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NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA - The mountainous, blackening snow piles, record power outages, winter-strafed roadbeds, and legions of defeated trees. All argue for the singular ferocity of the winter of 2013-14. Dr. Theodore A. Christopher has witnessed something else, and if the weather community isn't ready to rank this season on the severity scale, he is. "This is the worst," said Christopher, the director of emergency medicine at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, where he has worked for 30 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014
UNDOUBTEDLY, this has been my winter of discontent. As much as I hate to admit it, and in spite of my valiant efforts, I was TKO'd by winter weight gain. For years, I categorized winter weight-gain theories as old wives' tales or urban myths. Until this year, when I was overtaken by this monster who had an insatiable appetite - for chocolate, in particular, but also an unrelenting desire for Herr's potato chips and my favorite vegan peanut butter bars. If I was unsure before, I'm very clear about this now!
SPORTS
December 18, 1990 | By Mayer Brandschain, Special to The Inquirer
Bob Sheppard of Five Ponds Country Club and Brian Kelly of Plymouth Country Club birdied the last two holes to finish in a first-place tie at 9-under-par 62 with Gene Kazan of Medford Village Country Club and Dave Quinn of Burlington Country Club in a two-player scramble in the Five Ponds Winter Golf League yesterday at Five Ponds.
NEWS
January 13, 2014 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
After two winters that were virtually holidays from ice, winter has returned with an expensive vengeance for the region's road departments. With the typical peak snow period still a few weeks away, the region already has had nearly a season's worth of snowfall - spiced with generous portions of ice - and the plowing and salting bills are piling up faster than the pothole complaints. The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation has spent more than two-thirds of its total seasonal snow-fighting budget, and the New Jersey Department has shelled out more than twice what it did during the entire winter of 2011-12.
NEWS
August 24, 2014 | By Leah Kochenour, Inquirer Staff Writer
Summer is coming to a close, but some of the region's road crews might be wondering if last winter is ever going to end. "We're still in the midst of treating roads that suffered extensive damage during the winter," said Eugene Blaum, spokesman for the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. From Dec. 1 through Aug. 14, he said, PennDot used 15,922 tons of patching material on the region's roads - about double what it used during the comparable periods in the previous two years combined.
NEWS
February 29, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood and Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
For John Davis, it was a dream winter - over by Halloween. That would have been just after a freak Oct. 29 storm of heavy, wet snow collapsed tree limbs, ripped down power lines and set Davis and his public-works colleagues throughout the region to worrying: Here we go again. But after back-to-back brutal winters, neither Davis - nor his peers nor the best minds of meteorology - imagined that storm would be the very worst of the "winter" of 2011-12. "Ordinarily you spend the winter plowing or getting ready for plowing," said Davis, public-works chief in Doylestown, Bucks County, where the tight streets and well-used sidewalks make snow removal an adventure.
NEWS
March 18, 2001 | By James Dulley FOR THE INQUIRER
Question: The ducts for our central air-conditioning run through the attic and the registers are in the ceiling. It seems that cold air comes out of them in the winter. Is the chilly breeze my imagination? Answer: It most likely is not your imagination. The air inside the air-conditioning ducts in your attic gets cold and becomes dense. Since it is heavier than the air inside your room, it drops down and you feel it. This can create a substantial energy loss and make you uncomfortable.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jane Valdes-Dapena's garden in Media got walloped this winter, the region's coldest, snowiest, and most miserable in 20 years. Her hydrangea canes are crispy and hollow, with just a few new leaves sprouting from the base. The shrub roses, typically robust in spring, are practically bare. And that big pot of rosemary, 10 years on the terrace? "Dead as a doornail," says Valdes-Dapena, development associate at the Community Arts Center in Wallingford and an experienced gardener.
NEWS
November 18, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
PISCATAWAY, N.J. - What kind of winter will it be? Severe as last year's, or milder like two previous ones? Can an early snow in Siberia affect weather in Philadelphia, and what impact will El NiƱo have? Rutgers University's Global Snow Lab in Piscataway tries to answer those questions using raw federal data on the snow cover in North America and Eurasia to create maps and long-term climate records to aid forecasting. Bottom line, the winter of 2014-15 will likely be "volatile" across the region, said New Jersey state climatologist David Robinson, director of the snow lab. "I've been standoffish until now" to make a prediction.
