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Withdrawal

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NEWS
May 27, 2000
Life, it is said, is what happens while you are making plans. Israel's withdrawal from Lebanon was not supposed to be like this. Yet the idea of an "orderly unilateral withdrawal" always seemed a contradiction in terms, like a controlled free fall. The unsettling pictures of fleeing Lebanese and rejoicing hezbollah forces, however, do not change Israel's fundamental objectives, nor the chances of achieving them. Those objectives are straightforward: to leave Lebanon, restore security to the northern border, and safeguard the lives of our South Lebanese Army allies.
NEWS
September 28, 2007
WHEN PUSH CAME to shove on Wednesday night at the Democratic presidential debate in New Hampshire, none of the major candidates would guarantee that combat troops would be out of Iraq by the end of their first term. Oh, by the way, that would be in the year 2013. Asked if they would guarantee the removal of troops, here were the replies: "I think it's hard to project four years from now," said Sen. Barack Obama. "It is very difficult to know what we're going to be inheriting," replied Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton.
NEWS
November 16, 2006 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Fresh from a decisive election victory in which voter disaffection over Iraq played a pivotal role, Sen. Robert Menendez (D., N.J.) has returned to Washington, where he has already begun to pressure the Bush administration for troop withdrawals. Menendez, who was named to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, said he planned to make the war his top issue and would use his role on the committee to highlight what he believes is the administration's failed approach. He said he expected the committee, which Democrats will control when the new Congress takes office in January, to grill Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, national security adviser Stephen J. Hadley, and other senior administration officials at public hearings.
NEWS
January 29, 1986 | By Ken Fireman, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Reagan administration wants U.S. companies operating in Angola to think about withdrawing because their operations there are subsidizing a pro-Soviet government and might be blocking U.S. efforts to settle the 10-year-old Angolan civil war, the administration's point man on southern Africa indicated yesterday. Assistant Secretary of State Chester Crocker stopped short of flatly asking the companies to withdraw from Angola. But he said the administration has "asked them to think" about their presence there.
SPORTS
January 22, 1986 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer (Staff writer Joe Juliano contributed to this article)
The U.S. Pro Indoor Tennis Championships, which John McEnroe has turned into his personal showcase in recent years, will be without the four-time defending champion when play begins Monday. McEnroe, the world's second-ranked player, withdrew yesterday from the tournament. At the same time, the Men's International Professional Tennis Council (MIPTC) granted McEnroe's request for a reduction in the number of designated tournaments he must play this year. "He feels that he's got some nagging injury problems," said John McEnroe Sr., who notified tournament officials of his son's withdrawal.
NEWS
May 29, 2003 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The concept of the "do-over" may work in playground sports, but not in city elections, a Common Pleas Court judge ruled yesterday. President Judge Frederica Massiah-Jackson said that Anthony Clark could not undo his withdrawal from last week's Democratic primary for city commissioner because the law requires evidence that he was coerced or duped into making his initial decision. "There is not even a minimum threshold met," Massiah-Jackson said. Clark withdrew from the race the night before polls opened on May 20. After he won, Clark argued that he didn't know what he was doing when he signed papers asking to be removed from the ballot.
NEWS
June 8, 2009 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is well-known that withdrawal doesn't really work. At least, that's the consensus from sex educators and locker-room sages. But now, four reproductive health researchers contend that the withdrawal method, commonly known as pulling out or, more delicately, coitus interruptus, has gotten a bad rap. They cite evidence indicating withdrawal is almost as reliable as condoms over the course of a year. And while interrupting intercourse before ejaculation has obvious drawbacks, it's a reasonable strategy for monogamous couples who aren't worried about venereal diseases and have difficulty with other methods.
NEWS
April 27, 2007 | By Steve Goldstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Pennsylvania Republican Sen. Arlen Specter voted with his party yesterday and against an Iraq spending measure that sets a timetable for withdrawing U.S. forces. "Congress may ultimately have to use its power of the purse to establish an orderly withdrawal from Iraq," Specter said after the vote, "but this bill inappropriately micromanages the war and tells the enemy the date when they can win just by waiting us out. " Specter's vote is consistent with earlier statements he made that it is "impractical and of questionable legal authority" to set withdrawal dates if the consequences would be to guide the enemy's planning.
NEWS
September 27, 1990 | By Robert J. Terry and Ginny Wiegand, Inquirer Staff Writers
It's shortly after 9:15 a.m. yesterday at the Mellon Bank at Broad Street and Erie Avenue in North Philadelphia when a man waiting in line hands a withdrawal slip to a teller. Some withdrawal. Written on the slip, in black ink, are the words: "I have a gun. Give me $1,000. " As police would later recount, the teller looks blankly at the man, who shows no sign of being armed. She says nothing and does nothing. As the bank's security camera records the incident, the would-be bank robber turns away - empty-handed - and walks calmly out the door.
