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Wolf Pack

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NEWS
May 27, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
SEATTLE - The two primary breeding females from the best-known wolf pack at Denali National Park - a pack viewed by tens of thousands of visitors each year - have been killed, one of them by a trapper operating just outside the boundary of Alaska's premier national park. The incident has raised an outcry among Alaska conservationists. They're demanding an immediate halt to wolf trapping in what was formerly a buffer zone northeast of the park, an area made famous as the scene of the abandoned school bus in Jon Krakauer's Into the Wild . The trapper apparently shot an aging horse and left it as a lure for the wolves, according to residents in the area.
NEWS
July 8, 1989 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The prosecutor called the crime a "wolf pack" assault on two innocent victims in Center City. Common Pleas Judge Ricardo C. Jackson described it as a "senseless, violent attack" that could not be tolerated, and yesterday sentenced Leonard Thompson, 22, of Mole Street near Washington Avenue, to 10 to 20 years in prison. Jackson said he wanted to "send a message" to gangs who terrorize others on city streets. Thompson was found guilty of two charges of robbery, two aggravated assault counts and a charge of conspiracy.
NEWS
June 22, 1989 | By David McClendon, Daily News Staff Writer
Nathan Butcher watched the group of 25 to 30 teen-agers roaming through the crowd of commuters on the subway platform, cursing and threatening people. And heading his way. He thought he knew what they were up to, and decided to conceal the gold chains he was wearing under his shirt. But the wolf pack at the 15th and Market streets SEPTA station Tuesday already had made him its next victim. The group surrounded him. One teen ripped the chains from his neck and, with the pack kicking and punching him, Butcher jumped onto the tracks.
NEWS
February 1, 2011 | By WILLIAM BENDER, benderw@phillynews.com 215-854-5255
THE CELL-PHONE video confiscated by Upper Darby police lasts only seven minutes, but to 13-year-old Nadin Khoury, it was the longest seven minutes of his life. In a Jan. 11 bullying incident that led to six arrests yesterday, teenage boys can be seen dragging Nadin across the snow-covered ground like a deer carcass, then jamming him upside down into a tree. His screams for mercy only emboldened the seven students of Upper Darby High School's Opportunity Center, or "thugs," as Police Superintendent Michael Chitwood called them yesterday as they were being processed on kidnapping and assault charges.
NEWS
June 21, 1989 | By Kurt Heine, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Gina Boubion contributed to this report
A pack of at least 25 teen-agers attacked a subway rider yesterday, but the victim battled and then outran them by fleeing across the Market-Frankford Subway tracks at 15th and Market streets, police said. Police flooded the station concourse with officers and apprehended five juveniles and one adult. All were accused of participating in what Detective Joseph Sweeney called a "wolf pack" attack. The victim, Nathan Butcher, 19, a University of Pennsylvania maintenance worker who lives in West Oak Lane, told police he was walking through the concourse at 12:30 p.m. when he heard a gang of teens yelling "South Philly" or "South Station.
NEWS
August 4, 2009 | By Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Syed Kamal was pistol-whipped and robbed as he walked to his Upper Darby home after work. Dennis Smith was jumped as he tried to pull groceries from his car. Jagjit Singh was thrown to the ground in an attempted robbery as he walked along Market Street. Yesterday, Michael J. Chitwood, Upper Darby's police superintendent, said the three were victims last week of "wolf pack" robberies - assaults by a number of attackers. Over three days, Chitwood said, his department arrested nine juveniles he thinks are responsible for the crimes.
SPORTS
June 23, 1999 | By Sam Carchidi, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pirates 2 Phillies 3 Just a couple of months ago, even the man who shrewdly drafted Randy Wolf in 1997 was being cautious about the promising lefthander. "He's not a power pitcher, and he's not a guy who can make mistakes at the big-league level and get by," Phillies scouting director Mike Arbuckle said in late April when Wolf was dominating the International League. Now it's June, and Wolf is dominating the National League. Wolf, in his third major-league appearance, pitched his third straight gem as the Phillies defeated the Pittsburgh Pirates, 3-2, before a lively announced crowd of 18,835 at Veterans Stadium last night.
