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NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon is lifting its ban on women serving in combat, opening hundreds of thousands of frontline positions and potentially elite commando jobs after generations of limits on their service, defense officials said Wednesday. The changes, set to be announced Thursday by Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta, will not happen overnight. The services must now develop plans for allowing women to seek the combat positions, a senior military official said. Some jobs may open as soon as this year, while assessments for others - such as special-operations forces, including Navy SEALS and the Army's Delta Force - may take longer.
NEWS
April 8, 2012 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
    Mitt Romney does not often take questions from the pack of reporters that trails him from state to state, and his staff is stingy with one-on-one interview opportunities. Yet as he greeted supporters on the rope line Thursday afternoon at Mountain Energy Services in Tunkhannock, Pa., Romney decided to answer a query shouted over the burble of post-rally noise. Yes, the likely Republican nominee said, women should be admitted to the Augusta National Golf Club, the exclusionary male bastion that hosts the Masters tournament.
NEWS
January 25, 2010 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Twelve years ago, when Nancy Loane visited Washington's headquarters at Valley Forge National Historical Park, she asked the ranger a facetious question: "Did Martha Washington sleep here?" Loane assumed she knew the answer. So she was surprised when the ranger informed her that Martha not only had slept in the stone house that her husband occupied during the winter of 1777-78 but also had spent four months there. The ranger's reply launched Loane on an odyssey of research and discovery and spawned a passion bordering on obsession.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2014
LAST week's column, "Until women can match men's prowess they should not be Marines," provoked some finger-wagging outrage at the gym, but the readers who wrote in mostly agreed with my sentiments. It's OK! Although equal, men and women are different. Honestly, can we at least get a consensus on that? In hopes of continuing the conversation, here's what some readers had to say:   I take great issue with your subheadline - "Until women can match men's prowess they should not be Marines.
NEWS
May 1, 1990 | By Susan Caba, Inquirer Staff Writer
A North Philadelphia man who raped two women and brutally robbed nine others was sentenced yesterday to spend 45 to 90 years in prison. "Clearly, you have given up, by your conscious, deliberate acts . . . the right to live in civilized society," Common Pleas Court Judge Legrome Davis told Christopher Maiden, 22. "You clearly have given up the right to live in a civilized society for the rest of the 20th century, and for the first quarter of...
SPORTS
November 15, 2012
ERIN SHIELDS hit a three-pointer at the buzzer as visiting Saint Joseph's topped Drexel, 47-45, in a women's game Wednesday night. Hollie Mershon (19 points) had put the Dragons (1-1) ahead with a basket with 26 seconds left, erasing a lead Shields (18 points) had given the Hawks (1-1) with a field goal at 1:09. Taylor Wooton had 12 points for Drexel. Chatilla van Grinsven added 12 for SJU. In other games: * At Temple, Victoria Macaulay had 16 points and 13 rebounds as the Owls (2-1)
NEWS
July 24, 2011
The Magdalen Society of Philadelphia, founded in 1800 to rescue and reform "fallen women," was the first organization of its kind in the United States. The stated purpose of the society, under the leadership of Episcopal Bishop William White, Quaker philanthropist George Williams, and a number of other clergymen and concerned citizens, was "restoring to the paths of virtue those unhappy females who in unguarded hours have been robbed of their innocence. " At the Magdalen Home on the corner of Race and Schuylkill Second (now 21st)
NEWS
February 11, 2013
By Nicolaus Mills This year marks the 50th anniversary of Sylvia Plath's breakthrough, feminist novel, The Bell Jar , and, sadly, today marks the 50th anniversary of her tragic suicide. As someone who teaches The Bell Jar , I am hopeful that the kind of serious analysis that has come this year for Betty Friedan on the 50th anniversary of The Feminine Mystique will be Plath's fate as well. The Bell Jar is a wonderful book to teach today precisely because it stands in defiance of the cautious school of feminist thought represented by Princeton's Anne-Marie Slaughter in her Atlantic essay of last summer, "Why Women Still Can't Have It All. " Although The Bell Jar is set in the 1950s, its mix of realism and idealism sends a clear message: Women don't have to settle.
SPORTS
October 1, 2012 | The Inquirer Staff
The La Salle men's and women's cross-country squads took the top prizes at the Mason Invitational in Leesburg, Va., on Saturday. The men were paced by first-place finisher Alfredo Santana (Nueva Esperanza), who ran the 7,800 meters in 24 minutes, 52.2 seconds, finishing the race nearly 12 seconds ahead of the second-place runner. Meghan McGlinchey (West Deptford) dominated the field for the second consecutive week as the La Salle women won their invitational. McGlinchey finished the 5,870-meter race in 20:44.8, crossing the finish line 1:38 before the second place runner.
NEWS
March 9, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The judge did what he could: sentencing Susan Coulter's antagonists, the women who had threatened to kill her and her child because she testified at a double-murder trial. What he could not do was restore Coulter's sense of safety in her neighborhood. "I'm scared for my life," a weeping Coulter told Common Pleas Court Judge Benjamin Lerner on Thursday. "I beg you not to let people like this hurt people. " Lerner tried to reassure Coulter but said there was a limit to what he could do to former neighbors Theresa Merlo and Tara McDowell.
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