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NEWS
February 14, 2016
The headline "School leaders angered by Wolf" (Wednesday) following the governor's unveiling of his 2016-17 budget was misleading. Wolf was elected with the help of educators and parents across the commonwealth with a clear mandate: Reverse the damage done to public education by former Gov. Tom Corbett and the Republican-led General Assembly. Lesser politicians would have used Republican obstructionism as an excuse to give up on that goal. By sticking to his principles and maintaining his promise to voters, he is showing leadership.
SPORTS
March 20, 2003 | By Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Randy Wolf finished running early yesterday morning, he sat down behind the bullpen at Jack Russell Stadium and acknowledged both his disgust and his concern. Wolf knows that the season is fast approaching and that he wasn't even close to being on top of his game when the Cincinnati Reds torched him for six first-inning runs Wednesday. "To go out there and throw 40 pitches in the first inning, it's just embarrassing," Wolf said. The objective for Wolf is obvious: Correct the problem.
SPORTS
December 11, 2007 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Former Phillie Randy Wolf will get a nice payday if he can make 30 starts and pitch 200 innings for the San Diego Padres. The lefthander finalized a one-year deal with the Padres yesterday that will top out at $9 million if he attains all his incentives. He will make $4.75 million in base pay. Wolf was 9-6 with a 4.23 ERA in 18 starts with the Los Angeles Dodgers this year. He did not pitch after July 3 because of soreness in his left shoulder. He had surgery in September.
NEWS
February 11, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
$33.3B Total spending proposed for the 2016-17 fiscal year. $2.7B Amount that would be generated by new or increased taxes. $217M Revenue that would be generated from a tax on natural gas drilling. $200M New funding for public schools. $60M New spending sought for early childhood education. $50M Funding increase proposed for special education. $10.15 Proposal for Pennsylvania minimum wage. Note: Figures based on passage of current budget proposal.
NEWS
August 14, 2015 | By Jessica Parks and Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - During an hour-long negotiating session Wednesday, Gov. Wolf and Republican legislators inched toward compromise on some key sticking points in a budget six weeks overdue. House Speaker Mike Turzai (R., Allegheny) was careful to temper expectations, but said the talks marked the first time he had seen "some movement [by Wolf] acknowledging our perspective" on pension reform and privatization of the state liquor store system. "There's no breakthrough," Turzai said, "but it was an important discussion.
NEWS
August 7, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
Gov. Wolf came to Philadelphia on Friday to tout a $20 million state program to coordinate treatment for people addicted to opioids. "This is a disease we need to get our arms around," Wolf said at Thomas Jefferson University. "We're losing people every day. " Wolf said 2,500 deaths in Pennsylvania were attributed to opioid overdoses last year, more than twice the 1,200 killed in traffic accidents. The funding, though modestly spread across the state, is a good start, he said.
NEWS
March 4, 2015
IN PRACTICAL terms, Gov. Tom Wolf's removal of Bill Green as chair of the School Reform Commission, to be replaced by Marjorie "Marge" Neff, shouldn't have much immediate impact on Philadelphia schools. From all accounts, the all-volunteer SRC seems to have accomplished the not-easy feat of working as a unified body, shepherding the District through the rocky shoals of financial and political upheaval. It does seem likely that Gov. Wolf was intent on sending a message with the move.
NEWS
May 20, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Gov. Wolf on Wednesday upheld his promise to veto a bill that would lessen the role of seniority in teacher layoffs. The Protecting Excellent Teachers Act, passed this month by the House and Senate, had become a political football. This week, a key Republican in the legislature warned the governor that the issue could resurface in next month's budget negotiations if he vetoed the bill. Supporters, including the state School Boards Association, said the measure would let districts protect their best teachers by using performance ratings, not seniority, in determining layoffs.
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis and Laura McCrystal, STAFF WRITERS
HARRISBURG - Gov. Wolf will undergo treatment for what he called a "mild" and treatable form of prostate cancer, but said it would not interfere with his job. In disclosing the illness Wednesday, Wolf, 67, did not offer details about his diagnosis or the treatment he expects in coming months. He said only that it would not require him to step aside, even temporarily. "It really was detected very early. So the procedure is going to be a truly minor one," the governor said at a Capitol news briefing, accompanied only by his wife, Frances.
NEWS
May 1, 2015
TOM WOLF is now in office 100 days, just a mini-milestone to be sure, but enough to suggest what to expect from the business guy turned governor. I sat with Wolf this week in Harrisburg, in the ornate reception room outside his office. He was, as usual, soft-spoken, direct, focused on broad themes; pushing his agenda despite significant resistance from the Republican-controlled Legislature. His biggest surprise so far? "I'm actually enjoying this job," he says, especially getting around the state and meeting with "real people.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 17, 2016 | By Grace Toohey, Staff Writer
The greatest danger to Pennsylvanians is less likely to come from terrorists plotting attacks halfway around the world than from a homegrown extremist in their own backyard, the state's homeland security chief said Monday. "The 'lone wolf' doesn't need ISIS," Homeland Security Director Marcus Brown said at a terrorism awareness and response symposium in King of Prussia. "They're much less pushing the organized attack from ISIS to the United States, they're saying, 'Go do something, don't wait for us to tell you.' " Brown was among more than 600 law enforcement personnel gathered at the Valley Forge Sheraton for the daylong conference put on by the state.
