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Women S History Month

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NEWS
March 24, 2004 | By Claude Lewis
On March 6, President Bush signed an executive order proclaiming March as Women's History Month. But the contributions of women have been so powerful that they should be celebrated throughout the year. Despite the enormous obstacle of gender, women have contributed monumentally to nearly every discipline. Most often, lacking the opportunity to join the workforce, many labored at home and in private workshops or laboratories where their accomplishments were usually credited to men. Despite persistent prejudice against women, Maria Mitchell became a highly celebrated astronomer.
NEWS
March 8, 1992 | By Tia Swanson, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Women's biggest problem, says Mary Frances Berry, is fear. Fear of change, fear of displeasing the men in their lives, fear of losing the positions they have gained, fear of appearing unfeminine. "It's not men who keep women from being equal," said Berry, a woman who once denounced the Reagan administration's civil-rights policies from her seat on the U.S. Civil Rights Commission. Reagan fired her, but she sued and won reinstatement. Last week, she was the keynote speaker for the March observance of Women's History Month at Glassboro State College.
NEWS
March 5, 1989 | By Dianne Gordon-Lyles, Special to The Inquirer
For Amelia Kressler, March is the time to honor women. "It's a time to focus on women who've made a difference, focus on issues facing women today and focus on women in the year 2000," said Kressler, the chairman of the Gloucester County Commission on Women. For Judith Winn, Women's History Month is "a celebration for older women. " "I think about how much has changed since I was an undergraduate 30 years ago and how many more opportunities there are for women today," said Winn, vice president of Burlington County College and chairman of that county's committee on women.
NEWS
March 10, 1988 | By Debbie Davis, Special to The Inquirer
Wendy Chmielewski, archivist of the Swarthmore College Peace Collection, discussed the pacifist tradition within the women's movement and the struggle of women for rights - especially the right to vote - last week as part of a Women's History Month program at Springfield High School. Chmielewski, of Lansdowne, edited the Guide to Sources on Women in the Swarthmore College Peace Collection, which is due to be released this month. When introducing Chmielewski, David Bollinger, assistant principal at Springfield, said her presentation Friday night would be the first in a series of programs sponsored by the Springfield School District's Community Education Council and Springfield High School in observance of Women's History Month.
NEWS
March 4, 1990 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
Just how much Kathleen Ruben's Girl Scout troop knew about the contributions of women throughout history soon became apparent after they started working on a new scout badge, "Learning About Women. " Although they knew of the achievements of a lot of men, the third graders in Troop 97 in Marlton didn't know much about the accomplishments of women, said Ruben, the leader of Troop 97 and a member of the Alice Paul chapter of the National Organization for Women. "Even those of us who are chapter members may not know as much as we should about the contributions of women," said Ruben.
NEWS
March 5, 2000 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In celebration of Women's History Month, area colleges are presenting programs recognizing the struggles and contributions of women. The offerings include a one-woman play about the suffragist who wrote the Equal Rights Amendment in the early 1900s. The Women's Center at Rosemont College is sponsoring the free performance of Alice Paul at 7 p.m. March 14 in the McShain Performing Arts Center. For more information, call 610-527-0200, Ext. 2334. Taylor Williams of Philadelphia, a lawyer who has performed with regional theater companies and with the American Historical Theatre, will portray Paul, a Mount Laurel resident who worked for women's rights throughout her life.
TRAVEL
March 18, 2012
10 for the Road Connecticut. Brookfield Film Festival 2012 - "Shorts and to the Point" runs March 30-31 at Brookfield Theatre for the Arts, 182 Whisconier Rd. $10. 8 p.m. March 30; 4 and 8 p.m. March 31. Reservations suggested. 203-775-2895; www.brookfieldartscommission.org . Delaware. "Spring Concert" by the Mid-Atlantic Symphony Orchestra, with conductor Julien Benichou, will be 7:30 p.m. March 24 at Mariner's Bethel Church, Ocean View. $35; students $15; children $5. 888-846-8600; www.midatlanticsympony.org . Maryland.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
I GET A CHILL whenever I listen to James Brown soulfully sing "It's a Man's World. " I especially like to shout, "You got that right!" when he says, "But it wouldn't be nothing, nothing without a woman or a girl. " Those lyrics come to mind as we celebrate Women's History Month - it's not a man's world anymore. Sunday marked 100 years since thousands of women marched down Pennsylvania Avenue demanding the right to vote. They were taunted and pushed, but they pressed on. So, too, have women pressed their way into jobs in the private and public sectors.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2011
WE'VE COME a long way, baby, but a lot of us could give a damn about Women's History Month. We're way more hyped about March Madness and that spring is almost here than about paying attention to this annual recognition of the accomplishments of American women. Bring up the subject of Women's History Month and people's eyes glaze over. I know I'm generalizing, but Americans as a group aren't that into history, much less women's history. And a lot of those who aren't bored by the subject get all feisty and start wanting to debate whether there's even a need for a whole month dedicated to women's history.
NEWS
March 27, 2013 | BY SOFIYA BALLIN, Daily News Staff Writer ballins@phillynews.com, 215-854-5902
A WOMAN'S HEALTH isn't one-size-fits-all, but the conversation of what it means to be a woman often can be too narrow. That's an issue WURD Radio hopes to address Saturday during a panel discussion that the station is hosting in honor of Women's History Month. "Sisters Speak: Examining the Impact of Race, Culture and History on Body, Mind and Spirit" will be at the Pennsylvania Convention Center from 3 to 5 p.m. The program is meant to be a safe haven where issues specific to black women can be discussed openly, focusing on improving mental, spiritual and emotional health as well as celebrating the strength of femininity, organizers say. "The experiences of all women are not the same.
