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Wistar Institute

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NEWS
November 28, 1990 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two scientists who have made pioneering contributions in developing new vaccines and grains were awarded the John Scott Award and $10,000 each yesterday. The awards, which are made by the Board of Directors of City Trusts, a public agency, were given to Hilary Koprowski for his contributions to rabies research and Orville S. Vogel for inventing semidwarf wheats, which have helped increase the world's food supplies. Koprowski is director of the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia and Vogel is a professor emeritus at Washington State University in Pullman, Wash.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fresh off the construction of its gleaming, $100 million building expansion in University City, the Wistar Institute announced Thursday that it had appointed a new leader from within. Russel E. Kaufman, chief executive officer of the independent research institute since 2002, is stepping down in March to be succeeded by cancer biologist Dario C. Altieri. Altieri, 56, who left the University of Massachusetts in 2010 to head Wistar's cancer center and serve as the institute's first chief scientific officer, said that among his goals was the continued recruitment of top-notch faculty.
NEWS
July 7, 1989 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Virginia health officials have given the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia permission to conduct the first field test of a genetically engineered wildlife vaccine in North America on an uninhabited island off the Atlantic coast. While some details still need to be worked out, Wistar officials say they are optimistic that tests of their rabies vaccine will begin on Parramore Island, a barrier island about 120 miles southeast of Washington, sometime around Labor Day. "All of us here feel pretty good about the approval," said Warren B. Cheston, associate director of Wistar, the nation's oldest biomedical institute.
NEWS
May 4, 1988 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Wistar Institute in Philadelphia has asked the federal government for permission to conduct the first field tests of a genetically engineered vaccine in the United States. Institute officials said yesterday that they have asked the U.S. Department of Agriculture for approval to test an experimental rabies vaccine on raccoons and other wildlife on uninhabited islands off the coast of Virginia and South Carolina later this year. The institute is seeking to test the same vaccine that caused a storm of controversy when it was used on cattle in Azul, Argentina, in 1986.
NEWS
March 10, 1992 | By PETER BINZEN
Ralph Waldo Emerson once wrote that "an institution is the lengthened shadow of one man," and in West Philadelphia there's a classic illustration of his dictum. The institution is Wistar Institute. The man is Hilary Koprowski. When the acclaimed virologist and immunologist was named its director in 1957, Wistar, the nation's oldest independent biomedical research center, had a staff of about 30 and a budget of little more than $100,000. It was, according to one scientific publication, "a dilapidated museum.
NEWS
May 15, 1992 | By Jim Detjen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When a world-renowned institution reaches its 100th birthday, a gala celebration is usually in order. But that won't happen this year at the Wistar Institute, the nation's oldest independent biomedical research center. Because of a bitter internal dispute that has rocked the venerable West Philadelphia institution and spilled over into the courts, Wistar officials have taken the unusual step of postponing the centennial celebration until 1994. Some scientists fear that the controversy - which involves Nobel Prize winners, millionaires, lifesaving medical technology and international biotechnology companies - is damaging the center's international reputation and may even jeopardize its existence.
NEWS
April 8, 1993 | By Jim Detjen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Wistar Institute and its former director, Hilary Koprowski, have settled a bitter dispute that has racked the Philadelphia biomedical institution for the last two years. Attorneys for both parties refused to discuss details of the settlement, which was announced yesterday morning, minutes before a jury trial was scheduled to begin in U.S. District Court. Wistar officials said that Giovanni Rovera, who replaced Koprowski as director in the spring of 1991, will continue to serve as the institute's top administrator.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Wistar Institute said it has received a $1.5 million grant from the W.W. Smith Charitable Trust of West Conshohocken to endow a professorship in cancer research. Wistar, a medical-research center in University City, said it has been a regular recipient of research grants from the W.W. Smith trust for more than 30 years. The trust, established through the will of William Wykoff Smith, an oil company executive who died in 1976, made $9.8 million in grants in the year ended June 30, 2013, according to its website.
NEWS
June 19, 1992 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge has dismissed Wistar Institute's countersuit against Hilary Koprowski, 75, a controversial scientist who accused the institute of age discrimination and harassment after he was ousted as director last year. Wistar's claims were unrelated to Koprowski's allegations that age discrimination and "personal animosity led to his removal," after 34 years as director of the nation's oldest independent biomedical research center, U.S. District Judge Clarence Newcomer ruled.
NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Madeline R. Conway, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert A. Roosa, 90, of Wayne, a retired microbiologist who supported scientists as a research institute administrator, died Friday, June 19, of a hemorrhage after falling. Dr. Roosa, who earned his Ph.D. in medical microbiology from the University of Pennsylvania in 1957, spent a long career at the Wistar Institute in University City, a biomedical research institution. He joined the organization in 1960 as a researcher, working in a lab, and later went on to oversee several facilities as a science administrator.
