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Winter Olympics

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SPORTS
February 17, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
SOCHI - At an International Olympic Committee briefing last week, the world's sports journalists witnessed an odd but revealing juxtaposition, one that not so long ago would have been impossible to imagine. Sage Kotsenburg, the gold-medal-winning American snowboard dude in sweatsuit and knit cap, was sharing a podium with Christoffe Dubi, the suave, nattily dressed Swiss who is the IOC's director of sports. The pairing was indicative of the wildly successful union of what once were polar-opposite institutions, the stodgy, European-dominated IOC and the rebellious, U.S. extreme-sport community.
NEWS
January 11, 1987 | By Rob Buchanan, Special to The Inquirer
Albert Who? That's the question sports fans around the world have been asking since Oct. 17, the day the International Olympic Committee (IOC) named a host for the 1992 Winter Olympics. Partly as a tribute to Baron Pierre de Coubertin, the Frenchman who in 1892 first called for the revival of the ancient Games, the IOC chose a site in the French Alps. Surprisingly, though, it wasn't Chamonix, where the inaugural Winter Games were held in 1924; neither was it Grenoble, where in 1968 the dashing Jean-Claude Killy skied off with three gold medals.
NEWS
February 26, 1988 | BY DONALD KAUL
Is it just me or are the Winter Olympics a dud? Admittedly, I've never been one of your big fans of the Winter Games. To me, watching someone slide down a patch of ice at 90 mph compares unfavorably with waiting for a bus. Still, in other years there has been a certain entertainment value, a sense of excitement. Not this year. For one thing, nobody American wins anything. Well, hardly anything. A couple of gold medals here, a silver there, a bronze, but it seems that every time they set someone up as a hero, he or she falls down.
NEWS
February 9, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
SOCHI - Russia, a nation whose history and culture are as vast as its birch forests and grassy steppes, relied heavily on both Friday night, launching the 2014 Winter Olympics with an opening ceremony that was as ethereal as it was emotionally pleasing for the 40,000 spectators at Fisht Olympic Stadium. While President Vladimir Putin had hoped his country's first Winter Games would showcase the new Russia, it was instead its rich artistic past that dominated. The nearly three-hour spectacle igniting the most expensive Olympic Games ever, winter or summer, was infused by Tchaikovsky's music, by the ballet of the Bolshoi, and by the moody literature of Tolstoy and Dostoyevsky.
SPORTS
August 28, 2013 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
ARLINGTON, Va. - Peter Laviolette has his name engraved on the Stanley Cup. He is the second winningest American-born coach in NHL history. He was the head coach of the 2006 U.S. Olympic team in Turin, Italy. He is a two-time Olympian as a player. Laviolette served as the captain of Team USA in 1994 in Lillehammer, Norway, and skated alongside Brian Leetch in Calgary in 1988. Yet, if you ask Laviolette about one of his fondest hockey memories - through his 11-year player career and 389 wins as an NHL coach - he will tell you about leading a group of misfit Americans to a bronze medal at the 2004 World Championships.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1994 | By Lee Winfrey, INQUIRER TV WRITER
Here are plums awarded and darts thrown by a critic after watching television coverage of the XVII Winter Olympic Games from Lillehammer, Norway - plus three unreliable reports from Rumor Control Central. Most significant statistic. Women make up 60 percent of the viewing audience. So that's why the CBS coverage, both widely watched and broadly criticized, looked the way it did. CBS aimed not at the hard-core fans of any particular sport, but at people, women in particular, who may not watch another major sports event this year.
NEWS
February 1, 1998 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A thin sunrise filtered through a curtain of lacy snow yesterday as the chief priest of Zenkoji Temple shuffled on slippered feet toward a morning service to honor Buddha. Trailed by an attendant who held a red, rice-paper parasol above the priest's bare head, he moved along the ancient avenue toward the temple, through the menacing gate of the Deva Kings, past the cauldron belching incense - and into the shadow of the CBS broadcast studio. Like the kneeling pilgrims the priest paused to bless, television has come to the temple seeking serenity and purpose - and some nice video.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1998 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
It was one of the most stirring technical achievements in the history of the world - choruses singing simultaneously on five continents - and it was live. But CBS interrupted for commercials and for a flat, pretaped interview with figure skater Michelle Kwan. That was much more important because it might boost ratings of the network's most lucrative Olympic event, nearly two weeks away. Such is the deal we have made with the devil, who was probably the first guy, in an uncharacteristic moment of compassion, to put his arm around some poor suffering fool and whisper, "Cheer up, buddy.
NEWS
March 15, 1992 | Special to The Inquirer / JAY GORODETZER
What do you get when you combine Winter Olympics fever with a little winter cabin fever? At St. James High School in Chester, you get the indoor winter olympics - specifically, skiing races in the gymnasium. Before the basketball team gets its nets in a knot, it should be explained the participants have pieces of inverted carpet attached to the bottoms of their skis, both to save the floor and to give some distance to what would otherwise be a short journey.
SPORTS
December 8, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
The NHL must decide whether it will send its players to the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City sometime in February, commissioner Gary Bettman said. That decision will be based on how many Olympic hockey games NBC decides to broadcast in prime time that winter, Bettman said at the owners meetings in Arizona. The commissioner said he wasn't happy with CBS's coverage of the hockey tournament in the 1998 Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan. The NHL took a 17-day break to accommodate the tournament, then received little primie-time exposure.