NEWS
August 12, 2016
B UZZ: Hey Marnie, my cousin says he can't drink red wine because it gives him a headache. Is that because red wines have more sulfites? Marnie: No, Buzz. That's an urban legend. Very few people have a sensitivity to sulfites, but among those who do, the symptoms are invariably respiratory - often trouble breathing. The most common negative reactions to wine, such as headaches, hangovers, and flushing, are not sulfite reactions. But as "contains sulfites" is the most visible health warning on wine labels, many people assume SO2 is to blame.
NEWS
August 12, 2016 | By Daniel Block, Staff Writer
Saying Pennsylvania is facing a "public health crisis," Gov. Wolf on Wednesday said he hoped the state could find ways to add to the $20 million that the legislature has appropriated for 20 special facilities for the treatment of people addicted to opioids. Appearing in Norristown outside the Montgomery County Methadone Center, recently named one of 20 "Centers of Excellence," Wolf and Human Services Secretary Ted Dallas said they hoped the initiative would reduce addiction in communities such as Norristown, where drug violations occur at nearly double the Montgomery County rate, according to state figures.
NEWS
August 7, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
Gov. Wolf came to Philadelphia on Friday to tout a $20 million state program to coordinate treatment for people addicted to opioids. "This is a disease we need to get our arms around," Wolf said at Thomas Jefferson University. "We're losing people every day. " Wolf said 2,500 deaths in Pennsylvania were attributed to opioid overdoses last year, more than twice the 1,200 killed in traffic accidents. The funding, though modestly spread across the state, is a good start, he said.
NEWS
August 4, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Gov. Wolf said Tuesday that state agencies saved more than $156 million in the 2015-16 fiscal year through a cost-cutting initiative. Shortly after taking office in 2015, Wolf directed his cabinet secretaries to find ways for Pennsylvania's government to do its work at a lower cost. He named the office with the responsibility of cost-saving: the Governor's Office of Transformation, Innovation, Management, and Efficiency. "We need to make government run more efficiently," Wolf reiterated at a news conference Tuesday.
NEWS
July 29, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis, STAFF WRITER
On the floor of the Democratic National Convention , Gov. Wolf took the microphone Tuesday and played a small part in writing the history books for the first woman to cinch a major party nomination for president. Breaking into a smile during the delegate roll call, Wolf told the crowd: "I am honored to announce that Pennsylvania awards 126 votes to the next president of the United States, Hillary Clinton. " The question now becomes: Can he help deliver the state for Clinton in November?
NEWS
July 18, 2016
Tom Wolf is governor of Pennsylvania During the 2016-17 budget season, we accomplished three important priorities that I believe are critical to moving Pennsylvania forward. Working with the legislature, I secured increased funding for our schools and resources to battle the commonwealth's opioid epidemic, and greatly reduced our deficit. Funding our schools has always been a top priority for me. In this budget, I was able to secure an additional $200 million in basic education funding, as well as a $30 million increase for early-childhood education; a $20 million increase for special education and a $10 million increase for early intervention; and a nearly $40 million increase for higher education.
NEWS
July 16, 2016 | Staff Report
Gov. Wolf has signed legislation that will allow ride share firms like Uber and Lyft to operate in Philadelphia until at least Sept. 30, his office announced Thursday. In a statement, Wolf called for legislation to make the arrangement permanent. "I have supported the legalization of ride-sharing companies like Uber and Lyft in Philadelphia and throughout Pennsylvania, and I believe we should be finding ways to help these companies grow across the commonwealth," said Wolf, who signed the bill late Wednesday.
NEWS
July 16, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
Pennsylvania will open 20 centers around the state by fall to coordinate care for people addicted to opioids, the Wolf administration announced Thursday. The centers - six of them in Southeastern Pennsylvania - will not be new locations, but instead are existing organizations that will function as navigational hubs to coordinate a range of services for Medicaid patients. By integrating treatment for substance abuse, mental health, and physical health, their mission is to help ensure patients get all the types of care proven to promote recovery.
NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Pennsylvania has an annual budget - nearly nine months sooner than it took last year. The Republican-controlled legislature on Wednesday approved budget bills that use new taxes on tobacco and digital downloads, and changes to gambling and wine sales, to pay for the $31.5 billion spending plan it passed last month. Gov. Wolf pledged to sign them. The swiftness of the deal, reached less than two weeks after the July 1 deadline, stood in contrast to the partisan divide that gridlocked the Capitol and overshadowed much of Wolf's first 18 months in office.
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