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NEWS
February 14, 2016
The headline "School leaders angered by Wolf" (Wednesday) following the governor's unveiling of his 2016-17 budget was misleading. Wolf was elected with the help of educators and parents across the commonwealth with a clear mandate: Reverse the damage done to public education by former Gov. Tom Corbett and the Republican-led General Assembly. Lesser politicians would have used Republican obstructionism as an excuse to give up on that goal. By sticking to his principles and maintaining his promise to voters, he is showing leadership.
SPORTS
March 20, 2003 | By Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Randy Wolf finished running early yesterday morning, he sat down behind the bullpen at Jack Russell Stadium and acknowledged both his disgust and his concern. Wolf knows that the season is fast approaching and that he wasn't even close to being on top of his game when the Cincinnati Reds torched him for six first-inning runs Wednesday. "To go out there and throw 40 pitches in the first inning, it's just embarrassing," Wolf said. The objective for Wolf is obvious: Correct the problem.
SPORTS
December 11, 2007 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Former Phillie Randy Wolf will get a nice payday if he can make 30 starts and pitch 200 innings for the San Diego Padres. The lefthander finalized a one-year deal with the Padres yesterday that will top out at $9 million if he attains all his incentives. He will make $4.75 million in base pay. Wolf was 9-6 with a 4.23 ERA in 18 starts with the Los Angeles Dodgers this year. He did not pitch after July 3 because of soreness in his left shoulder. He had surgery in September.
NEWS
February 11, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
$33.3B Total spending proposed for the 2016-17 fiscal year. $2.7B Amount that would be generated by new or increased taxes. $217M Revenue that would be generated from a tax on natural gas drilling. $200M New funding for public schools. $60M New spending sought for early childhood education. $50M Funding increase proposed for special education. $10.15 Proposal for Pennsylvania minimum wage. Note: Figures based on passage of current budget proposal.
NEWS
March 4, 2015
IN PRACTICAL terms, Gov. Tom Wolf's removal of Bill Green as chair of the School Reform Commission, to be replaced by Marjorie "Marge" Neff, shouldn't have much immediate impact on Philadelphia schools. From all accounts, the all-volunteer SRC seems to have accomplished the not-easy feat of working as a unified body, shepherding the District through the rocky shoals of financial and political upheaval. It does seem likely that Gov. Wolf was intent on sending a message with the move.
NEWS
May 1, 2015
TOM WOLF is now in office 100 days, just a mini-milestone to be sure, but enough to suggest what to expect from the business guy turned governor. I sat with Wolf this week in Harrisburg, in the ornate reception room outside his office. He was, as usual, soft-spoken, direct, focused on broad themes; pushing his agenda despite significant resistance from the Republican-controlled Legislature. His biggest surprise so far? "I'm actually enjoying this job," he says, especially getting around the state and meeting with "real people.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1995 | By Miriam Seidel, FOR THE INQUIRER
When Hellmut Gottschild turned to a solo career three years ago, after decades of leading the ZeroMoving Dance Company and teaching, it must have felt like a tremendous risk. But his performances since then have justified that risk, affording audiences the rare and revelatory sight of an older dancer renewing himself artistically. His program at the Painted Bride this weekend highlights two extended works, one pure dance and the other the ambitious Meet Mr. R., a theater/dance meditation on the legend of Romulus and Remus, first seen in 1993.
NEWS
May 20, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Gov. Wolf on Wednesday upheld his promise to veto a bill that would lessen the role of seniority in teacher layoffs. The Protecting Excellent Teachers Act, passed this month by the House and Senate, had become a political football. This week, a key Republican in the legislature warned the governor that the issue could resurface in next month's budget negotiations if he vetoed the bill. Supporters, including the state School Boards Association, said the measure would let districts protect their best teachers by using performance ratings, not seniority, in determining layoffs.
NEWS
December 19, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - A day after House Republicans told Gov. Wolf he had 24 hours to recruit enough votes to pass a long-overdue state budget, their deadline came and went. And nothing happened. A spokesman for Wolf dismissed the deadline as "ridiculous. " Speaker Mike Turzai, who had set the 12:30 p.m. Thursday deadline, declined to say what the fallout might be. But the silence and inaction - tantamount to business as usual in the five-month budget stalemate - raised questions about lawmakers' optimism this week that a final plan could be approved by the weekend.
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis and Laura McCrystal, STAFF WRITERS
HARRISBURG - Gov. Wolf will undergo treatment for what he called a "mild" and treatable form of prostate cancer, but said it would not interfere with his job. In disclosing the illness Wednesday, Wolf, 67, did not offer details about his diagnosis or the treatment he expects in coming months. He said only that it would not require him to step aside, even temporarily. "It really was detected very early. So the procedure is going to be a truly minor one," the governor said at a Capitol news briefing, accompanied only by his wife, Frances.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 15, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Gov. Wolf's office and the state Republican Party faced off in Commonwealth Court on Tuesday over a request to release emails of Katie McGinty, the governor's former chief of staff who is now the Democratic nominee for U.S. Senate. The governor's office is appealing a state Office of Open Records determination that it turn over some materials it withheld in response to a July 2015 right-to-know request from the deputy communications director of the state Republican Party.
