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Women S Way

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LIVING
March 30, 2000 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Faded jeans. Comfy sweater. Not a trace of makeup. Everything about the young woman on stage at this Saturday morning work party says "unassuming" - except her title. "I'm Melissa Weiler Gerber," she tells a crowd of volunteers gathered in a chilly church basement in East Falls. "And I have the privilege of being the executive director of Women's Way. " At 32, and looking a good deal younger, Gerber is used to "oh's" of surprise when people find out who she is. For one thing, she's a generation younger than her recent predecessors at Women's Way, an organization founded in 1976 to raise money for women's causes seen as too radical for traditional workplace fund-raising campaigns: equal opportunity, reproductive freedom, and an end to rape and domestic violence.
NEWS
May 9, 2002 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was 1975 and they were the vanguard of the Philadelphia women's movement: a group of nonprofits run by women for women, offering rape counseling, health services, legal aid and job assistance. But they were having a tough time keeping their doors open. They were seen as too radical, and few foundations or corporations were willing to fund them. The United Way wouldn't include them. "This was the beginning of the women's movement, and we were about restructuring basic social institutions that perpetuated male domination," said Ernesta Ballard, then the president of a group that aided women in prison.
NEWS
May 2, 1994 | by Cynthia Burton and John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writers
Sam Katz lost a full day recently thanks to the flu. "I laid down for a nap and woke up the next morning," he said. He was forced to miss a fund-raiser. Bad timing. Philadelphian Katz needs every waking hour and every available dollar to make a credible challenge in the Republican primary for governor. He's running close behind better-known Attorney General Ernie Preate Jr. and party-backed U.S. Rep. Tom Ridge. Among the Democrats, polls show Lynn Yeakel in second place, trailing Lt. Gov. Mark Singel, who is better known and better financed than she. As the race heads into the last eight days, these chasers are pulling out the stops to make up ground on the leaders.
NEWS
February 8, 1994 | By Katharine Seelye, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lynn Yeakel, who lost to Arlen Specter in a high-profile bid for the U.S. Senate two years ago, re-entered the limelight yesterday by announcing her candidacy for governor. At a news conference at her Philadelphia headquarters, Yeakel, surrounded by family, offered a platform built more on principle than on anything specific that she would do if elected. "Four principles will guide my administration," she said, citing common sense, responsiveness, fairness and openness. Yeakel, a Democrat, recited a familiar litany of what ails Pennsylvania: low job growth, high business taxes, bad schools, random violent crime, and self-serving politicians.
NEWS
October 27, 1992 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Democratic national chairman Ron Brown sought yesterday to put candidate Lynn Yeakel at the crest of the Democratic political wave, saying she was needed in the U.S. Senate to reverse the tide of the country. For Yeakel, Brown's remarks in Philadelphia were the highlight of a day in which she tried again and again to position her opponent, Republican U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter, as part of a government and GOP administration that have allowed the country to crumble economically. At a news conference at city Democratic headquarters, Brown said Yeakel "is not running for the U.S. Senate just to run for the U.S. Senate.
NEWS
October 8, 1992 | By Wanda Motley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Before a few well-chosen backdrops, Democratic senatorial candidate Lynn Yeakel yesterday brought her agenda on increased funding for education and job training to this hardscrabble, blue-collar region. Yeakel, visiting three classes of preschoolers at the city's largest Head Start center and a job-training facility, sounded her familiar themes that the federal government needs to do more to ensure that all children have access to preschool and a college education and that all citizens have an opportunity to work.
NEWS
October 10, 1992 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
Lynn Yeakel is standing in a living room in this beleaguered steel valley talking to a houseful of voters about jobs and health care, about Washington and Pennsylvania, about herself and her opponent. She is in what she describes amusingly as her "ninth month" of public life. The official due date is Nov. 3. So she ends these remarks by repeating her slogan, asking these people to have "courage for a change. " It is just one year since Anita Hill faced a phalanx of white male senators in a hearing room.
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | By Nathan Gorenstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A month ago, few knew her name. Today, she is the Democratic nominee for U.S. Senate. So who is Lynn Yeakel? She's 50 years old and a political neophyte - but only in the traditional sense. Active in the women's movement since the 1970s, Yeakel has for the last 11 years headed Women's Way, the fund-raising organization founded in 1977. There, she made her mark by persuading dozens of corporations and businesses to help support agencies and issues that not long ago were considered part of what Yeakel has called "the radical fringe.
NEWS
April 26, 1992 | By Thomas Turcol and David Lieber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Still smarting from polls showing slippage in his support, Lt. Gov. Mark S. Singel campaigned in North Philadelphia yesterday in an attempt to shore up his base with city Democratic ward leaders. He joined U.S. Rep. Lucien E. Blackwell at a rally on North 29th Street, where the lieutenant governor went door-to-door shaking hands with potential Democratic primary voters. Meanwhile, his opponent, Lynn Yeakel, spoke confidently about her campaign at a rally organized by women's groups in Wilkes-Barre.
