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Wisdom Teeth

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NEWS
January 28, 2002 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Your dentist has just advised you to have your wisdom teeth removed, even though they are not causing any problems. Is this a word to the wise, or jumping the, er, gum? Wisdom teeth, of course, are the molars that sit farthest back in the mouth, two in the upper jaw and two in the lower. Technically called third molars, these are the last teeth to develop, usually appearing in the late teens or early twenties - supposedly about the time wisdom shows up. For decades, dentists and oral surgeons have urged young adults to get rid of wisdom teeth that are "impacted" - below the gum and blocked from growing in normally - in order to avoid trouble down the line.
SPORTS
August 5, 1998 | By Phil Sheridan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like a lion with a thorn in his paw, Tra Thomas could find his official Eagles debut postponed by an unlikely ailment. Thomas, the Eagles' first-round draft pick, had four wisdom teeth extracted yesterday morning. He was in a lot of pain, according to head coach Ray Rhodes, and his availability will be decided on a day-to-day basis. Thomas was not on the practice field for either session yesterday. Rhodes said Thomas was in his dorm room, sleeping off the surgery. Because of the timing, Thomas could miss tomorrow night's preseason opener against the New York Jets.
SPORTS
July 28, 2001 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennridge's Sam Hollenbach, who is one of the top quarterback prospects in the state, has made an oral commitment to Maryland. The 6-foot-5, 210-pounder, who is set to enter his senior season, informed the Maryland coaches of his decision late Thursday evening. Hollenbach, whose father, Jeff, is the head coach at Pennridge, was unavailable for comment yesterday because he had wisdom teeth pulled. According to Jeff Hollenbach, his son chose Maryland over Pittsburgh, Michigan State, and Penn State.
NEWS
December 5, 1989 | By John Roach, Special to The Inquirer
Last week, Archbishop Carroll basketball coach Chet Walsh had his wisdom teeth removed. Unfortunately for him, that might be the easy part of his season. Along with his wisdom teeth, Walsh lost his entire starting lineup from last year because of graduation. "I lost everything," Walsh said. "Our front line was 6 foot, 7 inches; 6-4, 6-4, and 6-3. We also lost the team's top five leading scorers. " The Patriots went to the Catholic League playoffs before losing a first- round game to Roman Catholic.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: I understand that the tailbone is one of those things from our evolutionary past. What other body parts are also believed to be part of our evolutionary past?   Answer: The tailbone is the remnant of a tail, something all mammals have at some point in their development. Although it no longer serves its original function of assisting with balance, it still provides an attachment point for muscles in the low back, pelvis, and buttocks. The appendix is another vestigial structure, believed to aid in the digestion of plant material and cellulose fiber.
SPORTS
May 11, 2008 | By Jeff McLane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Brent Carter was one of four Penn State players from the area in King of Prussia for yesterday's Nittany Lion Club fund-raiser, and yet the redshirt sophomore was the only one still without a definite position. For now, Carter is a tailback. He was recruited out of Pottsgrove as a running back, but was briefly moved to safety, only to return to the offensive backfield midseason last year because of numbers. He practiced at tailback all spring, but coach Joe Paterno isn't sure if Carter will stay there.
SPORTS
December 13, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
Whatever "evident progress" is, Knicks coach Isiah Thomas has the full season to show it. That's good news for Thomas. The bad news? His boss hasn't seen enough of it yet. "If we end up the season where we are now, in terms of this development, I think we would all be disappointed," Madison Square Garden chairman James Dolan said yesterday. "I don't mean in terms of the record, just, I mean, in terms of the execution of the team, the performance of the team. " Dolan spoke to the media for the first time since June, when he gave Thomas one season as coach to show evident progress with the players he assembled as team president or be out of both jobs.
SPORTS
December 15, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
Hornets owner George Shinn is now leaning toward playing a full home schedule in New Orleans, backing away from the idea of asking the NBA's permission to play some home games in Oklahoma City next season. "Probably the best thing to do is give it a 100 percent chance here, and if it doesn't work it doesn't work. And if it works, God bless us," Shinn said yesterday. Shinn said progress continues in talks with a group of New Orleans businessmen that is expected to buy a minority share of the team and then use its influence in the community to promote and sell the team.
SPORTS
October 14, 1996 | By Joe Santoliquito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Pat Lancianese thought he had it tough when he had his wisdom teeth pulled last Monday. After the senior fullback helped Chichester to a 21-8 victory over Penn Wood in a Del-Val League game Saturday, Lancianese had to wonder which was more painful: the oral surgery or the miscues and sloppiness of his team. Lancianese rushed for a game-high 86 yards on 17 carries and a touchdown - and he had two fumble recoveries on defense - to help the Eagles to a 4-3 overall mark. Penn Wood fell to 1-6 overall and 0-2 in the Del-Val National.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2004 | By Amy Phillips FOR THE INQUIRER
Here's one surefire way for a musician to get noticed: Write a song about a popular celebrity, and how her fake plastic lifestyle will lead to a tragic downfall. That's exactly what singer-songwriter Adam Green, 23, did with "Jessica," a melancholy, string-laden ode to cream-puff pop singer-cum-reality show star Jessica Simpson "It wasn't like I set out to write a song about some celebrity, and then I picked Jessica Simpson," Green says on the phone from a tour stop in Canada. "I just saw a picture of her in a teen magazine, and later that day I found myself in the middle of writing a song about her. At the time, I thought the lyrics were only placeholders for the melody, so I wouldn't forget it. But as the days went by, I ended up keeping those words.