NEWS
September 13, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Gov. Wolf will join Aramark officials to make a "major announcement" Monday, sparking speculation that the global food-services giant has decided on a new Center City headquarters location. Wolf's office said the news conference would be held at 1:30 p.m. at Cira Green on 30th Street, which happens to have a perfect view across the Schuylkill of 2400 Market St., a location the company has been considering. Aramark currently occupies about 365,000 square feet of space in its namesake tower at 1101 Market St. With the lease there expiring in 2018, the company had been weighing the possibility of moving its headquarters - including to another city.
NEWS
September 12, 2016
Tom Wolf is governor of Pennsylvania With a brand-new school year underway for the vast majority of Pennsylvania students, it's important to recognize that the way the commonwealth funds its schools has changed significantly - and for the better. In June, I signed Act 35 into law. It established a fair funding formula for the commonwealth's 500 school districts, and allocates funds in two ways: Schools first receive the same amount received in the previous year, then additional funding is distributed via student-specific factors.
NEWS
September 11, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - William Trout Wolf, 95, Gov. Wolf's father, died Friday afternoon, the governor's office announced. Mr. Wolf, who owned the York-based kitchen cabinet company that the Democratic governor and two business partners later bought, died at 3:15, the governor's office said. Funeral arrangements are pending. "In the meantime, we ask that the family's privacy be respected during this difficult time," said Wolf spokesman Jeff Sheridan. Last year, Mr. Wolf, a longtime business leader and philanthropist in York County, suffered a heart attack, the governor had said.
NEWS
September 11, 2016
The Kingdom of Speech By Tom Wolfe Little, Brown. 185 pp. $26 Reviewed by Frank Wilson According to a 2004 article in Frontiers of Psychology titled "The Mystery of Language Evolution," "the most fundamental questions about the origins and evolution of our linguistic capacity remain as mysterious as ever. " Among the article's eight authors - as Tom Wolfe notes in his new book, The Kingdom of Speech - was Noam Chomsky, "the biggest name in linguistic history.
NEWS
September 3, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis, HARRISBURG BUREAU
MECHANICSBURG, Pa. - Gov. Wolf chose three Pennsylvania wines and a six-pack of beer, and paid in cash. Not far behind him in line was House Speaker Mike Turzai (R., Allegheny), who picked up a bottle of white. The two are usually on opposite sides of the political debate, but on Thursday, they had a meeting of the minds on making booze more accessible to consumers, hoisting flutes of champagne to toast the first bottle of wine sold at a Wegmans store in Pennsylvania. "Here in Pennsylvania, that is a really, really big deal," Wolf told the politicians, businesspeople, shoppers, and gawkers gathered at the supermarket in a Harrisburg suburb.
NEWS
August 20, 2016 | By Craig R. McCoy and Angela Couloumbis, STAFF WRITERS
HARRISBURG - Gov. Wolf on Thursday nominated a former top state prosecutor to serve as attorney general and replace the convicted Kathleen G. Kane, a move that would end the fleeting tenure of Bruce L. Castor Jr. Wolf said his nominee, Bruce Beemer, a Democrat, had the support of Republican and Democratic legislative leaders. Beemer's nomination must be confirmed by the GOP-controlled Senate, a vote that is not expected before the end of the month. "Bruce Beemer has a depth of experience," Wolf said in a statement.
NEWS
August 17, 2016 | By Grace Toohey, Staff Writer
The greatest danger to Pennsylvanians is less likely to come from terrorists plotting attacks halfway around the world than from a homegrown extremist in their own backyard, the state's homeland security chief said Monday. "The 'lone wolf' doesn't need ISIS," Homeland Security Director Marcus Brown said at a terrorism awareness and response symposium in King of Prussia. "They're much less pushing the organized attack from ISIS to the United States, they're saying, 'Go do something, don't wait for us to tell you.' " Brown was among more than 600 law enforcement personnel gathered at the Valley Forge Sheraton for the daylong conference put on by the state.
NEWS
August 12, 2016 | By Daniel Block, Staff Writer
Saying Pennsylvania is facing a "public health crisis," Gov. Wolf on Wednesday said he hoped the state could find ways to add to the $20 million that the legislature has appropriated for 20 special facilities for the treatment of people addicted to opioids. Appearing in Norristown outside the Montgomery County Methadone Center, recently named one of 20 "Centers of Excellence," Wolf and Human Services Secretary Ted Dallas said they hoped the initiative would reduce addiction in communities such as Norristown, where drug violations occur at nearly double the Montgomery County rate, according to state figures.
NEWS
August 12, 2016
B UZZ: Hey Marnie, my cousin says he can't drink red wine because it gives him a headache. Is that because red wines have more sulfites? Marnie: No, Buzz. That's an urban legend. Very few people have a sensitivity to sulfites, but among those who do, the symptoms are invariably respiratory - often trouble breathing. The most common negative reactions to wine, such as headaches, hangovers, and flushing, are not sulfite reactions. But as "contains sulfites" is the most visible health warning on wine labels, many people assume SO2 is to blame.
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