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Winter

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NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA - The mountainous, blackening snow piles, record power outages, winter-strafed roadbeds, and legions of defeated trees. All argue for the singular ferocity of the winter of 2013-14. Dr. Theodore A. Christopher has witnessed something else, and if the weather community isn't ready to rank this season on the severity scale, he is. "This is the worst," said Christopher, the director of emergency medicine at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, where he has worked for 30 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014
UNDOUBTEDLY, this has been my winter of discontent. As much as I hate to admit it, and in spite of my valiant efforts, I was TKO'd by winter weight gain. For years, I categorized winter weight-gain theories as old wives' tales or urban myths. Until this year, when I was overtaken by this monster who had an insatiable appetite - for chocolate, in particular, but also an unrelenting desire for Herr's potato chips and my favorite vegan peanut butter bars. If I was unsure before, I'm very clear about this now!
SPORTS
December 18, 1990 | By Mayer Brandschain, Special to The Inquirer
Bob Sheppard of Five Ponds Country Club and Brian Kelly of Plymouth Country Club birdied the last two holes to finish in a first-place tie at 9-under-par 62 with Gene Kazan of Medford Village Country Club and Dave Quinn of Burlington Country Club in a two-player scramble in the Five Ponds Winter Golf League yesterday at Five Ponds.
NEWS
August 24, 2014 | By Leah Kochenour, Inquirer Staff Writer
Summer is coming to a close, but some of the region's road crews might be wondering if last winter is ever going to end. "We're still in the midst of treating roads that suffered extensive damage during the winter," said Eugene Blaum, spokesman for the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. From Dec. 1 through Aug. 14, he said, PennDot used 15,922 tons of patching material on the region's roads - about double what it used during the comparable periods in the previous two years combined.
NEWS
February 29, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood and Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
For John Davis, it was a dream winter - over by Halloween. That would have been just after a freak Oct. 29 storm of heavy, wet snow collapsed tree limbs, ripped down power lines and set Davis and his public-works colleagues throughout the region to worrying: Here we go again. But after back-to-back brutal winters, neither Davis - nor his peers nor the best minds of meteorology - imagined that storm would be the very worst of the "winter" of 2011-12. "Ordinarily you spend the winter plowing or getting ready for plowing," said Davis, public-works chief in Doylestown, Bucks County, where the tight streets and well-used sidewalks make snow removal an adventure.
NEWS
March 18, 2001 | By James Dulley FOR THE INQUIRER
Question: The ducts for our central air-conditioning run through the attic and the registers are in the ceiling. It seems that cold air comes out of them in the winter. Is the chilly breeze my imagination? Answer: It most likely is not your imagination. The air inside the air-conditioning ducts in your attic gets cold and becomes dense. Since it is heavier than the air inside your room, it drops down and you feel it. This can create a substantial energy loss and make you uncomfortable.
NEWS
January 13, 2014 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
After two winters that were virtually holidays from ice, winter has returned with an expensive vengeance for the region's road departments. With the typical peak snow period still a few weeks away, the region already has had nearly a season's worth of snowfall - spiced with generous portions of ice - and the plowing and salting bills are piling up faster than the pothole complaints. The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation has spent more than two-thirds of its total seasonal snow-fighting budget, and the New Jersey Department has shelled out more than twice what it did during the entire winter of 2011-12.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jane Valdes-Dapena's garden in Media got walloped this winter, the region's coldest, snowiest, and most miserable in 20 years. Her hydrangea canes are crispy and hollow, with just a few new leaves sprouting from the base. The shrub roses, typically robust in spring, are practically bare. And that big pot of rosemary, 10 years on the terrace? "Dead as a doornail," says Valdes-Dapena, development associate at the Community Arts Center in Wallingford and an experienced gardener.
NEWS
October 4, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Expect temperatures 6 degrees colder than last winter's, and a six-fold increase -- or more -- in snowfall. In short, if Accu-Weather's winter outlook turns out to be right, the coming season will be whole lot more like a typical winter than in 2011-12. In the forecast released this morning, an update and elaboration of an earlier outlook, the commercial weather service in State College, Pa., is calling for near-normal temperatures this winter, with above-normal snowfall. In addition, Accu-Weather believes Philadelphia will have an above-average number of days -- perhaps seven -- with snowfall of an inch or more, said long-range forecaster Paul Pastelok.
NEWS
February 17, 2014 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
After last week's megastorm that solidified the legacy of the winter of 2013-14, one meteorologist confidently pronounced: "The back of winter is broken. " If that, indeed, is the case, those who have been shoveling the thousands of pounds of this stuff or have spent days without heat or lights likely would agree that winter is getting precisely what it deserves. "It's been a long, cold winter," said Bruce Terry, senior forecaster at the government's National Weather Center, in College Park, Md. "If you like snow, it's a bonanza.
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SPORTS
October 24, 2014 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Basketball, wrestling, and indoor track teams in the Colonial Conference and Cape-Atlantic League will be able to start practice on Nov. 24. The same likely will be true for many teams in the Burlington County Scholastic League. But teams in the Olympic Conference will have to wait a week and won't be able to start the winter season until Dec. 1. That staggered start is a result of a decision made by the Olympic Conference to overrule a pilot program established by the NJSIAA in September to allow boys' and girls' basketball teams to start practice on the Monday before Thanksgiving.