NEWS
April 19, 1992
In the Pennsylvania primary for the Democratic Senate nomination, the Inquirer endorses Lynn Yeakel. It was a close decision in which the tie-breaker was a factor that too often sounds like a substitute for merit, but in this case rang true. We think Ms. Yeakel would make a better addition to the U.S. Senate than her opponents because she has a special understanding of, and sensitivity for, issues related to women. Saying that she helped found and has directed the rapid growth of Women's Way, an umbrella charity that provides funds for agencies that help women, doesn't begin to capture the special achievement that her leadership has brought about as we have followed it over the years.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 30, 2012 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Twenty years after Lynn Yeakel challenged Arlen Specter for the U.S. Senate, the idea that 1992 was the "year of the woman" seems as quaint as it does sad. If Yeakel had won, she would have been the first female senator from Pennsylvania. No woman has come close since. No woman has ever been the state's governor. Only one woman serves in the state's congressional delegation. No woman has ever been elected mayor in the commonwealth's largest city. And among the 50 state legislatures, Pennsylvania ranks 43d in the proportion of women, only 17 percent.
NEWS
July 13, 2011
As a small-business owner and the board chairman of Women's Way, one of the leading organizations pushing for earned sick days in Philadelphia, I am deeply disappointed at Mayor Nutter's decision to veto the earned-sick-days bill. Contrary to the mayor's assertion that the bill "would put thousands of jobs at risk," paid sick days would, in fact, benefit employers' bottom lines. Research shows that employers who offer paid sick days have higher productivity, employee loyalty, and decreased turnover.
NEWS
November 13, 2009 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lynn Yeakel, the feminist hero who as the Democratic nominee for the U.S. Senate in 1992 nearly defeated incumbent Arlen Specter, yesterday endorsed a candidate to finish the job. Yeakel backed U.S. Rep. Joe Sestak in his bid to deny the Democratic nomination to Specter, who was a Republican when she tangled with him in a bitter campaign nearly 18 years ago. "Joe can be counted on to stand up for what he believes," Yeakel said during a...
NEWS
May 9, 2002 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was 1975 and they were the vanguard of the Philadelphia women's movement: a group of nonprofits run by women for women, offering rape counseling, health services, legal aid and job assistance. But they were having a tough time keeping their doors open. They were seen as too radical, and few foundations or corporations were willing to fund them. The United Way wouldn't include them. "This was the beginning of the women's movement, and we were about restructuring basic social institutions that perpetuated male domination," said Ernesta Ballard, then the president of a group that aided women in prison.
NEWS
April 20, 2000 | By Patrick Kerkstra, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After 31 years in the state Senate, Richard Tilghman figures that his constituents know who he is, what he stands for, and what he will do for them if he is reelected on Nov. 7. That is partly why the Republican senator has declined challenger Lynn Yeakel's invitation to 14 debates - one in each of the 17th Senatorial District's 13 towns, and one more for "good luck. " Yeakel, a Democrat, proposed the debates "to give voters the opportunity to hear from both of us, to hear what we want to do for the district, to be able to compare and contrast in order to make an informed decision on Nov. 7. " "I think it was a very reasonable request," Yeakel added.
LIVING
March 30, 2000 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Faded jeans. Comfy sweater. Not a trace of makeup. Everything about the young woman on stage at this Saturday morning work party says "unassuming" - except her title. "I'm Melissa Weiler Gerber," she tells a crowd of volunteers gathered in a chilly church basement in East Falls. "And I have the privilege of being the executive director of Women's Way. " At 32, and looking a good deal younger, Gerber is used to "oh's" of surprise when people find out who she is. For one thing, she's a generation younger than her recent predecessors at Women's Way, an organization founded in 1976 to raise money for women's causes seen as too radical for traditional workplace fund-raising campaigns: equal opportunity, reproductive freedom, and an end to rape and domestic violence.
NEWS
January 30, 2000
Ready to expand to fully serve women in the region I'm 32 years old, wear chunky shoes and green glasses and take spinning classes to keep in shape. Twenty years younger than my recent predecessors, I have received a few curious looks when I introduced myself as the new executive director of Women's Way. It is a big role to step into. For me, it is nothing less than a dream come true. A lawyer by profession, I have represented some of the city's biggest corporations and many of its poorest citizens, my heart always leaning toward the latter.
BUSINESS
October 22, 1998 | YONG KIM/ DAILY NEWS
Women's Way president Sheehan Becker speaks with Mayor Rendell during "Make it a Day" for Women's Way. Women's Way invited Center City and University City businesses to donate a percentage of yesterday's sales to Women's Way.
NEWS
May 2, 1994 | by Cynthia Burton and John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writers
Sam Katz lost a full day recently thanks to the flu. "I laid down for a nap and woke up the next morning," he said. He was forced to miss a fund-raiser. Bad timing. Philadelphian Katz needs every waking hour and every available dollar to make a credible challenge in the Republican primary for governor. He's running close behind better-known Attorney General Ernie Preate Jr. and party-backed U.S. Rep. Tom Ridge. Among the Democrats, polls show Lynn Yeakel in second place, trailing Lt. Gov. Mark Singel, who is better known and better financed than she. As the race heads into the last eight days, these chasers are pulling out the stops to make up ground on the leaders.
NEWS
February 8, 1994 | By Katharine Seelye, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lynn Yeakel, who lost to Arlen Specter in a high-profile bid for the U.S. Senate two years ago, re-entered the limelight yesterday by announcing her candidacy for governor. At a news conference at her Philadelphia headquarters, Yeakel, surrounded by family, offered a platform built more on principle than on anything specific that she would do if elected. "Four principles will guide my administration," she said, citing common sense, responsiveness, fairness and openness. Yeakel, a Democrat, recited a familiar litany of what ails Pennsylvania: low job growth, high business taxes, bad schools, random violent crime, and self-serving politicians.
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