CollectionsWomen Artists
IN THE NEWS

Women Artists

FEATURED ARTICLES
LIVING
April 24, 2009 | By Karla Klein Albertson FOR THE INQUIRER
One of the special benefits for collectors in major cities like Philadelphia is that wonderful things come to them. On the menu this weekend is a banquet of pottery from turn-of-the-century Arts-and-Crafts-movement pieces to contemporary studio works by living artists. Members of the American Art Pottery Association have been touring collections and listening to seminars this week as part of the organization's 2009 convention based in Northeast Philadelphia. Starting at 3:30 p.m. today, collectors will be able to preview about 400 lots, many featuring works by women, which will be offered for sale by auctioneer Greg Belhorn beginning at 5 p.m. During the preview reception, authors will sign their books on ceramics.
NEWS
June 24, 1993 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
Zero. Zilch. Nada. That's how many women artists had solo exhibitions in 1986 at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and a slew of other major art institutions. Consequently, the Guerrilla Girls, a New York City-based group of female arts folks battling for equality in exhibition spaces, gave out plenty of its "rotten banana" awards. But how do Philadelphia's venerable galleries and institutions fare today under that sort of scrutiny?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2001 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Many female artists have labored in the shadow of famous husbands. In that sense, Susan Macdowell Eakins represents a type. But while subordinate to Thomas Eakins, she did create her own artistic legacy. A small show of 25 paintings and two prints at Woodmere Art Museum demonstrates her talent while affirming that she was strongly influenced by Eakins' teaching and philosophy. Both her portrait style - most of the paintings are portraits - and her subjects reflect his gravitational pull.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1999 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
"In Her Voice: Self-Portraits by Women" in the Berman Museum at Ursinus College is an ambitious exhibition that offers several connection points, each at a different level of understanding. A viewer can successfully engage the show through all of them, yet never be entirely sure where the bottom line is. The show was conceived and organized by guest curator Helen Mirkil, who is also an artist. Her wall texts suggest several motives. Women have historically been regarded as second-class artists, and Mirkil wanted to honor women who successfully surmounted the prejudices that denied them equal consideration.
LIVING
June 16, 1999 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Leeway Foundation has awarded grants totaling $280,000 to 11 women artists in the Philadelphia area, the single largest group of awards focused solely on Philadelphia-based women in the arts. "It's an incredible boost," said Lisa Baird, 43, an installation artist. "It's a validation of what you've done already and gives you an excitement about what can come after. " Baird, who returned to art school 20 years after she received her college degree and after she had raised two children, was awarded one of two $15,000 Edna Andrade Emerging Artist Awards, which are given to artists who are at early stages in their careers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1994 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The artist's book - an artwork executed in the form of a book - can be a frustrating format for someone trying to delve into its contents. Artworks aren't normally touched, let alone handled, which means that exhibition visitors rarely are able to fully savor a typical artist's book. "Keepers of Secrets & Truths Otherwise Unknown," in the Berman Museum at Ursinus College, rectifies that situation. This show of artists' books by women is almost fully accessible - only a few works are displayed under glass, so to speak.
NEWS
January 23, 2000 | Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Art by women opened a window onto the second half of the 20th century, illuminating the intersection between a generation of painters of realistic subject matter, who had come to maturity in New York, and work of younger artists they had influenced or taught. Five revered painters from that earlier generation - Nell Blaine, Gretna Campbell, Lois Dodd, Louisa Matthiasdottir and Ruth Miller - are paired with 13 younger women who share common ground with them, yet work in diverse ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1994 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
I do (unusual) things for a hopeful reason; I do them because I want to effect change. - Karen Finley Performance artist The next two weeks present an extraordinary opportunity to see many women who want to effect change - or simply tell stories - in unsettling, outlandish or funny ways. The fifth annual Women's Theatre Festival is bringing to town two performance artists perhaps best known for their conflicts with the National Endowment for the Arts: Holly Hughes and Rachel Rosenthal.
NEWS
October 27, 2006 | By Happy Craven Fernandez
"Why have there been no great women artists?" Linda Nochlin asked this explosive question in 1971 and changed the study of art history. Then and now, her seminal essay, published in Art News, posed a question that still provokes debate. Do the names Peeters, Neel, Frankenthaler and Lin - all accomplished women artists - trip off your tongue like Van Gogh, Picasso, Eakins and Calder? If challenged to name the top 10 best-known or contemporary artists, how often would you include a woman on the list?
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 15, 2013
Do the names Celilia Beaux or Violet Oakley ring a bell? How about Faith Ringgold, an artist renown for her painted quilt series and who used her art to portray the civil rights movement from a female perspective? If you want to know more, the Haverford Township Free Library will hosted a program A Room of Her Own: Women in American Art. Dressler Smith, of the Pennsylvania Academy of the fine Arts will lead a discussion on pioneering 19th century women artists. Smith will show how the political and cultural change in American history "both inspired and challenged women artisits.
NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last year, curators at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts began planning an all-female art exhibition. Organizers hoped it would facilitate a debate about whether feminism is still needed in modern art, but they weren't sure audiences would find the topic worthy of debate. Then came Ken Johnson, a New York Times art critic who in only six sentences sparked an impassioned controversy that has played out for months on his Facebook page, arts blogs, an online petition and, on Sunday evening, a sold-out panel discussion at PAFA on the very topic the curators wanted to discuss all along.
NEWS
June 16, 2012 | By Sherry L. Howard and FOR THE INQUIRER
I fell in love with the man in the painting as soon as I saw him. He was leaning against a rail in his green Army uniform — his stare daring, his demeanor flirty.   I didn't know who he was or what artist Robert Cromartie had in mind when he put him to canvas. The man's uniform placed him around World War II, but his defiant look put him decades ahead. Black soldiers weren't supposed to be so confident in the face of a military that didn't want them. Cromartie is one of what I call Philadelphia's forgotten or lost artists, men and women who worked as schoolteachers or janitors or at the post office to pay the bills.
NEWS
March 2, 2012
Antiques/Art/Crafts Annual Quilt Competition Diverse designs & intricate detail in quilts on display in the Gazebo. Peddler's Village, Rtes. 202 & 263, Lahaska; 215-794-4000. 3/2. Empty House Party Meet the 2012 design team, explore the empty house & grounds, sample Italian specialties & wines, & more. Bucks County Designer House & Gardens, 3864 Spring Valley Rd., Doylestown; 215-345-2191. $25-$30. 3/4. 2-5 pm. Fresh + Wholesome Paintings, photography, screen printing, drawing, jewelry, weaving & mixed media.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2011 | By Victoria Donohoe, For The Inquirer
Context counts in the two-part Violet Oakley exhibition at Chestnut Hill's Woodmere Museum - a virtually forgotten series of her murals, and a group show of female artists active in Paris while Oakley was an art student there. Oakley's William Penn series at the State Capitol Building are her most celebrated murals. But the monumental murals from 1910-11 in Woodmere's permanent collection may come as a surprise to many. Oakley, then 36, created The Building of the House of Wisdom for the entrance hall of a townhouse architect Frank Miles Day was completing at 17th and Locust Streets for Charlton Yarnall of the Ellis Yarnall & Son importing firm.
LIVING
April 24, 2009 | By Karla Klein Albertson FOR THE INQUIRER
One of the special benefits for collectors in major cities like Philadelphia is that wonderful things come to them. On the menu this weekend is a banquet of pottery from turn-of-the-century Arts-and-Crafts-movement pieces to contemporary studio works by living artists. Members of the American Art Pottery Association have been touring collections and listening to seminars this week as part of the organization's 2009 convention based in Northeast Philadelphia. Starting at 3:30 p.m. today, collectors will be able to preview about 400 lots, many featuring works by women, which will be offered for sale by auctioneer Greg Belhorn beginning at 5 p.m. During the preview reception, authors will sign their books on ceramics.
NEWS
November 13, 2008 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
As the days grow shorter and the winds blow colder, 6-foot-tall multicolored boots in prominent Philadelphia gathering spaces could be a fashionable reminder that chilly weather is ahead. But despite the boots' seasonal arrival, they are not an indicator of winter's beginning, but rather Moore College of Art and Design's way of feting 160 years of educating women artists. "We wanted a symbolic way to encapsulate the journey of where our alumnae are now, where they intend to go and how Moore created that foundation," said Christa Santivasi Lutz, 37, a Moore graduate from the class of 1994, who devised the sculptural celebration.
NEWS
May 8, 2007 | By Ain Ardron-Doley FOR THE INQUIRER
Wrapping up the Black Lily Film & Music Festival Sunday night, more than a dozen women artists played to a sold-out crowd at World Cafe Live. Evolved from the female-centric live music series that went on every Tuesday night in Philly from 2000 to 2005, the inaugural festival was steeped in nostalgia. When statuesque Imani Uzuri took the stage and launched into "Her Holy Water," she immediately channeled Grace Jones. Backed by a full band that included the Roots' Ahmir "?uestlove" Thompson on drums and James Poyser on keys, Uzuri mesmerized with an ethereal, soulful rock.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2006 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
Beth Heinly says she admires paint-pushing abstract expressionists like Joan Mitchell and Willem de Kooning. The 25-year-old artist also connects with neo-expressionist Jean-Michel Basquiat, and, more recently, with his pop mentor Andy Warhol, who she says has appeared in her dreams. This quirky pedigree can be detected in Heinly's super-casual, unframed marker-on-paper drawings at the Black Floor Gallery, but her channeling is entirely original. Heinly's deliberately awkward, Frankenstein-walk line and scrawling of blunt, graffitilike sentiments are reminiscent of Basquiat.
NEWS
October 27, 2006 | By Happy Craven Fernandez
"Why have there been no great women artists?" Linda Nochlin asked this explosive question in 1971 and changed the study of art history. Then and now, her seminal essay, published in Art News, posed a question that still provokes debate. Do the names Peeters, Neel, Frankenthaler and Lin - all accomplished women artists - trip off your tongue like Van Gogh, Picasso, Eakins and Calder? If challenged to name the top 10 best-known or contemporary artists, how often would you include a woman on the list?
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|