NEWS
August 14, 2011 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
Why are you hiding the truth? Why won't you call them hate crimes? Can you imagine the outcry if it were white kids attacking blacks?   That's the thrust, minus racial slurs and profanity, of the response to the latest flash-mob coverage. Readers think we haven't said enough about the galling fact that the perpetrators of these violent attacks are black and the victims, nonblack. (And no, I'm not avoiding white . One innocent was a Cambodian shopkeeper.)
NEWS
May 6, 1995 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
ON THIN ICE, FLOATING MOOSE BECOMES A FLYING MOOSE A young moose was a little bruised and woozy but otherwise OK after a helicopter lift yesterday off a sheet of drifting ice in Conception Bay. The yearling was chased onto the ice by dogs Thursday night. A small floe then broke away and drifted about 150 yards off the shore of the community of Kelligrews near St. John's, Newfoundland. Wildlife officials tranquilized the 400-pound animal, put a harness on it, and lifted it to a wooded area, where it was released.
NEWS
February 3, 2011 | By WILLIAM BENDER, benderw@phillynews.com 215-854-5255
The seven Upper Darby teenagers arrested Monday in a videotaped bullying incident that made national headlines will remain in the Delaware County Juvenile Detention Center for at least another week, a judge ruled yesterday. The boys, ages 13 to 17, have been charged with kidnapping, assault and related offenses in the Jan. 11 attack on 13-year-old Nadin Khoury. They are accused of dragging Khoury across the ground, hoisting him into a tree and hanging him by a 7-foot-high spiked fence post - and recording it on a cell-phone camera.
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NEWS
September 9, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
The wolf pack that has enchanted thousands of visitors at Alaska's Denali National Park did not produce any pups this year, and its members have dispersed widely throughout the park, says a petition seeking to ban hunting and trapping along the park's northeastern boundary, where a female wolf was fatally snared this year. Visitors are likely to have substantially fewer chances to see wolves, which habitually denned close to the main road through the six-million-acre park, says the petition, filed this month by the Alaska Wildlife Alliance, the National Parks Conservation Association, and other groups.
NEWS
May 27, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
SEATTLE - The two primary breeding females from the best-known wolf pack at Denali National Park - a pack viewed by tens of thousands of visitors each year - have been killed, one of them by a trapper operating just outside the boundary of Alaska's premier national park. The incident has raised an outcry among Alaska conservationists. They're demanding an immediate halt to wolf trapping in what was formerly a buffer zone northeast of the park, an area made famous as the scene of the abandoned school bus in Jon Krakauer's Into the Wild . The trapper apparently shot an aging horse and left it as a lure for the wolves, according to residents in the area.
NEWS
August 14, 2011 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
Why are you hiding the truth? Why won't you call them hate crimes? Can you imagine the outcry if it were white kids attacking blacks?   That's the thrust, minus racial slurs and profanity, of the response to the latest flash-mob coverage. Readers think we haven't said enough about the galling fact that the perpetrators of these violent attacks are black and the victims, nonblack. (And no, I'm not avoiding white . One innocent was a Cambodian shopkeeper.)
NEWS
February 3, 2011 | By WILLIAM BENDER, benderw@phillynews.com 215-854-5255
The seven Upper Darby teenagers arrested Monday in a videotaped bullying incident that made national headlines will remain in the Delaware County Juvenile Detention Center for at least another week, a judge ruled yesterday. The boys, ages 13 to 17, have been charged with kidnapping, assault and related offenses in the Jan. 11 attack on 13-year-old Nadin Khoury. They are accused of dragging Khoury across the ground, hoisting him into a tree and hanging him by a 7-foot-high spiked fence post - and recording it on a cell-phone camera.
