 8, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
The last two winters were not kind to the residential real estate market. Combined with the normal holiday slowdown and run-up to Super Bowl Sunday, days of subfreezing temperatures, snow, ice, and storm-generated power outages took a huge bite out of the bottom lines of area Realtors and home builders. Up until late January, however, this winter was far better-suited to both constructing houses and selling them, agents and builders are saying. "Bad weather adversely affects sales, and we have had a very good November, December, and, up until the 23rd, January," said Main Line Realtor John Duffy.
NEWS
February 8, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
When the hottest year on record - 2015 - was capped off with the area's warmest December on record, no one was feeling the heat more than Lloyd Traven. Traven owns Peace Tree Farm, a Kintnersville, Bucks County, nursery that's one of a handful of local operations tasked with manipulating thousands of bulbs, perennials, and trees to burst into a synchronized show of blossoms and foliage out of season, but just in time for the March 5 opening of the PHS Philadelphia Flower Show. That work, known as "forcing" plants, is accomplished with carefully administered doses of fertilizer, light, and heat.
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