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NEWS
July 10, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
ARIANA GRANDE picked the wrong L.A. place to venti about her homeland. Caught on video licking doughnuts at Lake Elsinore's Wolfee Donuts and shouting, "I hate Americans. I hate America," Ariana issued the requisite apology yesterday. "I am EXTREMELY proud to be an American and I've always made it clear that I love my country," she said, per People magazine. "What I said in a private moment with my friend, who was buying the donuts, was taken out of context and I am sorry for not using more discretion with my choice of words.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: I understand that the tailbone is one of those things from our evolutionary past. What other body parts are also believed to be part of our evolutionary past?   Answer: The tailbone is the remnant of a tail, something all mammals have at some point in their development. Although it no longer serves its original function of assisting with balance, it still provides an attachment point for muscles in the low back, pelvis, and buttocks. The appendix is another vestigial structure, believed to aid in the digestion of plant material and cellulose fiber.
SPORTS
September 10, 2010 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
The way he described it, DeSean Jackson endured more pain from having his wisdom teeth pulled than from the blow Eric Berry dealt him two weeks ago. If that was indeed the case, and the Eagles wide receiver brushed off the head-on collision with the Chiefs' rookie safety, maybe Jackson is more durable than some believe. But the upper back/neck injury was the second injury of the preseason to Jackson's spinal area, and it raised some concern about the fragility of arguably the NFL's most explosive playmaker.
SPORTS
May 13, 2008
IT'S NOT THE job of Eagles coach Andy Reid to make the job of the media easier. Conversely, it's not our job to make his job the information-controlled Shangri-La most coaches are seeking. The media is not here to serve as the Eagles' mouthpiece, to put a positive spin on everything that comes out of the NovaCare Complex. That's what Dave Spadaro and the other members of the official Web site of the Philadelphia Eagles are for. The relationships between the media and the subjects it covers must remain adversarial.
SPORTS
May 11, 2008 | By Jeff McLane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Brent Carter was one of four Penn State players from the area in King of Prussia for yesterday's Nittany Lion Club fund-raiser, and yet the redshirt sophomore was the only one still without a definite position. For now, Carter is a tailback. He was recruited out of Pottsgrove as a running back, but was briefly moved to safety, only to return to the offensive backfield midseason last year because of numbers. He practiced at tailback all spring, but coach Joe Paterno isn't sure if Carter will stay there.
NEWS
April 21, 2008 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
'Oh what a piece of work is man," wrote Shakespeare, long before Darwin suggested just how little work went into us. Somehow, that same process that gave us reason, language and art also left us with hernias, male nipples, impacted wisdom teeth, flatulence and hiccups. One argument scientists often make against so-called intelligent design - the idea that evolution cannot by itself explain life - is that on closer inspection, we look like we've been put together by someone who didn't read the manual, or at least did a somewhat sloppy job of things.
SPORTS
December 15, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
Hornets owner George Shinn is now leaning toward playing a full home schedule in New Orleans, backing away from the idea of asking the NBA's permission to play some home games in Oklahoma City next season. "Probably the best thing to do is give it a 100 percent chance here, and if it doesn't work it doesn't work. And if it works, God bless us," Shinn said yesterday. Shinn said progress continues in talks with a group of New Orleans businessmen that is expected to buy a minority share of the team and then use its influence in the community to promote and sell the team.
SPORTS
December 13, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
Whatever "evident progress" is, Knicks coach Isiah Thomas has the full season to show it. That's good news for Thomas. The bad news? His boss hasn't seen enough of it yet. "If we end up the season where we are now, in terms of this development, I think we would all be disappointed," Madison Square Garden chairman James Dolan said yesterday. "I don't mean in terms of the record, just, I mean, in terms of the execution of the team, the performance of the team. " Dolan spoke to the media for the first time since June, when he gave Thomas one season as coach to show evident progress with the players he assembled as team president or be out of both jobs.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2004 | By Amy Phillips FOR THE INQUIRER
Here's one surefire way for a musician to get noticed: Write a song about a popular celebrity, and how her fake plastic lifestyle will lead to a tragic downfall. That's exactly what singer-songwriter Adam Green, 23, did with "Jessica," a melancholy, string-laden ode to cream-puff pop singer-cum-reality show star Jessica Simpson "It wasn't like I set out to write a song about some celebrity, and then I picked Jessica Simpson," Green says on the phone from a tour stop in Canada. "I just saw a picture of her in a teen magazine, and later that day I found myself in the middle of writing a song about her. At the time, I thought the lyrics were only placeholders for the melody, so I wouldn't forget it. But as the days went by, I ended up keeping those words.
NEWS
January 28, 2002 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Your dentist has just advised you to have your wisdom teeth removed, even though they are not causing any problems. Is this a word to the wise, or jumping the, er, gum? Wisdom teeth, of course, are the molars that sit farthest back in the mouth, two in the upper jaw and two in the lower. Technically called third molars, these are the last teeth to develop, usually appearing in the late teens or early twenties - supposedly about the time wisdom shows up. For decades, dentists and oral surgeons have urged young adults to get rid of wisdom teeth that are "impacted" - below the gum and blocked from growing in normally - in order to avoid trouble down the line.
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