NEWS
February 1, 2011 | By WILLIAM BENDER, benderw@phillynews.com 215-854-5255
THE CELL-PHONE video confiscated by Upper Darby police lasts only seven minutes, but to 13-year-old Nadin Khoury, it was the longest seven minutes of his life. In a Jan. 11 bullying incident that led to six arrests yesterday, teenage boys can be seen dragging Nadin across the snow-covered ground like a deer carcass, then jamming him upside down into a tree. His screams for mercy only emboldened the seven students of Upper Darby High School's Opportunity Center, or "thugs," as Police Superintendent Michael Chitwood called them yesterday as they were being processed on kidnapping and assault charges.
SPORTS
October 20, 2009 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After Dodgers centerfielder Matt Kemp parked his go-ahead fifth-inning homer past the reach of Shane Victorino into the shrubs short of Ashburn Alley, Patrick Wood didn't hide his disappointment "That was painful," said Wood, looking glum as he stood in the back of Section 126 at Citizens Bank Park. He's a Phillies fan. His brothers are Phillies fans. The whole West Philadelphia brood created the famous Wolf Pack, honoring pitcher Randy Wolf during Wolf's time here. They honored Wolf the Phillie, and he didn't ask any of them to change their allegiance or wear their old Wolf masks for his start last night, even though the Dodgers pitcher got them primo tickets for last night's game and Wolf even got a ride to the ballpark Monday from Wood's brother, John.
SPORTS
October 20, 2009 | By MARCUS HAYES, hayesm@phillynews.com
NOT BAD for Plan D. Precise, if not perfect, Randy Wolf returned to Philadelphia and made his strongest supporters Dodger blue. A strong contingent of the once-mighty Wolf Pack attended last night's Game 4 of the National League Championship Series. A half-dozen of them came, four as guests of Wolf, their favorite Phillie during his tenure from 1999-2006. Rachel, 10, daughter of John, one of the eight Wood brothers who founded the Pack and spawned copycat fan groups, overcame a 101-degree noontime fever and braved temperatures in the 40s. Like her dad and uncles, she hoped to see Wolf pitch well.
SPORTS
October 19, 2009 | By MARCUS HAYES, hayesm@phillynews.com
There will be six wolves - er, Wolfs? - at the Bank tonight. Actually, five wolves and one lucky pup. But they won't be a Wolf Pack. Not tonight. The Wood family, creators and performers of the Wolf Pack, will have six seats at Game 4 of the National League Championship Series tonight at Citizens Bank Park. They will watch Randy Wolf, once their favorite Phillie, start - only he'll be pitching for the enemy, the Los Angeles Dodgers. So, no Wolf Pack banner; no rubber wolf masks; no ch ainsaw Strike 3 mimes; none of the antics, wardrobe and props that made them an entertaining fixture for Wolf's home outings as a Phillie from 1999-2006.
SPORTS
October 15, 2009 | By DAN GERINGER, geringd@phillynews.com
A decade ago they sat in a sea of empty 700-level seats at Veterans Stadium, wearing wolf masks, dancing and howling whenever Randy Wolf was on the mound. When Wolf pitched the first game at Citizens Bank Park in 2004, there was the Wolf Pack - eight Wood brothers: Kevin, Joe, John, Al, Jimmy, Charles, Tom and Patrick, along with first cousins Tommy, John, Mark and Jimmy Thompson. But after the 2006 season, Wolf became a Dodger, and he returned to LA this season after stints with the Padres and Astros last year.
NEWS
September 20, 2009 | By Pam Mitchell FOR THE INQUIRER
Sometimes in life, you need to take an action that makes a statement, not for the rest of the world, but just for yourself. That's what I did in the fall of 2007, when I journeyed to Yellowstone to visit the wolves. September is a crucial time for teachers, and, having retired after 37 years of teaching, I knew I would be feeling the pull of the classroom when autumn arrived. So I decided instead to spend my September days in one of America's most stunning settings, Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming.
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