CollectionsWomb
IN THE NEWS

Womb

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 1, 2013
Exposure to tobacco smoke while in the womb can lead to diminished hearing by adolescence, doctors have found in the first study ever to link tobacco use and hearing impairment. The new research by Michael Weitzman and Anil Lalwani of the NYU-Langone School of Medicine suggests compounds in tobacco smoke cross the placenta and harm the auditory system. In the past, doctors have linked low birth weight, asthma, sudden infant death syndrome, and recurrent ear infections to both maternal smoking and exposure of the mother to secondhand smoke while pregnant.
NEWS
April 25, 1986 | By Ellen Goodman
In a few years, you can bet on it. Baby Girl Who is going to turn to her parents and ask, "Where did I come from?" This question won't bring on the normal, scaled-down, blushing nursery lecture about sex. Oh, what a different tale these parents have to tell. Baby Girl Who (as in "Who" does this baby belong to?) was conceived last August. The egg and sperm of a couple from New York got together in a petri dish in Cleveland. What came from this union was an embryo. The embryo was implanted into the womb of a woman from Detroit.
NEWS
November 15, 1993 | Daily News wire services
SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS STUNT CARS CRASH IN MIDAIR; 1 DEAD Two cars performing an aerial stunt, collided in midair, killing a driver as 16,000 fans, including the stuntman's wife and 3-year-old son, looked on in horror. In the "Skycrash" stunt, the vehicles are meant to soar off ramps at 50 mph into a head-on aerial collision. In yesterday's accident, the cars failed to leave their ramps at the same time, causing them to hit at the wrong angle, a promoter said. One car came in too low and its roof was sheared off by the other vehicle.
NEWS
April 9, 1987 | BY ADRIAN LEE
The critics are ganging up on John Paul II's latest paper on human sexuality as if the Vatican was having another go at proving the world is flat. They haven't read it, these critics, or if they have, they haven't absorbed what he's saying. Not entirely the fault of the critics, by the way; some day, the Vatican is going to reach back to the glory days of the newspaper business and hire itself a "rewriteman" like the old Bulletin's Adolph Katz. One look at Adolph's deadline prose would dispel any Vatican qualms about hiring a Jew to rewrite its papers into plain English.
NEWS
March 10, 1989
WHAT THREAT IS THE CRIPPLED CHILD? Conscious of the breathtaking sacrifice involved in what his family did for him, he detected where destiny beckoned. The future for babies like him never looked more promising, but now society frowned upon giving spastic babies a right to life. Now they threatened to abort babies like him, to detect in advance their handicapped state, to burrow through the womb and label them for death, to baffle their mothers with fear for their coming, and yet, the spastic baby would ever be the soul which would never kill, maim, creed falsehood or hate brotherhood.
NEWS
October 27, 1990 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
The court has declared that she is not his mother, though he grew in her womb, though he came into the world down her birth canal, though her breasts filled with milk for him. Anna Johnson is now officially, legally, unrelated to the boy she bore. A judge in California has ruled that Anna was just a prenatal "foster parent" to Mark and Crispina Calvert's fetus. She nurtured it, fed it, housed it - but it always belonged to them. The womb was merely rented: When her work was done, the boy-product belonged to his genetic owners.
NEWS
December 18, 1987
LIGHT SENTENCE WAS APPROPRIATE Several letters dealt with the sentence of probation for a woman who killed her son who suffered with brain damage. I've spent 23 years in prison. I never killed anyone but was with someone who did. And still, God bless the judge who gave her probation. That poor woman has undergone enough punishment and tribulation before and after shooting her child. God bless the child - and her too. May she eventually find peace and happiness. The judge was fair.
NEWS
March 23, 2012
WILLIAM F. Buckley, a man who made love to the English language, would have raised his patrician eyebrows at people who call mandatory transvaginal ultrasounds "rape. " It's not that I think he'd agree with laws that force women to undergo the procedure. No, it's the deliberate manipulation/mutilation of words for partisan purposes that would have disturbed the Great Right Hope. "Rape" conjures up images of violence, blood, bruising and shattered lives, (or, for that matter, frat boys about as drunk as their passed-out "dates")
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 1, 2013
Exposure to tobacco smoke while in the womb can lead to diminished hearing by adolescence, doctors have found in the first study ever to link tobacco use and hearing impairment. The new research by Michael Weitzman and Anil Lalwani of the NYU-Langone School of Medicine suggests compounds in tobacco smoke cross the placenta and harm the auditory system. In the past, doctors have linked low birth weight, asthma, sudden infant death syndrome, and recurrent ear infections to both maternal smoking and exposure of the mother to secondhand smoke while pregnant.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Serenely unaware of her star status, Audrey Rose Oberio nestled in the crook of her father's arm before going home last week from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Months earlier, surgeons had closed a hole in her spine, a defect called spina bifida. With her delivery May 28, the hospital celebrated the arrival of its 1,000th fetal-surgery patient - and the power of diagnosing and treating birth defects in the womb. "When you hit a milestone like this, you tend to be reflective," said Scott Adzick, the pioneering surgeon who in 1995 established Children's Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment.