NEWS
August 11, 1988 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Special to The Inquirer Inquirer correspondent Deborah Snyder contributed to this report
Negotiations are continuing between attorneys for the Melmark Home and a neighbor of the Newtown Township home for the mentally retarded to put an end to a 20-month controversy over Melmark's plans to expand its facility. The issue was discussed at a July 21 meeting of the township Zoning Hearing Board when the board voted 4-0 to approve the withdrawal of an appeal of a Board of Supervisors decision. The appeal was filed by David Rawson, who lives across the street from Melmark.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Resolving questions about when a criminal defendant may withdraw a guilty plea, Pennsylvania's Supreme Court has unanimously reinstated the 30- to 66-year prison term of a Kensington man who admitted raping an 11-year-old girl. The high court ruled, 5-0, on Monday, reversing a Superior Court decision in 2013 that Jose Carrasquillo should be tried because the trial judge wrongly rejected his request to withdraw his guilty plea. "A defendant's innocence claim must be at least plausible to demonstrate, in and of itself, a fair and just reason for presentence withdrawal of a plea," wrote Chief Justice Thomas G. Saylor.
NEWS
June 17, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Following months of controversy, Gov. Wolf's embattled choice to lead the Pennsylvania State Police on Monday withdrew his name from consideration. Acting State Police Commissioner Marcus Brown's decision was announced in a statement from the governor's office. In it, Brown did not state a reason for the decision. But Wolf cited politics. "Marcus Brown is the type of leader that Pennsylvania would be lucky to have," the governor said in the statement. "Despite Marcus' vast and unquestioned qualifications, the Senate wrongfully rejected his nomination in a move that put politics above the best interests of the people of Pennsylvania, and it is now appropriate to select a new nominee to lead the Pennsylvania State Police.
NEWS
May 13, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lawyers for Eric Frein, the alleged killer of a Pennsylvania state trooper, have withdrawn, for now, their request to move his death-penalty trial out of Pike County. But defense attorney Michael Weinstein said he would make another attempt later. Another request filed this month still stands. Weinstein asked a judge to order District Attorney Ray Tonkin to stop distributing campaign materials with Frein's name and photo. Tonkin is facing a challenger in the May 19 Republican primary.
SPORTS
April 26, 2015 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Eagles rescinded their restricted free agent tender to running back Chris Polk on Friday, according to a source close to the situation. The move allows the three-year veteran to sign with any other club and ends his Eagles career. The team had tendered Polk at $1.54 million, which did not come with compensation if he signed elsewhere. He could have signed with another team up until Friday, but the Eagles would have had the chance to match. By withdrawing the tender, the team will not need to pay their No. 4 running back that type of salary.
NEWS
March 25, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - The union representing state troopers said Monday that it had no confidence in Gov. Wolf's choice to lead the Pennsylvania State Police, ramping up the pressure on the governor to withdraw the nomination. The Pennsylvania State Troopers Association had stayed neutral on Wolf's embattled pick to run the agency. But following the latest flap involving acting Commissioner Marcus Brown - his being captured on video removing road signs that were critical of him - the union's board cast a vote of no confidence, and asked Wolf to recall the nomination.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Retirees! The deadline for withdrawing your required minimum distribution is right around the corner: April 1. Taxpayers who turned 70½ during 2014 must withdraw money - a lump sum known as a required minimum distribution (RMD) - out of individual or workplace retirement plans. The April 1 deadline applies to 401(k), 403(b), and 457 retirement plans, but not to Roth IRAs. There are exceptions, so check with an accountant. Ask your broker to calculate the RMD dollar amount, or check your year-end 2014 statement.
NEWS
February 25, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - A Centre County judge tapped by Gov. Wolf to fill a state Supreme Court vacancy is withdrawing his nomination after coming under fire last week for an e-mail that some claimed was racially insensitive. Judge Thomas K. Kistler, the president judge in Centre County since 2012, confirmed Monday he is removing his name from consideration. In a statement, Kistler made no mention of the e-mail or the furor surrounding it. Instead, he said that "several circumstances have developed here, at home, in Centre County, which have dramatically altered the legal system and require my full attention.
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA & WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writers gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
SAY THIS MUCH for Ken Trujillo: He provided a mostly underwhelming mayoral race with a genuine holy-crap moment. The moment came yesterday afternoon when Trujillo, a former city solicitor, unexpectedly announced that he was dropping out of the race because of concerns about his extended family in New Mexico. The news came as a genuine surprise to Trujillo's supporters and his opponents, and gave Democrats who have been kinda-sorta toying around with the idea of running for mayor - like City Councilman Jim Kenney and City Controller Alan Butkovitz - something to think about.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Developer Bart Blatstein said Monday that he is withdrawing his appeal of the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board's decision in November to license a rival casino application in South Philadelphia, saying an appeal could take too long and there has been "significant" interest in his North Broad Street property. The gaming board rejected Blatstein's proposed Provence casino complex at Broad and Callowhill Streets, the former location of The Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News, and two other casino proposals, Market8 and Casino Revolution.
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