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NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
In the biggest effort yet to find a cure for HIV, the National Institutes of Health on Wednesday named six large scientific teams, one led by Philadelphia's Wistar Institute and the University of Pennsylvania, to tackle different parts of the challenge. The government will commit $30 million a year for five years to the project. The Philadelphia collaboration will get $4.6 million a year. For years, with the world focused on getting treatment to millions of infected people and preventing further spread of the disease, the notion of a "cure seemed naive and overambitious," said Luis J. Montaner, the director of an HIV laboratory at Wistar, who will share leadership of the Philadelphia team.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2016 | Mike Zebe, Staff
Whitney S. Kellett has been hired as chief information officer at the Bryn Mawr-based water utility Aqua America Inc. She spent the last four years as vice president of information technology at Atlas Energy Group L.L.C. Univest Bank & Trust Co., Souderton, has hired Jane Sobieski as senior vice president in its commercial banking area. She had been a senior relationship manager for Bank of America. Tabula Rasa HealthCare Inc., a Moorestown firm that operates the drug-software maker CareKinesis, among other brands, has hired Kristen Propp as creative director.
NEWS
April 30, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
The Wistar Institute in University City will collaborate with a Swedish biopharmaceutical company, with the goal of developing new cancer therapies. The partnership with Cormorant Pharmaceuticals AB, of Stockholm, will pair Wistar's methods for analyzing tumor biopsies with Cormorant's experimental drug HuMax-IL8, which is in early-stage testing in patients at the National Cancer Institute. Wistar scientist Dmitry I. Gabrilovich and colleagues have developed a new biomarker based on understanding how myeloid suppressor cells play a major role in the regulation of immune responses.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2015
'Herding cats," is how Dario C. Altieri describes his job leading the brainy scientists who form the heart of the workforce at Wistar Institute in West Philadelphia. "It's built into the job - a strong sense of independence," said Altieri, 57, in his melodic Italian accent, which he undersells as "straight out of the Bronx or South Philly. " In March, Altieri moved from herded to herder, promoted from the Institute's chief scientific officer and Wistar Cancer Center director, to chief executive and president, succeeding Russel Kaufman, who led Wistar for 12 years.
NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Madeline R. Conway, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert A. Roosa, 90, of Wayne, a retired microbiologist who supported scientists as a research institute administrator, died Friday, June 19, of a hemorrhage after falling. Dr. Roosa, who earned his Ph.D. in medical microbiology from the University of Pennsylvania in 1957, spent a long career at the Wistar Institute in University City, a biomedical research institution. He joined the organization in 1960 as a researcher, working in a lab, and later went on to oversee several facilities as a science administrator.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Caleb Cresson Wistar III, 93, of Lafayette Hill, a Unisys Corp. procurement specialist and a descendant of the Wistar Institute's founders, died in his sleep Thursday, April 2, of causes related to aging at the Hill at Whitemarsh. The family is descended from Caspar Wistar, a Philadelphian who in 1808 became chair of the department of anatomy at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Caspar Wistar's great-nephew Isaac Jones Wistar was a prominent Philadelphia lawyer and Civil War brigadier general.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fresh off the construction of its gleaming, $100 million building expansion in University City, the Wistar Institute announced Thursday that it had appointed a new leader from within. Russel E. Kaufman, chief executive officer of the independent research institute since 2002, is stepping down in March to be succeeded by cancer biologist Dario C. Altieri. Altieri, 56, who left the University of Massachusetts in 2010 to head Wistar's cancer center and serve as the institute's first chief scientific officer, said that among his goals was the continued recruitment of top-notch faculty.
NEWS
January 17, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
DRIVING a famous Army general gave James Edward Starnes a chance to make a new friend. As a driver for the Wistar Institute in University City, James was the person who greeted visitors to the world-renowned research institution at the airport or train station. One day it was Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf Jr., the late commander of forces in the Gulf War and a Vietnam War combat hero. "Did he chat with the general?" his wife, the former Catherine Baylor, was asked. "Oh, yes," she said.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Wistar Institute said it has received a $1.5 million grant from the W.W. Smith Charitable Trust of West Conshohocken to endow a professorship in cancer research. Wistar, a medical-research center in University City, said it has been a regular recipient of research grants from the W.W. Smith trust for more than 30 years. The trust, established through the will of William Wykoff Smith, an oil company executive who died in 1976, made $9.8 million in grants in the year ended June 30, 2013, according to its website.
NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hilary Koprowski, a virologist and former director of the Wistar Institute who developed the first polio vaccine and helped improve the rabies vaccine for humans, has died. Koprowski, who was 96 and had been in declining health in recent months, died Thursday of pneumonia at his home in Wynnewood, according to his son Christopher Koprowski, chief of radiation oncology at the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center at the Christiana Care Health System. "Hilary Koprowski left an enduring mark on medical science and the health of humankind, and his many accomplishments serve as a testament to his legacy," said Russel E. Kaufman, president and chief executive officer of the Wistar Institute.
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