NEWS
March 23, 2012
WILLIAM F. Buckley, a man who made love to the English language, would have raised his patrician eyebrows at people who call mandatory transvaginal ultrasounds "rape. " It's not that I think he'd agree with laws that force women to undergo the procedure. No, it's the deliberate manipulation/mutilation of words for partisan purposes that would have disturbed the Great Right Hope. "Rape" conjures up images of violence, blood, bruising and shattered lives, (or, for that matter, frat boys about as drunk as their passed-out "dates")
NEWS
September 12, 2011
Researchers have shown previously that maternal stress during pregnancy may have negative consequences for the fetus, both in humans and laboratory animals. A new study from the University of Pennsylvania suggests that in mice, such impacts - namely, an increased sensitivity to stress - are passed along even to the fetus' children. The finding, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, is an example of epigenetics: the study of how genes can be switched on or off in ways that may be inherited by future generations.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2006 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
ON THE COVER of its Jan. 30 issue, Celebrity Living reported that Angelina Jolie was carrying "TWINS!" In its Feb. 6 issue (these magazines really do predict the future), Life & Style Weekly said "IT'S A GIRL!" But in its Feb. 6 issue, the National Enquirer said, "It's a BOY!" Based on this info, Tattle will have to go with its own version: "ANGELINA MIRACLE! FETUS CHANGES SEX INSIDE HER!" 19 going on Medicare After being hospitalized for exhaustion and asthma, you'd think Lindsay Lohan would stop partying so hard and quit smoking.
NEWS
November 15, 2001
Women can do all the important things men can do, but women can also do some essential things men cannot: bear children and nourish them from their bodies. Many men suffer, largely subconsciously, from insecurities that might be termed "womb envy" or "breast envy. " To compensate for the things they cannot do, men tell women they may not do other things. Which activities women are excluded from varies from one culture to another, but some form of exclusion seems to exist in all cultures.
NEWS
December 15, 1998 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last March, while still in his mother's womb, Noah Kipfmiller had pioneering surgery at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia to cover his exposed spinal cord, a birth defect called spina bifida. The operation was risky. It had been done only a handful of times at one other hospital. But Noah's defect was so severe that without surgery, his prognosis was bleak: paralysis from the waist down, leg deformities, incontinence, possibly even brain damage. When Noah was born prematurely in May, his parents and doctors were elated to see that he was well-developed and vigorous.
NEWS
August 9, 1998 | By David Hafetz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Pregnant and musically inclined, Linda Marandola would press headphones against her belly and play opera, sending strains of Pavarotti to the unborn girl in her womb. After Amanda's birth, Marandola followed the prenatal musical interludes with live recitals as the baby sat in a car seat by the family piano while her mother touched the keys. Perhaps it's no surprise that when Amanda crawled, she made for the piano. Later, she banged on the keys, her legs dangling impatiently over the pedals.
NEWS
July 3, 1998 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The prognosis was heartbreaking. The baby would be born with spina bifida, a spinal cord defect that can cause leg paralysis, deformities and brain damage. But it didn't turn out that way. Yesterday, Noah Kipfmiller snoozed in the arms of his mother, Mellissa, at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, a healthy, well-developed, 4-pound pioneer in the world of fetal surgery. In March, while still in his mother's womb, he underwent risky, experimental surgery to repair the spinal defect.
NEWS
November 15, 1996 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
A 90-minute-old girl with a defective heart was given a new one in a remarkable operation, becoming what is believed to be the youngest heart-transplant recipient in the nation. Cheyenne Pyle was recovering well yesterday, four days after doctors at Miami's Jackson Children's Hospital opened her tiny chest, removed her heart and replaced it with one from another infant. "She looks real good today," Cheyenne's mother, Alberta Pyle of Fort Lauderdale, said as she stroked her baby's bare pink foot.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|