REAL_ESTATE
September 28, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
  With fall here and winter on its way, it might be time to straighten out the garage, so you can at least find the snow shovels when you need them. "Will it be another bad winter, Al?" you ask. I'll tell you when it's over. In the meantime, the Lehigh Group, maker of Crawford brand garage and home-workshop organization products, recommends cleaning out the space originally designed for cars, suggesting that clutter there might mask hidden dangers. "Seventy percent of Americans use the garage to store potentially dangerous equipment such as saws and power tools, while nearly 60 percent store flammable liquids, such as oil, gasoline, propane and kerosene, as well as other dangerous chemicals, including pesticides and other lawn-care products in their garage space," the company says.
NEWS
September 12, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
FROM SWEDEN comes news of a zoo ape that hoards rocks in the morning to throw at human gawkers later in the day. And while the rock-hoarding is cited as exciting evidence of the animal's higher intelligence, it does not improve his current and apparently unhappy situation. He'd be better off waving a copy of "Blackfish," the influential documentary about captive whales that turned public opinion against commercial theme-park exploitation of meant-to-be-wild creatures. Which brings us to "Dolphin Tale 2," which dutifully ponders the ethical fine points of providing a man-made home for bottle-nose dolphins that cannot survive in the open sea. Its celebrated real-life case study, told in "Dolphin Tale," is that of Winter, a dolphin that needed a prosthetic tail.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Outerwear is reclaiming its role as cold weather's chicest statement piece with cozy capes, edgy leathers, and colorful furs dressing up the season's trendy yet plain silhouettes. "The novelty is in the coat this fall," said Susan Ahn of Eaves, a women's boutique in Wayne. "There are a lot of luxurious combinations, mixed media and textures . . . there is so much texture. " Well before the end of August, coats dominated front-of-store displays at apparel retailers from J.C. Penney to Saks.
NEWS
August 25, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
COME SEPT. 1, there's going to plenty of foot-stomping, hand-wringing and pouting in the city. No, the outbursts won't be coming from dejected kids who are headed back to school. The adults will be the ones pitching a fit - because the curtains are scheduled to fall that day on the Spruce Street Harbor Park. (It's OK. We feel your pain. Go ahead, kick something.) The wildly popular, partially floating park at the Penn's Landing Marina has drawn about 35,000 visitors a week since opening on July 21, said Emma Fried-Cassorla, spokeswoman for the Delaware River Waterfront Corp., the nonprofit behind the newfound destination spot.
NEWS
August 24, 2014 | By Leah Kochenour, Inquirer Staff Writer
Summer is coming to a close, but some of the region's road crews might be wondering if last winter is ever going to end. "We're still in the midst of treating roads that suffered extensive damage during the winter," said Eugene Blaum, spokesman for the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. From Dec. 1 through Aug. 14, he said, PennDot used 15,922 tons of patching material on the region's roads - about double what it used during the comparable periods in the previous two years combined.
SPORTS
August 22, 2014 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
A.J. BURNETT'S answer wasn't definitive, but it did reinforce the widely held belief that the veteran pitcher would lean toward retirement when the 2014 season ends. After taking the mound for his 27th start of the season on Tuesday night, Burnett earned himself a half-million dollars (a performance bonus in his contract) and set himself up to make $1.5 million more for next year, too. Burnett's player option for the 2015 season can increase twice more this season if and when he reaches 30 and 32 starts on the season.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a tucked-away corner of West Mount Airy, officials of a longtime cultural center have been concerned that the sound of bagpipes and the rhythmic clatter of Irish dancing could go silent. Citing financial concerns, leaders of the Commodore John Barry Irish Center, a focal point in the region for all things Irish, from music and dancing to art and history, said it had come close to being forced to shut down. Sean McMenamin, a board member at the center at 6815 Emlen St., said the convergence this winter of increased city taxes, higher-than-usual heating bills, and required upgrades to its 10,000-square-foot, two-story building had put the center in a precarious financial situation.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jane Valdes-Dapena's garden in Media got walloped this winter, the region's coldest, snowiest, and most miserable in 20 years. Her hydrangea canes are crispy and hollow, with just a few new leaves sprouting from the base. The shrub roses, typically robust in spring, are practically bare. And that big pot of rosemary, 10 years on the terrace? "Dead as a doornail," says Valdes-Dapena, development associate at the Community Arts Center in Wallingford and an experienced gardener.
NEWS
April 20, 2014 | By Andrew Parent, Inquirer Staff Writer
When she decided to join her middle school's track team in seventh grade, Dasia Pressley did it only for the social benefit. "Getting into a sport is the best way to meet friends," Pressley said. "I definitely wasn't one of the faster girls then. " In fact, Neshaminy coach Margie Taylor had not heard of the young sprinter before her graduation to the high-school ranks. "Sometimes, if they have a good runner, the middle-school coaches will contact me and let me know she's coming up," Taylor said.
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