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NEWS
March 27, 2013 | BY SOFIYA BALLIN, Daily News Staff Writer ballins@phillynews.com, 215-854-5902
A WOMAN'S HEALTH isn't one-size-fits-all, but the conversation of what it means to be a woman often can be too narrow. That's an issue WURD Radio hopes to address Saturday during a panel discussion that the station is hosting in honor of Women's History Month. "Sisters Speak: Examining the Impact of Race, Culture and History on Body, Mind and Spirit" will be at the Pennsylvania Convention Center from 3 to 5 p.m. The program is meant to be a safe haven where issues specific to black women can be discussed openly, focusing on improving mental, spiritual and emotional health as well as celebrating the strength of femininity, organizers say. "The experiences of all women are not the same.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
I GET A CHILL whenever I listen to James Brown soulfully sing "It's a Man's World. " I especially like to shout, "You got that right!" when he says, "But it wouldn't be nothing, nothing without a woman or a girl. " Those lyrics come to mind as we celebrate Women's History Month - it's not a man's world anymore. Sunday marked 100 years since thousands of women marched down Pennsylvania Avenue demanding the right to vote. They were taunted and pushed, but they pressed on. So, too, have women pressed their way into jobs in the private and public sectors.
TRAVEL
March 18, 2012
10 for the Road Connecticut. Brookfield Film Festival 2012 - "Shorts and to the Point" runs March 30-31 at Brookfield Theatre for the Arts, 182 Whisconier Rd. $10. 8 p.m. March 30; 4 and 8 p.m. March 31. Reservations suggested. 203-775-2895; www.brookfieldartscommission.org . Delaware. "Spring Concert" by the Mid-Atlantic Symphony Orchestra, with conductor Julien Benichou, will be 7:30 p.m. March 24 at Mariner's Bethel Church, Ocean View. $35; students $15; children $5. 888-846-8600; www.midatlanticsympony.org . Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2011
WE'VE COME a long way, baby, but a lot of us could give a damn about Women's History Month. We're way more hyped about March Madness and that spring is almost here than about paying attention to this annual recognition of the accomplishments of American women. Bring up the subject of Women's History Month and people's eyes glaze over. I know I'm generalizing, but Americans as a group aren't that into history, much less women's history. And a lot of those who aren't bored by the subject get all feisty and start wanting to debate whether there's even a need for a whole month dedicated to women's history.
NEWS
March 15, 2010 | By Grant Calder
For the first time in history, women make up more than half of the American workforce. They already constitute almost 60 percent of college students and a solid majority of degree-earners in the last couple of decades. Yet in most high school history courses, women remain woefully underrepresented. Some claim this simply reflects reality: Women played a less visible role in past generations, they say - a regrettable result of their oppression by a male-dominated society - but what can be done about it now?
NEWS
March 24, 2004 | By Claude Lewis
On March 6, President Bush signed an executive order proclaiming March as Women's History Month. But the contributions of women have been so powerful that they should be celebrated throughout the year. Despite the enormous obstacle of gender, women have contributed monumentally to nearly every discipline. Most often, lacking the opportunity to join the workforce, many labored at home and in private workshops or laboratories where their accomplishments were usually credited to men. Despite persistent prejudice against women, Maria Mitchell became a highly celebrated astronomer.
NEWS
March 5, 2000 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In celebration of Women's History Month, area colleges are presenting programs recognizing the struggles and contributions of women. The offerings include a one-woman play about the suffragist who wrote the Equal Rights Amendment in the early 1900s. The Women's Center at Rosemont College is sponsoring the free performance of Alice Paul at 7 p.m. March 14 in the McShain Performing Arts Center. For more information, call 610-527-0200, Ext. 2334. Taylor Williams of Philadelphia, a lawyer who has performed with regional theater companies and with the American Historical Theatre, will portray Paul, a Mount Laurel resident who worked for women's rights throughout her life.
NEWS
March 8, 1992 | By Tia Swanson, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Women's biggest problem, says Mary Frances Berry, is fear. Fear of change, fear of displeasing the men in their lives, fear of losing the positions they have gained, fear of appearing unfeminine. "It's not men who keep women from being equal," said Berry, a woman who once denounced the Reagan administration's civil-rights policies from her seat on the U.S. Civil Rights Commission. Reagan fired her, but she sued and won reinstatement. Last week, she was the keynote speaker for the March observance of Women's History Month at Glassboro State College.
NEWS
March 4, 1990 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
Just how much Kathleen Ruben's Girl Scout troop knew about the contributions of women throughout history soon became apparent after they started working on a new scout badge, "Learning About Women. " Although they knew of the achievements of a lot of men, the third graders in Troop 97 in Marlton didn't know much about the accomplishments of women, said Ruben, the leader of Troop 97 and a member of the Alice Paul chapter of the National Organization for Women. "Even those of us who are chapter members may not know as much as we should about the contributions of women," said Ruben.
NEWS
March 5, 1989 | By Dianne Gordon-Lyles, Special to The Inquirer
For Amelia Kressler, March is the time to honor women. "It's a time to focus on women who've made a difference, focus on issues facing women today and focus on women in the year 2000," said Kressler, the chairman of the Gloucester County Commission on Women. For Judith Winn, Women's History Month is "a celebration for older women. " "I think about how much has changed since I was an undergraduate 30 years ago and how many more opportunities there are for women today," said Winn, vice president of Burlington County College and chairman of that county's committee on women.
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