NEWS
October 4, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Expect temperatures 6 degrees colder than last winter's, and a six-fold increase -- or more -- in snowfall. In short, if Accu-Weather's winter outlook turns out to be right, the coming season will be whole lot more like a typical winter than in 2011-12. In the forecast released this morning, an update and elaboration of an earlier outlook, the commercial weather service in State College, Pa., is calling for near-normal temperatures this winter, with above-normal snowfall. In addition, Accu-Weather believes Philadelphia will have an above-average number of days -- perhaps seven -- with snowfall of an inch or more, said long-range forecaster Paul Pastelok.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
At Circle M Farms in Salem, grower Santo Maccherone has trouble containing his enthusiasm these days. His peach trees - covering more than 100 acres - are absolutely laden with fruit. "The peaches are happy, I'm happy, and the people eating them are happy," he said with a laugh. A "consistently cold winter," cool bloom season, and plentiful rain have created the right conditions for a strong crop, said Maccherone, president of the New Jersey Peach Promotion Council, a nonprofit organization of growers, shippers, wholesalers, and associated industries.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of five Pennsylvania electricity suppliers charged with deceptive practices after last year's round of wild winter price spikes has agreed to pay nearly $2 million in refunds and penalties. HIKO Energy L.L.C., a New York state supplier, agreed to the payments in a settlement with Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane and acting Consumer Advocate Tanya J. McCloskey. HIKO also agreed to cease accepting any new Pennsylvania customers through June 30, 2016, and to change its marketing practices to fully disclose the risks of variable-rate electricity plans.
NEWS
May 5, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Allie Ilagan usually would have run about 150 training miles before hitting the pavement in the Broad Street Run. But by Sunday, she had covered less than 50. So after some soul-searching, she decided to skip the race and spend the day cheering on her husband, Mikey. "The harsh winter was the biggest culprit," said Ilagan, 26, a veteran runner who lives in South Philadelphia. Some other runners said they felt the same way Sunday, their legs a little underprepared - but their enthusiasm undiminished, the field of 40,000 creating a pageant of color and motion during the 36th Broad Street Run. One man ran in a Superman cape.
TRAVEL
April 5, 2015 | By Rosemary Robinson Pall, For The Inquirer
When our daughter, a physical-therapy student, was offered a 10-week clinical experience in Fairbanks, Alaska, my husband and I encouraged her to go for it. "We'll come and visit!" we said. Upon hearing that her assignment was from February through April, though, we had second thoughts. Would we freeze? Would there be enough daylight to enjoy the trip? My husband and I decided to go for it, too. On Jan. 28, the three of us flew to Alaska to spend two days in Anchorage, then drove 360 miles north to Fairbanks.
FOOD
March 27, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
As our second cooking class got underway at Roberto Clemente Middle School, I was amazed at how quickly these eighth graders had gotten the hang of things. They filed in, stashed their backpacks, donned their aprons, washed hands, and turned to the recipe. "We're making the winter minestrone today," announced Tatiana Castillo, 13, completely in charge. A new student joined us, our only boy, Raul Camacho, 14, who sports a thick shock of dyed-blue hair and hip black glasses. I wasn't sure what to expect, but he was quiet and serious, and actually a calming addition to our group.
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pay no attention to all that snow on the lawn or the car roof. Officially, meteorologically, and astronomically, winter truly is over. Given that the region has just been creamed with up to six inches of snow, and in deference to the first full day of spring, we'll hold off on mentioning what happened in April 100 years ago. For now, if you give the spring sun a few hours Saturday, you probably won't have to do much shoveling. Gary Szatkowski, meteorologist in charge of the National Weather Service in Mount Holly, has promised it will all be gone by day's end. And although temperatures will stay well below normal for the next few days, no more snow is in the forecast.
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | By Scott Sturgis, For The Inquirer
Now that the spring equinox is past, it's a good time to ponder what we've learned from driving during the winter of 2014-15 - a winter to remember. Let's review the material and clip and save it for the future. Then, we can pull this column back out when the snow makes an unwelcome return . . . next year, thankyouverymuch . People drive too fast in bad weather. In good weather, I am a motivated driver. But when the snow starts falling, I find the recommended 45 m.p.h. on most Pennsylvania limited-access highways still far too high.
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | By John Moritz and Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writers
For Heather Redfern, a trip to the Target store turned out to be far costlier than she planned. On the way home from the store, near the Neshaminy Mall, in Bucks County, she had an unfortunate encounter with that late-winter nemesis - the pothole. "Some of them you hit, and you just cringe and hope nothing bad happened to your car," said Redfern, who works in SEPTA's media-relations department. In this case, hope wasn't enough. Redfern needed a new tire, wheel, and valve stem - for $550.
NEWS
March 8, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Columnist
Friday was the first day that NJSIAA baseball teams could begin practice, and we're guessing that not many teams in South Jersey had outdoor workouts. The snowstorm of Thursday wasn't very field-friendly. The season begins April 1, so every day leading up to it is important, but at least in the beginning, those days will be taking place indoors. And that goes to show what people from South Jersey, and really, the entire Northeast have to go through to play baseball or softball.
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