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Winter Storm

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NEWS
February 18, 2000 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
It may be nasty. But it's probably not going to last very long. Philly is in line for "just about everything" today - snow, ice, pouring-down rain and maybe even a thunderstorm, says Accu-Weather meteorologist Mark Tobin. With a freezing morning giving way to temperatures rising through the 40s, today's interruption in the February thaw looks like a one-day agony. A couple of hours of snow after daybreak, a couple of hours of ice - and a probable mess on the highways and sidewalks - will give way to "good, soaking rains" and gusty winds later today, said Tobin.
NEWS
January 28, 1988 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
The first flakes came down in clumps like miniature snowballs thrown from the sky. They landed with gentle puffs, covering everything with cottonlike icing. The snow earlier this week turned the area into a winter dream for children, but a nightmare for drivers. The two cross-country skiers appeared silently out of the woods adjacent to Temple University's Ambler campus and glided across the deserted playing fields. As quickly as they appeared before the few hardy students at the school Monday, they were out of sight, disappearing into the bright night.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | Associated Press
ATLANTA - A winter storm made its way across the Southeast on Thursday, dumping snow in states recovering from days of rain, playing a role in at least one fatality, and leaving thousands without power. Early Thursday, parts of Mississippi saw 2 to 4 inches of snow on the ground. In Lowndes County, Highway Patrol spokesman Cpl. Criss Turnipseed said that Johnnie A. Matthews, 64, of West Point, died when his car hit a downed tree about 5 a.m. on Mississippi Highway 50. No other fatalities have been reported.
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | By Holly Ramer, Associated Press
CONCORD, N.H. - A muted version of a winter storm that has killed more than a dozen people across the eastern half of the country plodded across the Northeast on Thursday, trapping airliners in snow or mud and frustrating travelers still trying to return home after Christmas. The storm, which was blamed for at least 16 deaths farther south and west, brought plenty of wind, rain and snow to the Northeast when it blew in Wednesday night. Lights generally remained on and cars mostly stayed on the road, unlike many harder-hit places including Arkansas, where 200,000 homes and businesses lost power.
NEWS
December 6, 2005 | By Natalie Pompilio and Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The Philadelphia region was hit by its first major winter storm yesterday, with people bracing for as much as 5 inches of snow in the city and a few inches more for the suburbs to the south and in South Jersey. The first flakes began falling just after commuters hit the roadways, but no major problems or accidents were reported during the evening rush. Today was expected to be mostly cloudy in the morning with highs in the 30s. More snow - perhaps mixed with rain - was expected to hit the area Friday.
NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Peter Mucha, Philly.com Staff Writer
What's up with the Weather Channel naming a scourge of winter after a beloved Philly icon? Yo, can you believe it? The big storm sweeping the country is named Rocky ? As in Rocky Balboa? As in the title boxer of the 1976 best-picture winner? The guy who famously ran up the Art Museum steps to a tune often played at Philly sporting events? Well, not exactly. Maybe yes. Maybe no. Even if Rocky's trainer, Mickey, did famously declare, "You're gonna eat lightnin' and you're gonna crap thunder!"
BUSINESS
November 11, 1999 | By Leslie J. Nicholson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Relax. But make some modest plans just in case. Nobody really knows what will happen, but according to experts, U.S. consumers should experience little more than an occasional inconvenience as a result of the Year 2000 computer problem. This applies especially in big metropolitan areas such as Philadelphia. With 51 days remaining before the dawn of the new year, the consensus is that serious Y2K problems are more likely to occur in other countries. Domestically, the main glitches are expected in small towns and rural communities, and among small businesses.
NEWS
February 4, 1995 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Dan Rubin and correspondent Jane Reynolds contributed to this article
The region was due to be hit today by the most potent winter storm since the blizzard of March 1993, ending one of the quietest stretches of winter weather in local history. Forecasters predicted anywhere from a few inches to a foot of snow, and 40 to 50 m.p.h. winds. Regardless of how much snow falls, meteorologists said the storm signaled a major change in the weather patterns that had governed the winter. In short, February will actually feel like February. Whatever is on the ground by tonight is expected to freeze solid, and the storm will be followed by the coldest weather of the season.
NEWS
December 30, 1997 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / JONATHAN WILSON
Just in case, PennDot workers in Swedesford prepared yesterday for a winter storm that was expected to mainly bring heavy rain to the Philadelphia area.
