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NEWS
February 7, 1986 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
If you love rock 'n' roll, and love the notion of a rock 'n' roll museum's being located in Philadelphia, now's the season to show it - with a card, a call, a petition or your presence. Capitalizing on the Valentine-giving season, city officials joined yesterday with local music and corporate executives to announce a "Philadelphia Loves Rock 'n' Roll" Valentine campaign. It's designed to impress members of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation with a flood of red-letter mail when they visit here next Thursday (just 24 hours before Valentine's Day)
NEWS
October 17, 1988 | By Dan Geringer, Daily News Staff Writer
The morning guys . . . They are the aristocrats of the a.m. airwaves, the dukes of the dial, the kings of rock 'n' droll radio. The morning guys. They are considered the key to how well a station does for the rest of the day. They get the big bucks for the big yuks. They shock, they shlock, they shtick it to anything that breathes or has recently stopped breathing. The longtime ruler of the early risers is John DeBella, whose album rock WMMR (FM/93.3) Morning Zoo has been the top-rated a.m. show in Philadelphia for more than 3 1/2 years.
NEWS
October 5, 1987 | By DAVE BITTAN, Daily News Staff Writer
Listen closely to episodes of radio's "The Great Gildersleeve" on WCAU- AM's "Radio Classics," and you might hear the voice of a young Betty White. The show biz career of the bubbly star of TV's "The Golden Girls" goes back that far. Tonight at 11 on WIP (AM/610), White talks with Larry King about her 40 or so years on stage, screen, radio and TV. And she may talk about elephants - her favorite animal - or pigs. Her pet porker on her current show has just gone to that great pigpen in the sky. White is a member of the Greater Los Angeles Zoo Assn.
NEWS
April 18, 1988 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
A year ago this Wednesday, Harvey, of Harvey-in-the-Morning semi-fame, hitched up his pants and groped around in the dark of his back hall closet until he found what was left of his ego and self-confidence, and he went back to work in radio. WIOQ-FM (102.1), where he worked for more than a decade, until he got canned when the station's ratings started to slip, was history. It was a brand-new day, this time at adult-contemporary WMGK-FM (102.9). His anniversary as Magic's 6-to-9-a.
NEWS
August 7, 2009 | By Max Stendahl INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul Green, founder of the original School of Rock a decade ago, is used to being imitated. First it was comedian Jack Black, who seemed to play Philadelphia's Green - a quirky and irreverent guitar instructor - in the 2003 film. Then it was the emergence of a national market for kids' rock schools. Now Green is getting more competition in his backyard. Erin Riley, the '80s-era WMMR music director, has opened the Rock and Roll After School in Phoenixville, making her a rare regional challenger to Green's now coast-to-coast empire.
NEWS
June 12, 1989 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Mason back on the radio? OK, so there have been a couple of earlier false alarms about the scrappy Philadelphia radio veteran, but consider this: After months of rumors, Cody Anderson, former general manager of WDAS-AM/ FM, has finally purchased WHAT-AM (1340). The price: $1.65 million. The plan: a black-oriented talk format. "Mary and I have not officially talked yet," Anderson said Friday, "but if you talk about black-oriented talk, you have to consider Mary. At some point, I'll probably talk to her. " Mason, once queen of black talk radio in Philadelphia, and Anderson, once king of 'DAS, have never been kindred spirits.
NEWS
February 20, 2011 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
The Walnut Street Theatre is going for baroque, as its main-stage mounting of Amadeus has broken the 202-year-old theater's box-office record for a straight play (nonmusical). Its $341,109 in ticket sales sent Amadeus past the 2008-09 production of Tennessee Williams ' A Streetcar Named Desire ($314,840). Add to that the theater's 50,000-plus subscribers. The Walnut added a March 6 performance of the Peter Shaffer -written Tony winner, which presents the tortured relationship between composers Antonio Salieri and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart . Media notes Heather Marter , 22, a 2007 grad of Delran High and a broadcast journalism major at Monmouth University, is in the cast of Real World: Las Vegas , which will premiere March 9 at 10 p.m. on MTV. The Dennis & Michele midday show on WKXW (New Jersey 101.5)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1989 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
WUSL and WEGX have "Batman. " WYSP has "Great Balls of Fire. " WMMR has "Ghostbusters. " WMGK had "Cousins. " More movies than ever are turning up on the radio, and not only in the form of theme music. In this summer of "Batman," "Ghostbusters II," "Star Trek V" and "Indiana Jones III," stations are competing fiercely to promote the movies themselves with free sneak previews and album giveaways. "I can't remember any year being so competitive with the radio stations wanting these films," said one movie publicist who, like Batman, prefers anonymity.
NEWS
April 16, 2009 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
'WE LOST our voice. " What fitting words for Phillies President David Montgomery to use to express the significance of the passing of Harry Kalas. Whether singing "High Hopes" or declaring a Mike Schmidt home run "outta here," Harry had a gift. He was our voice and we will miss him. But when it comes to giving good voice, Philadelphians are lucky. Not every sports town can boast of a legend like Harry the K or a voice like John Facenda. In fact, many sports fans, news junkies and music lovers never find that specific broadcaster, news anchor or deejay to put up on a pedestal.
NEWS
March 19, 2005 | By JUSTIN McANENY
NEIL YOUNG SANG, "Rock and roll must never die. " Well, Neil, in Philadelphia, it is. On Feb. 25, Philadelphia's only modern-rock radio station, Y100, ended an 11-year career. They ended with a fitting song, Pearl Jam's "Alive. " The ending chorus goes, "Oh, I'm, oh, I'm still alive. " And that's what Y100 wanted - to stay alive. The Y100 switch launched a campaign to keep rock in Philadelphia. According to the Web site dedicated to saving Y100 (Y100rocks.com), as of March 1, more than 40,000 people had signed their petition.
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