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NEWS
May 9, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over the last several months, officials of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and Comcast Corp. secretly negotiated an unprecedented $7.75 billion contract extension to keep the Olympic Games on NBC-TV and NBC-affiliated cable networks through 2032. The new Olympics deal skipped a bidding process that, experts said, could have brought significantly higher TV rights fees for the six additional Olympic Games. But the deal also guarantees the Olympics organization billions of dollars - even if the global economy tanks, or the red-hot market for TV sports rights in the United States cools.
SPORTS
February 26, 2014 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Staff Writer
THE GOOD THING is that every Olympic year when a bunch of Philadelphia bigwigs start spouting about what a great host that their city would make, we know they are just talking out of the sides of their necks for a publicity hit. It's not that Philadelphia could not pull it off; rather, the Olympic Games - Winter or Summer - simply are not worth the amount of costs, resources and inconveniences that come with them. Russia poured a record $51 billion into the just-completed 2014 Sochi Winter Games, but what did it really get out of them?
NEWS
February 22, 2014 | By Jerry Iannelli, Inquirer Staff Writer
Matthew Dezii is on a bus and can't understand what anyone is saying around him. He's guarding a bag of videotapes, which sits at his feet. The bus - barreling down the side of a Russian mountain - needs to arrive on the coast of the Black Sea within the next half-hour, or NBC may not have any skiing footage for the night's telecast of the Winter Olympics. Dezii, a Haddon Township native, has been interning in Sochi with NBC Sports since Jan. 25. A junior audio production major at Ithaca College in New York, he has been used by NBC as a "runner" at its International Broadcast Center throughout the games.
SPORTS
February 18, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
KRASNAYA POLYANA, Russia - There's a point in Downhill Racer when an American coach confronts a self-centered, troublesome, but extremely talented skier, his country's best hope for Olympic gold. "All you ever had was skis," the coach tells him. "And that's not enough. " Soon Bode Miller, so like Robert Redford's headstrong character in the 1969 film, will find out if the skis were enough. Thirty-six now, he's not yet over the hill. But he's been at its summit for a while, and he can see there's not far to travel.
SPORTS
February 17, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
SOCHI - At an International Olympic Committee briefing last week, the world's sports journalists witnessed an odd but revealing juxtaposition, one that not so long ago would have been impossible to imagine. Sage Kotsenburg, the gold-medal-winning American snowboard dude in sweatsuit and knit cap, was sharing a podium with Christoffe Dubi, the suave, nattily dressed Swiss who is the IOC's director of sports. The pairing was indicative of the wildly successful union of what once were polar-opposite institutions, the stodgy, European-dominated IOC and the rebellious, U.S. extreme-sport community.
SPORTS
February 14, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
SOCHI - It is a simple and seemingly benign symbol, one meant to signify Olympic ideals such as brotherhood and unity. Created about a century ago by Baron Pierre de Coubertin, the aristocratic founder of the modern Games, the now-familiar Olympic rings have enjoyed a relatively serene existence. But in one of the oddest developments at these 2014 Winter Olympics, an event so far devoid of any major troubles, the innocuous and ubiquitous symbol suddenly has become controversial.
SPORTS
February 13, 2014 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Staff Writer
I AM NOT going to defend Marcus Smart, but I do understand how and why it all went down Saturday night at Texas Tech. Smart should not have pushed Jeff Orr. He should have been suspended three games. So many forget in their zeal to back their teams that teenagers or just-past teenagers are far from finished life products. That they have earned a college scholarship to play basketball is all we really know about most of them. We see them on the court. Somehow, they become just players, but not people.
NEWS
February 9, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
SOCHI - Russia, a nation whose history and culture are as vast as its birch forests and grassy steppes, relied heavily on both Friday night, launching the 2014 Winter Olympics with an opening ceremony that was as ethereal as it was emotionally pleasing for the 40,000 spectators at Fisht Olympic Stadium. While President Vladimir Putin had hoped his country's first Winter Games would showcase the new Russia, it was instead its rich artistic past that dominated. The nearly three-hour spectacle igniting the most expensive Olympic Games ever, winter or summer, was infused by Tchaikovsky's music, by the ballet of the Bolshoi, and by the moody literature of Tolstoy and Dostoyevsky.
NEWS
February 8, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
HUNTINGDON VALLEY H. Lawrence Reinhard III is hardly the first parent to clash with a stepchild. But it was the lengths to which that animosity drove the 69-year-old Huntingdon Valley man that set off an international manhunt, squandered law enforcement resources, and spread unwarranted fears in the run-up to the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, federal authorities said Thursday. FBI agents allege that Reinhard fabricated an elaborate tale implicating his stepson in a plot to bomb the Winter Games, and sent investigators from Philadelphia to Moscow scrambling.
SPORTS
February 7, 2014 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Columnist
FLYERS CHAIRMAN Ed Snider came down to talk to reporters after the game. He came to say a few kind words about the late Keith Allen, the architect of all of the franchise's early successes, words to accompany the nice tribute that the team staged before the game for Allen, who died Tuesday at the age of 90. Then Ed stayed around to chat. And it was like the old days. The target this night was the Olympics, and pretty much everything touched by those five interlocking rings.
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