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NEWS
March 26, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
Pennsylvania and New Jersey stand to receive more than $85 million in federal disaster money to pay for costs associated with the January blizzard. President Obama signed a "major disaster" declaration Wednesday that made Federal Emergency Management Agency funds available to 22 of the 67 counties in Pennsylvania. He signed a similar declaration last week for 17 of New Jersey's 22 counties. Locally, Bucks, Burlington, Camden, Chester, Montgomery, and Philadelphia Counties qualified for the assistance under the complicated federal requirements for damage thresholds.
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
President Obama authorized federal aid Tuesday to assist New Jersey with its recovery from January's winter storm, which caused flooding along the Shore and left record snowfall in some areas. The storm caused about $83 million in damage, according to the state. Obama on Tuesday approved Gov. Christie's request last month that the president declare that a major disaster exists in New Jersey, opening the door for federal funding. The state must undergo an application process to receive aid from the Federal Emergency Management Agency.
NEWS
February 10, 2016 | By Emily Babay, Staff Writer
Several inches of snow are possible in the Philadelphia region.  A dusting fell overnight with more expected later today  and a coastal flood warning is in effect for the New Jersey and Delaware coasts. The National Weather Service posted a winter storm warning through Tuesday night for the immediate Philadelphia area, calling for about 2 to 4 inches of snow, with possibly a bit more to the west. American Airlines announced it would waive ticket change fees and fare differences for customers who want to put off traveling because of the storm.
NEWS
February 1, 2016
NEW YORK Man slashed on subway platform Police say a man was slashed in the face in the sixth such attack in the New York subway and on streets this year. The 27-year-old victim was assaulted Sunday morning in a Harlem station. He was waiting for a No. 2 train just after 3 a.m. while arguing with a woman on the platform. Police say that after she asked another man for help, he slashed the victim and fled. Last Monday, a 71-year-old woman was slashed on a train pulling into Manhattan's Broadway-Lafayette station.
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
Ahead of the winter storm expected here beginning Friday, airlines announced they will waive ticket change fees and fare differences for customers who want to postpone travel. American Airlines, which operates 76 percent of flights at Philadelphia International Airport, said passengers flying between Jan. 21 and Jan. 24 can change their tickets, and delay travel as late as Jan. 27 at airports from New Hampshire south to North Carolina and Tennessee. Delta and United airlines will waive change fees for passengers traveling Jan. 22-24.
NEWS
April 4, 2015 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
The innocuous forecast that appeared on the front page of The Inquirer on April 3, 1915, the Saturday before Easter, did not evoke images of panic in the streets: "Unsettled, rain likely. " What followed, however, was one of the more amazing meteorological events in the history of local weather observations - a 12-hour siege of heavy snow that mocked meteorologists and the powerful April sun by accumulating 19 inches. An additional 0.4 fell on Easter. "Easter plans blew up with a bang," proclaimed the Evening Bulletin.
NEWS
January 28, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA & JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writers vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
IN ROMAN mythology, the goddess Juno is hailed as a protector, a guardian of her people. A different "Juno" is bearing down on the Philly region and doesn't seem interested in protecting anyone. Winter Storm Juno forced the city's public schools to close today. Meteorologists had tracked the formidable storm all week, and it was expected to hit the city late last night, bringing heavy snowfall and powerful winds. Last night, the forecast from the National Weather Service called for 10 to 14 inches of snow, the brunt of it expected early this morning.
NEWS
January 28, 2015 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sam Phillips was excited as a schoolgirl with a snow day. In her case, the glow in her eyes came from the prospect of spending the night in the bowels of the Philadelphia Fire Department's headquarters on Spring Garden Street. If she were lucky, she might even catch a few hours of sleep on her office floor. "This is the part of the job I really enjoy," said Phillips, director of the city's Office of Emergency Management (OEM). "This is where you get to test your concepts, to test your plans.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Too many customers received mixed messages, contradictory messages - or no message at all - from their electric utilities during the massive February ice storm, according to state regulators. The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission on Monday documented shortcomings in the way Peco Energy Co. and other electric utilities communicated with customers during the storm, which knocked out 960,000 customers, including 724,000 Peco customers. While generally commending the utilities' response, the PUC made 11 recommendations - mostly regarding outreach with customers and local governments.
NEWS
March 3, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The winter storms so far have cost Northampton Township taxpayers $600,000 - double what the town had budgeted and enough of an economic toll to delay plans to repave some roads. So the Bucks County community calculated what it could get if the federal government decides to help. The answer: $20,000, at most. "I'll never turn the money down," Township Manager Robert Pellegrino said. "But it's not going to matter in the grand scheme of things. " Unlike devastating floods or hurricanes, federal aid for winter-related storms - no matter how disruptive - is often far less generous.
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