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NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA - The mountainous, blackening snow piles, record power outages, winter-strafed roadbeds, and legions of defeated trees. All argue for the singular ferocity of the winter of 2013-14. Dr. Theodore A. Christopher has witnessed something else, and if the weather community isn't ready to rank this season on the severity scale, he is. "This is the worst," said Christopher, the director of emergency medicine at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, where he has worked for 30 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014
UNDOUBTEDLY, this has been my winter of discontent. As much as I hate to admit it, and in spite of my valiant efforts, I was TKO'd by winter weight gain. For years, I categorized winter weight-gain theories as old wives' tales or urban myths. Until this year, when I was overtaken by this monster who had an insatiable appetite - for chocolate, in particular, but also an unrelenting desire for Herr's potato chips and my favorite vegan peanut butter bars. If I was unsure before, I'm very clear about this now!
SPORTS
December 18, 1990 | By Mayer Brandschain, Special to The Inquirer
Bob Sheppard of Five Ponds Country Club and Brian Kelly of Plymouth Country Club birdied the last two holes to finish in a first-place tie at 9-under-par 62 with Gene Kazan of Medford Village Country Club and Dave Quinn of Burlington Country Club in a two-player scramble in the Five Ponds Winter Golf League yesterday at Five Ponds.
NEWS
August 24, 2014 | By Leah Kochenour, Inquirer Staff Writer
Summer is coming to a close, but some of the region's road crews might be wondering if last winter is ever going to end. "We're still in the midst of treating roads that suffered extensive damage during the winter," said Eugene Blaum, spokesman for the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. From Dec. 1 through Aug. 14, he said, PennDot used 15,922 tons of patching material on the region's roads - about double what it used during the comparable periods in the previous two years combined.
NEWS
January 13, 2014 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
After two winters that were virtually holidays from ice, winter has returned with an expensive vengeance for the region's road departments. With the typical peak snow period still a few weeks away, the region already has had nearly a season's worth of snowfall - spiced with generous portions of ice - and the plowing and salting bills are piling up faster than the pothole complaints. The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation has spent more than two-thirds of its total seasonal snow-fighting budget, and the New Jersey Department has shelled out more than twice what it did during the entire winter of 2011-12.
NEWS
February 29, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood and Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
For John Davis, it was a dream winter - over by Halloween. That would have been just after a freak Oct. 29 storm of heavy, wet snow collapsed tree limbs, ripped down power lines and set Davis and his public-works colleagues throughout the region to worrying: Here we go again. But after back-to-back brutal winters, neither Davis - nor his peers nor the best minds of meteorology - imagined that storm would be the very worst of the "winter" of 2011-12. "Ordinarily you spend the winter plowing or getting ready for plowing," said Davis, public-works chief in Doylestown, Bucks County, where the tight streets and well-used sidewalks make snow removal an adventure.
NEWS
March 18, 2001 | By James Dulley FOR THE INQUIRER
Question: The ducts for our central air-conditioning run through the attic and the registers are in the ceiling. It seems that cold air comes out of them in the winter. Is the chilly breeze my imagination? Answer: It most likely is not your imagination. The air inside the air-conditioning ducts in your attic gets cold and becomes dense. Since it is heavier than the air inside your room, it drops down and you feel it. This can create a substantial energy loss and make you uncomfortable.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jane Valdes-Dapena's garden in Media got walloped this winter, the region's coldest, snowiest, and most miserable in 20 years. Her hydrangea canes are crispy and hollow, with just a few new leaves sprouting from the base. The shrub roses, typically robust in spring, are practically bare. And that big pot of rosemary, 10 years on the terrace? "Dead as a doornail," says Valdes-Dapena, development associate at the Community Arts Center in Wallingford and an experienced gardener.
NEWS
November 18, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
PISCATAWAY, N.J. - What kind of winter will it be? Severe as last year's, or milder like two previous ones? Can an early snow in Siberia affect weather in Philadelphia, and what impact will El NiƱo have? Rutgers University's Global Snow Lab in Piscataway tries to answer those questions using raw federal data on the snow cover in North America and Eurasia to create maps and long-term climate records to aid forecasting. Bottom line, the winter of 2014-15 will likely be "volatile" across the region, said New Jersey state climatologist David Robinson, director of the snow lab. "I've been standoffish until now" to make a prediction.
NEWS
October 4, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Expect temperatures 6 degrees colder than last winter's, and a six-fold increase -- or more -- in snowfall. In short, if Accu-Weather's winter outlook turns out to be right, the coming season will be whole lot more like a typical winter than in 2011-12. In the forecast released this morning, an update and elaboration of an earlier outlook, the commercial weather service in State College, Pa., is calling for near-normal temperatures this winter, with above-normal snowfall. In addition, Accu-Weather believes Philadelphia will have an above-average number of days -- perhaps seven -- with snowfall of an inch or more, said long-range forecaster Paul Pastelok.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 15, 2015 | By John Moritz, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was just before 2 a.m. when Mary Noll's cellphone rang to the tune of the Beatles' "Help!" - and the 60-year-old Lower Gwynedd woman knew she was needed urgently. In nearby Norristown, firefighters were battling a four-alarm fire at an apartment complex. Noll, a volunteer disaster response captain for the Red Cross in eastern Montgomery County, began making calls to assemble her team for the night. Starting early that morning and working throughout the day, 10 volunteers and four Red Cross staffers gathered food and medical supplies, set up a shelter for evacuees at a high school, provided counseling, and eventually found hotel rooms for those still displaced the next night.
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Joseph Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Medford Township police are seeking help in finding two intruders who beat and bound a 64-year-old man during a home-invasion robbery over the weekend. The pair apparently arrived on bicycles and abandoned them, fleeing in the victim's 2010 Cadillac and an undisclosed amount of cash, police said. The break-in occurred about 10:30 p.m. Sunday at the home on Chief Massasoit Road, police said. The intruders duct-taped the resident to a chair and hit him with "a pipe or similar object," while demanding money, police said in a statement.
NEWS
February 12, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
After crashes involving 40 vehicles left a Burlington County man dead and scores of motorists injured Monday night, New Jersey Turnpike officials defended how they had prepared the roadway for winter weather even as the state's transportation chief called for a review of the accident. "That was an awful thing that happened out there last night," turnpike spokesman Tom Feeney said Tuesday evening. "And we are really committed to not allowing things like that to happen. " Feeney said a former turnpike maintenance director who criticized the salting efforts was "clueless.
SPORTS
February 10, 2015 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Columnist
THE GALAXY is dimming at an alarming rate. Kobe and Peyton ground to a rusty halt over the past few weeks, but hope sprang in the world of golf. No other sport offers the promise of renewal in the worst of February's doldrums; scenes of Hawaii, California and Arizona, dazzling green, while much of the rest of the country slumbers under icy white. Then, the stars fell. Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson failed to reach the weekend in consecutive weeks. They played two punch-line tournaments, and never were a factor.
NEWS
February 6, 2015
WHEN THE SUN is swallowed all day by gray skies and gloom, when the streets turn black with week-old slush, when even double IPAs taste like rock salt, a Philadelphian can't help but think about getting out of town. Here are 10 beer-soaked destinations to consider: 1. Lititz, Pa. This quaint Lancaster County town boasts three brewpubs, including JoBoy's, where southern barbecue is also on the menu. After a stop at the Sturgis Pretzel House, grab a bite and a brew at Bulls Head Public House, along the shop-filled main drag.
NEWS
January 30, 2015 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
WE CAN'T all afford to vacation in Vail, Colo., this winter. If "jet setting" with your family is more about pointing the minivan in any direction but the garage, this is the winter to discover, or rediscover, the Pocono Mountains. Like the girl next door who you tend to overlook at parties, the Pocono Mountains may seem familiar but not really that sexy. Until you take a closer look. This sprawling swath of northeastern Pennsylvania encompasses 2,400 square miles that traverse Carbon, Monroe, Pike and Wayne counties - terrain chockablock with snowy vistas, dense woodlands and respectable mountain peaks.
NEWS
January 28, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA & JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writers vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
IN ROMAN mythology, the goddess Juno is hailed as a protector, a guardian of her people. A different "Juno" is bearing down on the Philly region and doesn't seem interested in protecting anyone. Winter Storm Juno forced the city's public schools to close today. Meteorologists had tracked the formidable storm all week, and it was expected to hit the city late last night, bringing heavy snowfall and powerful winds. Last night, the forecast from the National Weather Service called for 10 to 14 inches of snow, the brunt of it expected early this morning.
NEWS
January 27, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
A storm forecasters warned could become a "crippling and potentially historic blizzard" for New York City and New England might dump as much as two feet of snow around the Philadelphia region. The wintry blast was expected to begin softly overnight into Monday morning, with one to three inches of snow certain to complicate the early rush hour. The National Weather Service said a second, behemoth storm would arrive Monday evening, slamming the region with 14 to 24 inches into Tuesday, with wind gusts as high as 30 m.p.h.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Learn about winter's effects on Schuylkill aquatic life at the Fairmount Water Works during this week's Science Saturdays program, "Fish: Playing it Cool in Winter. " From 2 to 4 p.m., you'll learn about the lifestyles of aquatic cold-blooded species and how they survive in the Schuylkill during the cold months. Also find out the physical differences between cold and hot water, and how they affect water creatures. Plus, you can make a fish to take home. Science Saturdays, 2 to 4 p.m. at Water Works Interpretive Center, 640 Waterworks Dr. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays to Saturdays; 1 to 5 p.m. Sundays.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's a given in the gardening world that wintertime is for resting, recharging, and reimagining our next - and best - garden ever. But, increasingly, the off-season is for learning. The Philadelphia region, which immodestly but accurately touts itself as "America's garden capital," with 30 public gardens, arboretums and historic landscapes within 30 miles of the city, offers scores of classes, workshops and programs to keep you in the game till spring. You can find the whole collection at www.americasgardencapital.org . On Jan. 24, for example, a panel of Barnes Arboretum School graduates will present an hourlong program on careers in horticulture at the Barnes Foundation on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway.
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